Libertarian Socialism in South America: A Roundtable Interview/Socialismo Libertario en Sur America: Una Entrevista Mesa Redonda

A series of interviews carried out by the Black Rose Anarchist Federation with libertarian socialist groups in countries such as Brazil, Argentina and Chile.

Libertarian Socialism in South America: A Roundtable Interview, Part I, Chile

In the United States, growing segments of the population are undergoing a period of profound politicization and polarization. Political elites are struggling to maintain control as increasing numbers of people seek out alternatives on the left and the right. In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, political organizations on the left have grown significantly, most notably expressed in the explosive growth of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). Meanwhile, the Trump administration has joined other far-right governments emerging around the globe, emboldening fascist forces in the streets. These developments have sparked widespread debate on the nature of socialism and its distinct flavors within and outside the US.

Among the various branches within the broad socialist tradition, libertarian socialism is possibly the least understood. For many people in the US, libertarian socialism sounds like a contradiction in terms. The corrosive influence of the Cold War has distorted our understanding of socialism, while the explicit hijacking of the term “libertarian” by right-wing forces has stripped it of its roots within the socialist-communist camp. Outside the exceptional case of the US, libertarianism is widely understood to be synonymous with anarchism or anti-state socialism. In Latin America in particular, libertarian socialists have played a critical role in popular struggles across the region, from mass student movements to the recent wave of feminist struggles. To expand and enrich the current debate on socialism in the US, we spoke with several militants from political organizations in the tradition of libertarian socialism in Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, exploring the history, theory and practice of libertarian socialism.

Due to the length of responses, we will be publishing this roundtable interview in installments. For part 1, we spoke with Juan and Pablo from Solidaridad in Chile. We also wanted to thank everyone who contributed to our Building Bridges of International Solidarity Fundraiser which made this interview series possible. See here for Part II on Argentina.

—Introduction, interview and translation by Enrique Guerrero-López

Enrique Guerrero-López (EGL): Can you introduce yourself, tell us the name of your organization, and give a short summary of its origins and your main work?

Juan & Pablo, Solidaridad (J/P): Solidarity, formerly called “Solidarity, Libertarian Communist Federation,” was born from a political process called “Libertarian Communist Congress,” which took place between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2016. This process consisted of a regrouping of libertarian communist currents in Chile after a deep political crisis that we experienced between 2011 and 2013. It was an extremely rich period of experiences— a moment in which the working class carried out intense activity through different social movements, in student conflicts, socio-environmental conflicts, and, to a certain extent, trade unions.

Although in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, anarchism was the main political current within the working class in Chile and across much of the world, this influence was already lost by the 1930s, remaining a marginal current throughout half of the twentieth century, except for some exceptional moments such as the general strike of 1956. Despite its decline, some of its tactical and strategic elements persisted in the militant unionism of the twentieth century.

Libertarian communism began to reemerge in Chile at the end of the 1990s, and in 1999 the Anarchist Communist Unification Congress (CUAC) was founded, which would be the first political organization of this resurgence. From that moment on, a long and rich experience of political work has been generated in different sectors and social movements: territorial, union, and with a strong growth in student struggles. The CUAC as an organization lasted a few years, but after its break it created new organizations that were subdivided and grouped in the following years. These breaks were the expression of different tendencies that were forming within this common branch. At the beginning of 2010, a first congress was held in which several of these organizations were called to evaluate everything that had been advanced ten years before. Participants included the Libertarian Students Front (FEL) and three organizations that would converge in the Libertarian Communist Federation (FCL). The absence of the Libertarian Communist Organization (OCL), direct heir of the CUAC, is notable. Part of the conclusions of that meeting was the success of the idea of ​​“social insertion,” 1 which meant returning anarchism to the class struggle, participating from within the different conflicts in which the working class was participating. By 2011, the influence of this political current reached one of its highest points. In the period between 2011 and 2013, we gained public visibility— a real presence within different social movements— and we began to be considered a current to be taken into account within the political spectrum. We represented hundreds of militants present in different social conflicts; we had murals, magazines, social media, and more. Just to give an example, in 2013, we won the presidency of the country’s main student federation (the Student Federation of the University of Chile) and filled the headlines with notes about anarchism and feminism. But that was the zenith. We were forced to update our politics, to assume new challenges, and we found that there were many issues for which we were not prepared.

In the following period, we found ourselves with a strategy deficit. A product of the social mobilizations of that time and the delegitimization of the main political parties was that, the entire political spectrum was reconfiguring; that is to say, it was not something that only affected us within the libertarian communist tradition, but all the organizations, both on the right and on the left. In our case, it strongly impacted the resurgence of feminism, which questions inequalities and gender oppression in society as a whole as well as within the organizations on the left.

Faced with this lack of strategy in the face of new challenges, the different organizations of libertarian communism in Chile began to choose different paths. An important part, which is now represented by the organizations Socialism and Freedom (SOL) and the Libertarian Left (IL), developed a strategy called “democratic rupture,” which put at its center social insertion and struggle over the institutionality of the State. These organizations are today within the Broad Front (FA), a conglomerate of social democratic, liberal, and also leftist organizations that aim to be a new progressive pole in Chile and that have had great electoral success. We believe that it expresses a political phenomenon similar to that of the DSA in the US.

On the other hand, we were left with an important number of militants, coming from different libertarian organizations and also from other tendencies (critical and libertarian Marxists; anti-capitalist feminists) that were distancing themselves from those bets, but without being able to present an alternative project. Faced with this need, we started the Libertarian Communist Congress, which lasted two years and gave birth to Solidarity as an organization. However, it was not until 2017 that this process could materialize into unitary political action with deployment in different political and social conflicts.

