French Police sell off confiscated items

French Police sell off confiscated items

Police in the north of the country have been selling off items that have been confiscated during the investigation of crimes.

For at least the last three years police stations in Lille, Roubaix et Tourcoing have all taken part in the trade. In Lille, according to a union representative, the head of the station personally supervised the trade. Staff estimate that on average 1000-3000 euros a month were brought in by the trade which involved selling mopeds, bicycles and other confiscated items to scrap dealers. As the items were supposed to be destroyed there does not seem to be a record of how much money was brought in nor of how it was spent. A representative of the Unsa Police union has called for further investigation to ensure that no-one profited personally from the sales. They are not being described as thefts.

Alliance Police Nationale ( a scab union that is part of the management union confederation and recently complained about a lack of solidarity from prison guards who defended their picket line) is arguing that this trade should be legitimised and that it is only the result of swinging budget cuts of 30-40% over the last 3 years. Although this matter is under investigation by the justice department it is unlikely that anyone will face criminal charges for what would certainly be a crime if committed by anyone other than the police.

Comments

Steven.
Apr 14 2012 18:02

ha, they get away with anything in just about every country!

flaneur
Apr 14 2012 18:26

I know this happens with confisicated goods here in the UK, there's the auction place just down the road.

Diddy-D
Apr 14 2012 21:57

Excellent blog entry, comrade.

Join the Police - become a looting, profiteering, thieving bastard.

Kronstadt_Kid
Apr 15 2012 12:10

What's wrong with this? Is it that people should get their stuff back?

Kronstadt_Kid
Apr 15 2012 12:39

To follow up my comment.... My cousin works for the council and got my nan a free pair of fake ug boots through this sort of thing. That was pretty good.

Vaga
Apr 15 2012 14:45

So, you profit from those thieving bastards?

Kronstadt_Kid
Apr 15 2012 16:46

I probably should have tried to get more and given pairs to all my friends.

Get free stuff whenever you can, good idea to get cheap stuff from police auctions as well.

Diddy-D
Apr 15 2012 23:01

@ Kronstadt_Kid

Why not go the whole hog, and join the scum police. Then you will be in an excellent position to thieve off the poor yeah.

RedEd
Apr 21 2012 12:55

I don't particularly care when police seize property from big time criminals. Those people basically run capitalist organisations, just illegal ones. However, juding from the sums raised per month, the stuff getting sold off was not sufficiently valuable to represent succesful asset seizures on big time criminals, but instead represent asset seizures on people who aren't well off. I'd like to know more though, especially about whether the cops were just lining their pockets, which wouldn't surprise me one bit.

Steven.
Apr 21 2012 13:32
Vaga wrote:
So, you profit from those thieving bastards?

er, that's not what "profit" is.

"Ethical" consumerism is a joke, it doesn't matter where you buy stuff

Vaga
Apr 22 2012 18:16
Steven. wrote:
Vaga wrote:
So, you profit from those thieving bastards?

er, that's not what "profit" is.

"Ethical" consumerism is a joke, it doesn't matter where you buy stuff

You have money. You want to exchange your money for a product of your choice. Your choice, the consideration of where and how to get that desired product, is based on the idea that you want to invest your money in the most efficient way. By buying the cheapest stuff, by making the best investments with your money, is it not the profit in monetary terms what you are looking for?
The money gained in business?

Obviously, there is no ethics. There is only homo economicus, a capitalist, consumerist bastard of a human being.

Steven.
Apr 22 2012 18:44
Vaga wrote:

You have money. You want to exchange your money for a product of your choice. Your choice, the consideration of where and how to get that desired product, is based on the idea that you want to invest your money in the most efficient way. By buying the cheapest stuff, by making the best investments with your money, is it not the profit in monetary terms what you are looking for?
The money gained in business?

Obviously, there is no ethics. There is only homo economicus, a capitalist, consumerist bastard of a human being.

a consumer buying a product doesn't make profit. She's just buying the product.

Profits are made by businesses, and in essence are the sum of their incomings minus the sum of their outgoings. Nothing to do with any individuals' consumption choices.

Vaga
Apr 22 2012 19:26
Steven. wrote:
a consumer buying a product doesn't make profit. She's just buying the product.

Profits are made by businesses, and in essence are the sum of their incomings minus the sum of their outgoings. Nothing to do with any individuals' consumption choices.

sidenote: is a consumer always a she? (sounds a bit sexist)

So, profits are in essence the sum of the incomings minus the sum of their outgoings, and occur when the outcome is positive, no? What is money, if not the means to run a business? Isn't a business an ongoing interaction with the market?
Aren't your incomings the monetary value that you have created by selling your work to the market?
Aren't your outgoings the investments that you make in order to maintain your business?
Aren't you running your own business with your money?