Currently, our participation is taking place in different multi-sectoral social movements: in the feminist movement through the March 8 coordinator, in the Health for All movement (MSPT), in the No + AFP movement that fights for a new pension system, and, with lower participation, among teachers and students. In all these movements, our militancy occupies, without false humility, a prominent place, influencing the political perspectives assumed by these movements. Our current militancy is not very numerous, but we have opted for a qualitative growth that has subsequently been expressed in quantitative growth. As a result of a positive evaluation of that deployment, we have decided to take new steps and to begin to articulate an anti-capitalist political reference point with other organizations with which we have found ourselves, in practice, in those movements. This coalition will maintain the independence of each organization, but will add efforts to be an alternative to a much broader spectrum of the working class, trying to orient from an anti-capitalist critique the political and social opposition to the government.

EGL: What are the roots of libertarian socialism in South America?

J/P: We could say that capitalism expanded throughout the whole world with its own contradictions. From the beginning of colonization, going through the republican periods, there were always great social conflicts that have included resistance and emancipation from the oppressed sectors. But it was not until the late nineteenth century that immigrants arrived on our continent who had participated in processes of class struggle in Europe (and had experienced their respective defeats). These immigrants brought with them more clearly anarchist perspectives along with other socialist currents that also arrived. They did not only bring ideas, but also real, historical experiences of those processes, which could perfectly connect with the working class’ own experience of struggle on the American continent. For that reason, in the case of Chile, initially the main anarchist nuclei were constituted in the cities near the ports.

Like much of the world, anarchism was established in the early twentieth century as the main political current among the working class of Chile. However, it coexisted with other currents in workers’ and student circles. The libertarian current was particularly important in the establishment of resistance societies, proto-unions that would return to the organization of the working class a class struggle perspective, compared to other types of groups at the time such as mutualists. Some of the great landmarks of workers’ struggle of that time, such as the mining strike that culminated in the massacre of Santa María de Iquique (where around 3600 Chilean, Bolivian, and Peruvian workers died, among other nationalities), were led by anarchists.

EGL: What differentiates libertarian socialism from other branches of socialism?

J/P: We understand that the different currents of socialism represent different lessons learned by the working class through their experience of struggle throughout history. Anarchism represents a libertarian tendency within the great political-ideological complex of socialism, which is distinguished from other socialist currents mainly by three elements: the strategic emphasis placed on the political protagonism of the masses in revolutionary processes, through the direct action of their organizations in the expropriation of the economic and political power of the bourgeoisie through a process of self-management and liberation of the creative forces of humanity; a historically situated critique of the nation-state as the political form of capitalism, and therefore the need to create organs of popular power in the process of class struggle; and its dual organizational strategy, in which the political organizations of the working class fulfill a facilitating and organizing role together with the organized masses. It is also worth noting their early interest in a complex vision of the working class and the peasantry, recognizing the racial and gender differences and inequalities within them, leading anarchism to the forefront of the unionization of women and Afro-descendants in the Americas, where we have had strong popular roots.

In negative terms, libertarian socialism has had difficulties in articulating a realistic political critique of the class struggle, sometimes bogged down in dogmatic forms of analysis and in a sectarianism that has kept it in positions of tactical and strategic weakness at key moments in the revolutionary processes of the twentieth century. Their disputes with Marxism have become oversized and extrapolated beyond their specific conjunctures, which has led segments of anarchism to comfortable, identitarian, 2 and marginal positions.

EGL: What role does political organization play within social movements and how does that fit into your vision of libertarian socialist politics?

J/P: The political organization, as we conceive of it, must be a catalyst and a facilitator of the struggles of the working class. Social movements are one form of acquiring those struggles, although not the only one. We believe that the role of orientation is constant, as we are part of the working class, and we function as a possible synthesis of its experiences as an emancipating project. In this sense, our project for society is that of a stateless socialism, of the self-organization of the class, and of the socialization of productive and reproductive tasks, not only because it seems to us a more beautiful ideal, but because it is consistent with our own history of the struggle of the working class, with self-management and popular power as strategic components to achieve.

The organization of the working class can take many directions, as many as its own internal tendencies, which include potential conservative or fascist orientations. Our role is to assume that there is a dispute over that orientation and to present a project more consistent with the aspirations of the class. We believe, moreover, that this is a responsibility. To be abstracted from the task of influencing is to give way to reformism or, even worse, to fascism. It is a responsibility of our times to constitute viable alternatives for a new society that overcomes capitalist relations. And that is achieved by fighting, organized, with clear objectives and strategies. That is why we propose that it is a necessity that libertarian socialism as a project be incarnated in political organizations that are willing to ‘get their hands dirty’ being part of those processes.

We also think that the political organization should encourage the most important organizations in the class to develop programs for the transformation of society, advocating its internal diversity. That is why a revolutionary anti-capitalist project that is not at once feminist, that poses the overcoming of the privileges of gender or race, is impossible. We believe that overcoming capitalism requires the broadest unity of the class and that this can only be obtained by considering all its internal differences.

EGL: In the U.S., there is widespread debate over electoral politics on the left. How do libertarian socialists in South America relate to electoral politics?

J/P: As there are different political currents within the working class, electoral strategies will remain an option, even if we do not want it. As Solidarity, we start from that recognition: there will always be an electoral left, which internally may have many differences (on elections in a ‘tactical’ sense, to use it as a tribune, or, in a ‘strategic’ sense, to win positions and point to changes within the State’s institutional framework). That is not and has not been our decision, but neither do we intend to make a moral or “principled” criticism of those options. We do not encourage it because it does not correspond to our objectives or our strategy, which requires the role of working-class organizations and not their delegation to political representatives, and because it requires fighting against the State and not taking refuge in it.