Steven.
Apr 22 2012 21:41

I'm not going to engage in this discussion any further, as those are completely irrelevant questions and entirely off topic with respect to the article.

Vaga
Apr 23 2012 00:29

Sorry,
just couldn't resist commenting on the ethics of consumption, as I think that it does matter. I didn't mean to lead off-topic though, so there is no need to continue that discussion.

With respect to the article, it is a personal choice, whether you get your new bicycle from the trade of confiscated items, or a self-organized bicycle workshop.
The trade of confiscated items is of course nothing compared to other dirty businesses, that have blood on their price-tags (diamonds, oil,...). It is the combination of state authority and businessman in one that pisses me off. It's lacking moral in a double-sense of way. The uniform that binds to the law and does not permit personal ethics. The businessman, the homo economicus, whose only moral principle is the profit.

Thieving bastards.

radicalgraffiti
Apr 23 2012 00:47
Vaga wrote:

With respect to the article, it is a personal choice, whether you get your new bicycle from the trade of confiscated items, or a self-organized bicycle workshop.

what self organised bicycle work shop? and if you can find one is it the same price?

Vaga
Apr 23 2012 10:27

I was referring to those sort of community workshops that are put up by enthusiastic bike-loving activists in order to provide a space for the neighbourhood in which they can repair their bike or put together their new bike with the help of the collective. Normally, the "price" is that of the material only, but that depends on the collective.
It is a pity that this sort of thing is not more widespread, as it is a nice do-it-yourself approach.

For example, something like this DIY bike workshop in Brighton.

But we are getting off-topic again...

radicalgraffiti
Apr 23 2012 10:51
Vaga wrote:
I was referring to those sort of community workshops that are put up by enthusiastic bike-loving activists in order to provide a space for the neighbourhood in which they can repair their bike or put together their new bike with the help of the collective. Normally, the "price" is that of the material only, but that depends on the collective.
It is a pity that this sort of thing is not more widespread, as it is a nice do-it-yourself approach.

For example, something like this DIY bike workshop in Brighton.

But we are getting off-topic again...

your assuming that there is one near where people live, other wise they don't have that choice

Vaga
Apr 23 2012 17:48

as I said, it is a pity that this sort of thing is not more widespread. your choice can nevertheless be to initiate one yourself and find people to help you. this way you would get your bike at low cost sooner or later, opposed to the possibility of getting it directly from the market. of course, you have many more alternatives, and that always depends on the individual conditions, so no need to get more concrete with that, as it always comes back to the point: it is a personal choice.
if you want go on with that discussion, we could open a new thread: D-I-Y vs market, or something like that?

radicalgraffiti
Apr 23 2012 18:00
Vaga wrote:
as I said, it is a pity that this sort of thing is not more widespread. your choice can nevertheless be to initiate one yourself and find people to help you. this way you would get your bike at low cost sooner or later, opposed to the possibility of getting it directly from the market. of course, you have many more alternatives, and that always depends on the individual conditions, so no need to get more concrete with that, as it always comes back to the point: it is a personal choice.
if you want go on with that discussion, we could open a new thread: D-I-Y vs market, or something like that?

its my choice to buy a bike or to set up a bike making coop and do with out until they make one? are you serious? that sounds like the same crap supporters of capitalism go on about saying we have a choice to start our own business if we don't like working for anyone else.

Vaga
Apr 23 2012 19:17
radicalgraffiti wrote:
its my choice to buy a bike or to set up a bike making coop and do with out until they make one? are you serious? that sounds like the same crap supporters of capitalism go on about saying we have a choice to start our own business if we don't like working for anyone else.

hold on, I really didn't want to sound like that and I will try to make me clear.
the difference I am referring to, is not one of quantity or of duration, it is rather a qualitative decision:
in another example: do you choose the stairway or the elevator to reach the upper floor? the outcome is the same: you are at the upper floor (you have your bike).
the elevator may seem more comfortable, as little physical effort is required.
with the stairway you certainly have a different experience in the process: it takes more time than the elevator, but in the elevator you would have missed the interesting library that is found at the stairway, or any other thing that can be considered a benefit to your personal well-being.

it still depends on your needs. you need the bike now? well, buy one from the market (or steal it).
if not, you can make the process to finally "get" your bike more fun. in the end you have not only built yourself the thing you wanted, but you have made friends with other bike-loving people, set up a workshop with tools to use for the community for free so that bikes can be repaired, and have learned how a bike can be constructed.

as I said, thread about D-I-Y? The Do-it-Yourself approach is anti-capitalist, and has nothing to do with starting your own business.