The libertarian socialist organizations have struggled to relate efficiently to politics and electoral times. In general, we have observed that most of the libertarian socialist organizations have ignored or abstracted from the electoral conjunctures, criticizing the electoral form, but not the content of those projects. This has caused them to be in a position of marginality in the face of the main political debates of those moments.

We believe that today the emphasis should be placed both on the development of an anti-capitalist program with a feminist perspective and on the development of the political capacity of the working-class organizations that allows them to challenge the way in which the production and the reproduction of social life are organized. Both elements, programmatic and strategic, are fundamental for social movements and political organizations to direct their action in a defensive period against the conservative reaction of the international bourgeoisie, beyond electoral times, but without abstaining from the political debate that opens at those moments.

EGL: Recently, there has been a wave of feminist struggles in South America, particularly in Argentina and Chile, including the taking of schools and mass demonstrations on reproductive rights. How have the libertarian socialists participated in these struggles and how does feminism spread its theory and its practice at a general level?

J/P: Libertarian socialist organizations have been an integral part of the feminist movements in Latin America and in Chile in particular. In fact, feminist militancy has come to exert, in certain moments— like the present one— a role as spokesperson and an articulation of the main social currents in the feminist movement.

However, it is difficult to talk about feminism because, as you know, there are many currents, which sometimes pose contradictory strategies. For Solidarity, there have been highly relevant lessons in recent years, which have been nourished by the mobilization experiences of what was NiUnaMenos (“Not one [woman] less”) and its process of political purification, in which the militant feminists of different organizations were questioned, and of the debates that arose in later formations. This allowed us to refine our own theoretical and political views, which have been transforming our organization into its fundamental strategic guidelines, from the very way in which we understand reality. Specifically, we have opted for the view of a unitary theory, which raises the basic premise that reality is a single thing and that there are not several systems of oppression (by gender, race, or class), but rather it is about different facets of the same social reality and that, therefore, must be confronted and overcome unitarily. Solidarity is committed to the unity of the working class and recognizes in feminism a potential articulator of the class that is tremendous. This potential is given by proposing a political project that recognizes internal differences within the class and that aims to overcome the logic of competition and privilege that occurs in it.

The participation of Chilean libertarian socialists in feminist struggles began to get stronger during the mobilizations of 2011, and that same development ended up leading to a questioning of the reality of the organizations themselves. From that moment until now, in every feminist movement, there has been libertarian presence and participation.

Today, no leftist organization would dare to set aside or ignore feminist struggles. But it often happens that their way of approaching it is to leave those tasks to individuals within organizations, delegating them that role as “proper to women” and establishing specific organic spaces as feminist fronts or tables. The commitment, still incomplete, of Solidarity is to take the challenges posed by feminism to its ultimate consequences, which means transforming our readings of reality, our strategy and tactics, and the programmatic development that we see in different struggles, whether they are called feminist or not. In all of this, it is the compañeras (women-identified comrades) who have taken the lead, and we believe that it is fine that they should, but we also believe that the struggle should involve all of us.

EGL: In Latin America, many libertarian socialists have proposed a theory and practice of building “popular power.” What is popular power and what forms has it adopted in practice?

J/P: In Latin America, popular power has been a strategic slogan that has crossed the visions of broad sectors of the anti-capitalist left. There are at least two ideas of popular power. One is popular power understood as the process of radical democratization of state institutions in the hands of a socialist government, as was proposed by Popular Unity (Unidad Popular) in Chile between 1970-1973 or the Bolivarian Revolution under the leadership of Hugo Chávez. It is a process of linking the bases of the people to a transformative political process through a transfer of power “from above.”

But in those same and other processes, and throughout the experiences of struggle of the peoples of Latin America, it is possible to find a conception of popular power “from below,” in those moments in which the political and economic crisis pose to the working class a more radical task: to develop processes of political and economic self-organization in which self-management and self-representation appear as short-term objectives. This is how forms of popular power are developed “from below,” such as the Industrial Cordons in Chile in 1972-1973, which, from the left, aimed to deepen the socialist transformations of the Allende government and to prepare a major offensive against the bourgeoisie. This self-managed current of popular power emerges in the revolutionary processes from the Paris Commune (1871) onwards, passing the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and the Spanish Revolution of 1936-1939, including the forms of Zapatista self-organization promoted by the EZLN and the wave of popular assemblies in Argentina in 2001.

For libertarian socialists, popular power is a central strategic hypothesis, insofar as it guides us with respect to ways of organizing ourselves, the source of a truly socialist democracy and the way in which a communist program is constructed and conquered. In Latin America, popular power has been a contemporary way of understanding the ancient anarchist project of self-management, integrating the historical lessons of the peasant and worker struggles of our peoples. It is important to note that the idea of ​​popular power can lead to problematic positions that ignore the need for a political confrontation with the power of the State, ending in the creation of social bubbles that abandon the construction of a social and political power capable of carrying out a revolution. The challenge, then, is to frame the construction of forms of popular power in a revolutionary strategy aimed at victory over the enemy.

Special thanks to Mackenzie Rae who provided copy editing for this article.

For additional reading we recommend the following piece by a Black Rose/Rosa Negra member “Socialism Will Be Free, Or It Will Not Be At All! – An Introduction to Libertarian Socialism” and our strategy and analysis piece “Popular Power In a Time of Reaction: Strategy for Social Struggle.

Libertarian communism began to reemerge in Chile at the end of the 1990s, and in 1999 the Anarchist Communist Unification Congress (CUAC) was founded, which would be the first political organization of this resurgence.
Juan & Pablo, Solidaridad

Libertarian Socialism in South America: A Roundtable Interview, Part II, Argentina

In the United States, growing segments of the population are undergoing a period of profound politicization and polarization. Political elites are struggling to maintain control as increasing numbers of people seek out alternatives on the left and the right. In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, political organizations on the left have grown significantly, most notably expressed in the explosive growth of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). Meanwhile, the Trump administration has joined other far-right governments emerging around the globe, emboldening fascist forces in the streets. These developments have sparked widespread debate on the nature of socialism and its distinct flavors within and outside the US.

Among the various branches within the broad socialist tradition, libertarian socialism is possibly the least understood. For many people in the US, libertarian socialism sounds like a contradiction in terms. The corrosive influence of the Cold War has distorted our understanding of socialism, while the explicit hijacking of the term “libertarian” by right-wing forces has stripped it of its roots within the socialist-communist camp. Outside the exceptional case of the US, libertarianism is widely understood to be synonymous with anarchism or anti-state socialism. In Latin America in particular, libertarian socialists have played a critical role in popular struggles across the region, from mass student movements to the recent wave of feminist struggles. To expand and enrich the current debate on socialism in the US, we spoke with several militants from political organizations in the tradition of libertarian socialism in Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, exploring the history, theory and practice of libertarian socialism.

Due to the length of responses, we will be publishing this roundtable interview in installments (Part 1 here, in Spanish and in English). For Part 2, we spoke with militants in Acción Socialista Libertaria / Libertarian Socialist Action from Argentina.

We also wanted to thank everyone who contributed to our Building Bridges of International Solidarity Fundraiser which made this interview series possible.

—Introduction, interview and translation by Enrique Guerrero-López

Enrique Guerrero-López (EGL): Can you introduce yourself, tell us the name of your organization, and give a short summary of its origins and your main work?

ASL: We are ASL (Acción Socialista Libertaria/Libertarian Socialist Action). We have militant nuclei in La Plata (Buenos Aires), Greater Buenos Aires Sur, Greater Buenos Aires West, Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, and Cordoba.

Our formal introduction to the public was in November 2015, although we had been meeting, debating, and planning shared militancy since at least 2012. We could say that the original nucleus of ASL was the confluence of comrades with prior political and social militancy. 1 Some of that came from the political experience of OSL (Organización Socialista Libertaria/Libertarian Socialist Organization) during the ‘90s and until 2009. [It also came from:]

Other anarchists with piquetera militancy in the MTD (Movimiento de Trabajadores Desocupados/Movement of Unemployed Workers) May 1st and the Movement of Workers Norberto Salto, which, together with other movements, make up the FOL (Frente de Organizaciónes en Lucha/Front of Organizations in Struggle) in 2006. 2

A nucleus of comrades with militancy in the Colectivo Desde el Pié/From the Foot Collective (a radical interdisciplinary research collective based in the physical and natural sciences). Others who worked in the Red Libertario (Libertarian Network) in Buenos Aires as well as in feminist spaces. With this primary nucleus, we combined the different experiences and trajectories to build common agreements and politics.

We think that the construction of a Libertarian Political Organization with roots in, and development of its militancy within, the class struggle should be something permanent and continuous, which is a patient task of developing organizations, programs, strategies, and novel tactics, but with a strong sense of belonging to the central nuclei of anarchism. In this sense, we perceive ourselves as an Organization still under construction and with varying degrees of popular insertion. 3

We have militants active in various popular struggles— in territorial, environmental, feminist, union, student, and human rights— in addition to developing propaganda, dissemination, and training activities.

EGL: What are the roots of libertarian socialism in South America?

ASL: In South America, anarchism established itself as a current in the labor and popular movements early and solidly. Especially in the large cities with access to the ports, the great arrival of European immigrants brought in their saddlebags an experience of organization and struggle. They arrived as protagonists of the revolts of 1848, persecuted communards of Paris, and members of sections of the First International.

In Argentina, the arrival of anarchist militancy is particularly important. We already see around 1858 the formation of the first mutual aid societies and, by the end of 1870, the first unions, newspapers, and libertarian groups were established.

They found a very unequal, unjust, and conflict-ridden society. “Success,” then, was not so much based on the capacity of those “coming,” but on what was already here. A libertarian socialist current would become, in Argentina, broadly majoritarian, in the left and in the bosom of the labor movement until 1930, with emblematic organizations such as FORA (Federación Obrera Regional Argentina/Federation of Argentine Regional Workers). Until then, anarchist and worker militancy were fused in the same organizations.

Repression and economic changes on the one hand— and the lack of actual political-theoretical updating and the appearance of new political actors (the Communist Party, Peronism, etc.) on the other— led libertarian socialism to a crisis of great proportions. In this context, specifically political organizations emerge within anarchism. The ALA (Alianza Libertaria Argentina) between 1923 and 1932; the Spartacus Labor Alliance between 1935 and 1940; the FACA/FLA (Anarcho-Communist Federation of Argentina) between 1932 and the 1950s; and then, under the name of the Libertarian Federation of Argentina, surviving to the present; and the Libertarian Resistance between 1969 and 1978 are examples that we see as antecedents in our country.

They theorized as political organizations with different spaces of social insertion— worker, student, peasant, and neighborhood— assuming the loss of libertarian hegemony from the past and trying to adjust their tactics and their propaganda to re-develop a solid libertarian current within the field of popular struggle.

In that sense, we take three central and transversal axes of our current as distinctive elements: classist, feminist, and libertarian practice.

EGL: What differentiates libertarian socialism from other branches of socialism?

ASL: We like to define ourselves as part of the revolutionary left, as a libertarian current within it with its particularities and similarities.

Our hypothesis on the development of the experience of libertarian socialism in the field of popular struggle is to be able to construct a mass political alternative that challenges the delegative, authoritarian, vertical, and patriarchal representative forms.

In that sense, we take three central and transversal4 axes of our current as distinctive elements: classist5, feminist, and libertarian practice. Our base-building tries to develop disruptive and democratic elements, tries to prioritize consciousness instead of disputes over the mere formal direction of popular organizations. Another important element is the pedagogical notion of direct action on the path of building a Direct Power of the People, enhancing the political practice of our class.

A third vector is to develop an integral anti-patriarchal politics that cuts across all the experiences of the masses, beyond the specific tasks of the women’s and queer movement itself— the struggle for legal abortion, self-defense against femicide, etc. In addition, the questioning of the notion of bourgeois democracy as a space for resolution or improvement of the living conditions of our class seems central to us— and instead trying to develop experiences of direct, democratic, and bottom-up management. In that sense, we try to develop a questioning of the notions of the State as a site of struggle and of the electoral route as a “unique” space of specifically political action.

EGL: What role does political organization play within social movements and how does that fit into your vision of libertarian socialist politics?

ASL: There are different visions on the left regarding the intervention of political organizations in social movements.

Even within militant anarchism (setting aside individualists, or those who espouse more “countercultural” aspects), we could say that there are at least three positions on the issue: those who see the “libertarian political group” as a space solely for propaganda or diffusion and where agreements are lax and there is almost no intervention in social movements; those who do not see the need to develop a strictly political space and combine common political-social aspects in grassroots militancy; and, finally, a current like ours that sees dual organizationalism as central: the political and the social.

Our vision of the Libertarian Political Organization tries to take lessons from the historical experiences that we pointed out previously, also incorporating the experience of diverse organizations within so-called “Latin American especifismo,” such as the FAU (Uruguayan Anarchist Federation) since the ‘60s or the OSL (Socialist Organization Libertaria) in Argentina in the ‘90s and 2000s. Also, the experience of the [platformist] Russian exiles of Dielo Truda, with Makhno and Archinoff as visible heads, who proposed a General Union of the Anarchists and an Organizational Platform.

Considering our relationship with social organizations, we consider our political organization as an application of the coordination of our popular militancy, of the development of libertarian militants, and of the strategic debate of our specific tasks, considering ourselves as just a nucleus of a broader construction in development:

- Coordination of popular militancy as a pedagogical and dynamic space of our popular insertion— advocating political independence of grassroots organizations, but working to enhance all that is classist, feminist, and libertarian in its midst. Promoting the defense of popular rights and freedoms and, at the same time, prefiguring in concrete and tangible practices the society for which we are fighting. Defining common tactics and strategies of the different militancies and coordinating our militancy in the sense of developing People’s Direct Power as a tool of rupture with the current capitalist, patriarchal, and state order.
- Development of libertarian militants: We understand this as something dynamic and with diverse angles— political practice with certain values ​​and feelings; theoretical training through debates, readings, and workshops; the range of our responsibilities in political and social organizations; debates with other political currents; the production of propaganda and the dissemination of materials, etc.
- Strategic debate of our specific tasks: We don’t see this as separate from the characteristic levels of development within the social organizations where we participate or where we build. Objectives such as the self-activity of the masses, self-government of the workers, or class independence are not formal or rhetorical questions. We must link them to the work of social movements today.

In that sense, we see Political Organization as a push, an encouragement, a support for the autonomous development of popular movements— with more responsibilities and no privileges— and acting, in certain moments of withdrawal, as a rearguard that safeguards the objectives of radical transformation.

EGL: In the US, there is widespread debate over electoral politics on the left. How do libertarian socialists in South America relate to electoral politics?

ASL: Historically, the most important organizations and political currents of the left in Argentina have participated electorally, from the old Socialist Party since the end of the 19th century to the Communist Party since the ‘30s of the last century. Perhaps the exception has been the PRT (Workers’ Revolutionary Party) in the ‘70s, an important formation from Trotskyism and Guevarism that developed the armed struggle and did not participate electorally in its boom moment.

Since the return of democracy in 1983, the most important anti-capitalist left organizations in Argentina have been those of Trotskyism. All of them have developed, during more than thirty years, a sustained policy of electoral intervention. Sometimes as a forum for debate, at other times as propaganda, and, since the formation of the FIT (Left and Workers’ Front), an alliance between various leftist groups, they have had small “electoral successes,” amounting to around 3-5% of the national electorate, winning national and provincial deputies and references to certain “tribunes of the people.”

Anarchism and its organizations in Argentina have never developed sectors that have participated electorally in bourgeois democracy, although, in recent years, there has been a paradox with respect to our framework of alliances. Sectors with which we share social militancy, tactical agreements of intervention, or even areas of political coordination have progressively chosen to start participating in different electoral campaigns. These include some in the aforementioned FIT and others in center-left or allied formations of sectors of Kirchnerism. We even find bands of organizations that adopt these tactics with sustained sympathies toward our current or even coming from anarchism.

This forced us to debate with them, more from the tactical and political conjuncture, without falling into closed positions and abstract abstentionism.

We can see three central debates here. On the one hand, the electoral issue is seen as a possible “leap to politics,” an outgrowth and a response to overcome corporatism and trade unionism from social militancy. Given this, our position is that the need for that “leap” is correct, but that circumscribing political intervention to electoral intervention discounts politics, puts it in the enemy’s arena, with the tactics of the class enemy and its instruments. We continue to maintain that bourgeois democracy is the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie, an instrument of consensus for capitalist and patriarchal exploitation. We are interested in developing political campaigns for local and national intervention, popular proposals, etc., even with the presentation of bills, as was the case of the Law of Voluntary Interruption of Pregnancy, where broad sectors developed from below, and democratically and nationally, a great mass campaign.

The other aspect is our questioning of bourgeois democracy and the need to articulate an Extra-Parliamentary Political Alternative that serves as a reference point for social movements in struggle, the women’s movement and dissidence, the classist currents among the workers’ and students’ movement, etc., and a political coordination with an agenda of intervention within different currents of the revolutionary, libertarian, and autonomous left. 6 We cannot develop a radical and political critique of the instruments of consensus of the bourgeoisie if we accept their game outright.

Finally, our tactical criticism of electoral intervention is analyzed in light of the political, militant, and economic resources that are destined for electoral campaigns by sister organizations. What will result, sooner rather than later, will be carelessness or an instrumentalist appreciation of grassroots militancy and social organization — a conservativization of bold or disruptive methods of political intervention, especially by those that use direct action as a method of intervention.

EGL: Recently there’s been a wave of feminist struggles in South America, particularly in Argentina and Chile, including school occupations and mass demonstrations for reproductive rights. How have libertarian socialists participated in these struggles and how does feminism inform your overall theory and practice?

TASL: It’s interesting to trace the historical background of the feminist movement in the region to analyze the fundamental libertarian influence, from the experience of the newspaper La voz de la Mujer, initiated by the anarcha-feminist Virginia Bolten, to the formation of Free Women in the ‘80s in Buenos Aires or the first “Women’s Commissions” with a strong intervention by our anarchist comrades in the piqueteros movements in the late ‘90s to the present.

Throughout this stage we have actively participated, even with our modest forces. We have done it in the day-to-day and, of course, in the streets, in those multitudinous and historic days of struggle: in the demonstrations of Ni Una Menos, and in the work stoppages of women, on March 8th and November 25th, as well as in the days of encampment and direct action in the National Congress to approve the law for voluntary interruption of pregnancy.

But also, daily intervening in several specific organizations: in pre- and post-abortion popular councils, in the National Campaign against Violence against Women; in the Campaign for the Right to Legal, Safe and Free Abortion; in the National Meetings of Women, now renamed Plurinational Encounter of Women, Lesbians, Transvestites, and Trans [People]; in specific feminist organizations and in the various commissions and areas of popular organizations where we are active.

From the point of particular political intervention, we’re initiating a Libertarian Feminist Assembly together with comrades from other libertarian organizations and anarchist militants in unions, social movements, and feminist struggles, as well as intellectuals and students. The idea is to think about our practice, to come to an agreement on transversal policies of intervention, and to draw up a line to act from our point of view in the current conjuncture.

In that sense, as ASL, we have edited a document to contribute to a Strategic Definition of Libertarian Feminism. In it, we characterize the women’s movement and dissidence as clearly the most politically dynamic sector of the working class these days, as it questions not only the patriarchal and capitalist oppressions within personal and daily relationships, but also the institutions of the State, and even within social organizations.

EGL: In South America, many libertarian socialists have put forward a theory and practice of building “popular power.” What is popular power and what forms has it taken in practice?

ASL: Like the majority of left militants with social insertion in Latin America, libertarian socialism also deals with the construction of Popular Power. We have tried to polemicize the term in a booklet that tries to systematize our positions on the matter since, within that wide concept, you can see traces of the most varied currents and politics. Some of them enrich and others, in our humble understanding, confuse.

For ASL, the construction of Popular Power is a complex, permanent, and contested strategy. Given the multiplicity of meanings that have been given, for a while now, we began to define this strategy as “Direct Power of the People,” since it seems to us that it is much closer to a libertarian vision of its construction.

We say that the construction of Direct Power of the People (DPP) is complex, because it tries to find the tools and seeds of liberating practices in the objective conditions in which we develop our militancy; permanent, because we don’t think of development in stagnant stages or that every political moment is the same for the development of the DPP; and contested, because it tries to fight against the vertical, patriarchal, and liberal senses in political and mass construction.

We think that the development of the DPP must go hand-in-hand with experience, with a reading of the moment and of the forces that we, as a class, have. Disagreeing as much with the “escape from power” as with the “taking of power,” we consider the DPP strategy as building a power from the oppressed sectors and from the working people with which to materially prefigure that libertarian socialism, from below and without the State or Patriarchy, that we want to build.

In the current conjuncture throughout the region, we are going through a stage of DPP that relies more on Resistance and Organization than on significant advances.

The need to defend the historical gains of our class and the movement of women and sexual dissidents becomes central at this stage. Therefore, we promote unitary organization from below, in the trade unions and political-union organizations that the masses recognize as legitimate for their defense: unions, social and protest organizations, student centers, neighborhood associations, and feminist associations and councils.

On the other hand, the debate about the questioning of bourgeois democracy as the “natural” political space for our interventions seems central to us; trying to develop and promote local instances of democracy and direct action: campaigns, multisectoral coordinators, breaking with corporatism, etc.

Here, we see experimentation in the management of resources wrested from the struggle in the territorial sphere as fundamental, the possibility of anti-bureaucratic efforts in certain Delegate Bodies or internal union boards to defend conquests, and class solidarity. Believing in the practice of our forces, we are demonstrating that no crisis can be resolved by those who generated it: the State and the bosses.

Special thanks to Mackenzie Rae who provided copy editing for this article.

The first part in this series, “Libertarian Socialism in South America: A Roundtable Interview, Part I, Chile,” is here. Part III is coming soon.

For additional reading we recommend the following piece by a Black Rose/Rosa Negra member “Socialism Will Be Free, Or It Will Not Be At All! – An Introduction to Libertarian Socialism” and our strategy and analysis piece “Popular Power In a Time of Reaction: Strategy for Social Struggle.

We continue to maintain that bourgeois democracy is the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie... We cannot develop a radical and political critique of the instruments of consensus of the bourgeoisie if we accept their game outright.
Acción Socialista Libertaria

Socialismo Libertario en Sur America: Una Entrevista Mesa Redonda, Parte I, Chile

En los Estados Unidos, segmentos crecientes de la población están atravesando un período de profunda politización y polarización. Las elites políticas luchan por mantener el control a medida que un número creciente de personas busca alternativas de izquierda y derecha. A raíz de las elecciones de 2016, las organizaciones políticas de la izquierda han crecido significativamente, sobre todo expresadas en el crecimiento explosivo de los socialistas demócratas de América (DSA). Mientras tanto, Trump se ha unido a otros gobiernos de extrema derecha que están surgiendo en todo el mundo, alentando a las fuerzas fascistas en las calles. Estos desarrollos han provocado un amplio debate sobre la naturaleza del socialismo y sus distintos sabores dentro y fuera de los EE. UU.

Entre las diversas ramas dentro de la amplia tradición socialista, el socialismo libertario es posiblemente el menos comprendido. Para muchas personas en los Estados Unidos, el socialismo libertario suena como una contradicción en los términos. La influencia corrosiva de la Guerra Fría ha distorsionado nuestra comprensión del socialismo, mientras que el secuestro explícito del término libertario por las fuerzas de derecha lo ha despojado de sus raíces dentro del campo socialista / comunista. Fuera del caso excepcional de los EE. UU., se entiende ampliamente que libertario es sinónimo de anarquismo o socialismo antiestatal. En América Latina en particular, los socialistas libertarios han desempeñado un papel fundamental en las luchas populares en toda la región, desde los movimientos estudiantiles en masa hasta la reciente ola de luchas feministas. Para expandir y enriquecer el debate actual sobre el socialismo en los EE. UU., Hablamos con varios militantes de organizaciones políticas en la tradición del socialismo libertario en Brasil, Argentina y Chile para explorar la historia, teoría y práctica del socialismo libertario.

Debido a la longitud de las respuestas, publicaremos esta entrevista de mesa redonda a plazos. Para la parte 1, hablamos con Juan y Pablo de Solidaridad en Chile. También quisimos agradecer a todos los que contribuyeron a nuestra recaudación de fondos Construyendo puentes de solidaridad internacional que hizo posible esta serie de entrevistas.

-Introducción, traducción y entrevista por Enrique Guerrero-López

Enrique Guerrero-López (EGL): ¿Puede presentarse, decirnos el nombre de su organización y un breve resumen de sus orígenes y su trabajo principal?

Juan y Pablo, Solidaridad (J/P): Solidaridad, anteriormente llamada “Solidaridad, Federación Comunista Libertaria” nace a partir de un proceso político que se denominó “Congreso Comunista Libertario”, que se produjo entre fines del 2013 e inicios del 2016. Este proceso consistió en un reagrupamiento de las corrientes comunistas libertarias en Chile, luego de una profunda crisis política que vivimos entre el 2011 y 2013. Se trató de un periodo sumamente rico de experiencias, un momento en que la clase trabajadora llevaba a cabo una intensa actividad a través de distintos movimientos sociales, en conflictos estudiantiles, conflictos socioambientales y en cierta medida sindicales.

Si bien a fines del siglo XIX y principios del XX, anarquismo era la principal corriente política dentro de la clase trabajadora en Chile y en gran parte del mundo, esta influencia se fue perdiendo ya para los años 30’, quedando como una corriente marginal hacia la mitad del siglo XX -salvo algunos momentos excepcionales como la huelga general del año 56. Pese a su decadencia, algunos de sus elementos tácticos y estratégicos subsisten en el sindicalismo militante del siglo XX.

El comunismo libertario se comienza a rearticular en Chile a fines de los años 90’, siendo fundado el año 1999 el Congreso de Unificación Anarco Comunista (CUAC), el que sería la primera organización política de este resurgimiento. A partir de ese momento, se genera una larga y rica experiencia de trabajo políticos en distintos sectores y movimientos sociales: territoriales, sindicales, y con un fuerte crecimiento en lo estudiantil. El CUAC como organización duró pocos años, pero a partir de su quiebre su crearon nuevas organizaciones que se fueron subdividiendo y rejuntando en los años siguientes. Estos quiebres eran la expresión de distintas tendencias que se iban formando al interior de esta rama común. A comienzos del año 2010 se realiza un primer congreso en que se convoca a varias de esas organizaciones para evaluar todo lo que se había avanzado a 10 años de eso momento. Ahí participaron el Frente de Estudiantes Libertarios (FEL), y tres organizaciones que convergerían en la Federación Comunista Libertaria (FCL). Es notable la ausencia de la Organización Comunista Libertaria (OCL), heredera directa del CUAC. Parte de las conclusiones de ese encuentro fueron el acierto de la idea de “inserción social”, que supuso devolver el anarquismo a la lucha de clases, participar desde dentro de los distintos conflictos en que estuviera participando la clase trabajadora. Ya para el año 2011, la influencia de esta corriente política alcanzaba uno de sus puntos más altos. En el periodo entre el 2011 y 2013 ganamos visibilidad pública, incidencia real dentro de distintos movimientos sociales y comenzamos a ser considerados como una corriente a ser tomada en cuenta dentro del espectro político. Contábamos con centenares de militantes, presencia en distintos conflictos sociales, teníamos expresiones muralistas, revistas, medios de comunicación social, etc. Solamente por dar un ejemplo, el 2013 se gana la presidencia de la principal federación estudiantil del país (la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile) y se llena de titulares de prensa con notas acerca del anarquismo y el feminismo. Pero eso fue el cénit. Nos vimos en la obligación de actualizar nuestra política, asumir nuevos desafíos y nos encontramos que había muchas cuestiones para las que nos encontrábamos preparados/as.

El periodo siguiente fue encontrarnos con un déficit de estrategia. Producto de las movilizaciones sociales de ese tiempo y el descrédito de los principales partidos políticos, se fue reconfigurando todo el espectro político. Es decir, no fue algo que únicamente nos afectó a la tradición comunista libertaria, sino a todas las organizaciones, tanto de derecha como de izquierda. En nuestro caso, impactó fuertemente el resurgimiento del feminismo, que interpeló las desigualdades y la opresión de género tanto en la sociedad en general como también dentro de las propias organizaciones de la izquierda.

Ante esa carencia de estrategia ante los nuevos desafíos, las distintas organizaciones del comunismo libertario en Chile comenzaron a optar por caminos diferentes. Una parte importante, que ahora está representada por las organizaciones Socialismo y Libertad (SOL) y la Izquierda Libertaria (IL), se encaminaron a una estrategia llamada de “ruptura democrática”, que puso en su centro la inserción y disputa de la institucionalidad del Estado. Estas organizaciones están hoy dentro del Frente Amplio (FA), un conglomerado de organizaciones socialdemócratas, liberales y también de izquierda, que intentan ser un nuevo polo progresista en Chile y que han tenido gran rendimiento electoral. Creemos que expresa un fenómeno político similar al del DSA en los EEUU.

Por el otro lado, quedamos un número importante de militantes, provenientes de distintas organizaciones libertarias y también de otras tendencias (marxistas críticos y libertarios, feministas anticapitalistas) que fuimos distanciándonos de esas apuestas, pero sin todavía poder presentar un proyecto alternativo. Ante esa necesidad iniciamos el Congreso Comunista Libertario, que duró dos años y dio nacimiento a Solidaridad como organización. Sin embargo, no fue hasta el año 2017 que ese proceso pudo cuajar en una acción política unitaria, con despliegue en distintos conflictos políticos y sociales.

Actualmente, nuestra participación se está dando en distintos movimientos sociales multisectoriales: en el movimiento feminista, a través de la coordinadora 8 de marzo, en el movimiento salud para todos y todas (MSPT), en el movimiento No + AFP que lucha por un nuevo sistema de pensiones y, con una participación menor entre docentes y estudiantes. En todos estos movimientos nuestra militancia ocupa, sin falsa humildad, un lugar destacado, incidiendo en las perspectivas políticas que asumen esos movimientos. Nuestra militancia actual no es muy numerosa, pero hemos optado por un crecimiento cualitativo que posteriormente se ha ido expresando en crecimiento cuantitativo. A raíz de una evaluación positiva de ese despliegue hemos decidido dar nuevos pasos y comenzar a articular un referente político anticapitalista con otras organizaciones con las que nos hemos ido encontrando en la práctica, en esos movimientos. Esta coalición mantendrá la independencia de cada organización, pero sumará esfuerzos para ser una alternativa a un espectro mucho más amplio de la clase trabajadora, intentando orientar desde una crítica anticapitalista la oposición política y social al gobierno.

EGL: ¿Cuáles son las raíces (orígenes) del socialismo libertario en América del Sur?

J/P: Podríamos decir que el capitalismo se expandió hacia todo el mundo con sus propias contradicciones. Desde el inicio de la colonización, pasando por los periodos republicanos, siempre hubo grandes conflictos sociales de resistencia y emancipación desde los sectores oprimidos. Pero no fue hasta fines del siglo XIX que llegaron a nuestro continente inmigrantes que habían participado en procesos de lucha de clases en Europa (y habían experimentado sus respectivas derrotas). Estos inmigrantes trajeron con perspectivas más claramente anarquistas -junto a otras corrientes socialistas que también llegaron. No trajeron únicamente “ideas”, sino que trajeron también experiencia real e histórica de esos procesos, que podían conectar perfectamente con la propia experiencia de lucha de la clase trabajadora en el continente americano. Por eso, en el caso de Chile, en un inicio los principales núcleos anarquistas se constituyeron en las ciudades cercanas a los puertos.

Al igual que gran parte del mundo, el anarquismo se constituyó hacia inicios del siglo XX como la principal corriente obrera de Chile. No obstante, convivían con otras corrientes en los círculos obreros y estudiantiles. La corriente libertaria tuvo particularmente importancia en la constitución de las sociedades de resistencia, proto-sindicatos que devolverían a la organización de la clase trabajadora una perspectiva clasista y de lucha, frente a otro tipo de agrupaciones de la época como las mutuales. Algunos de los grandes hitos de lucha obrera de esa época, como lo fue la huelga minera que culminó en la matanza de Santa María de Iquique (donde murieron alrededor de 3600 obreros chilenos, bolivianos, peruanos, entre otras nacionalidades), fueron lideradas por anarquistas.

EGL: ¿Qué diferencia al socialismo libertario de otras ramas del socialismo?

J/P: Entendemos que las distintas corrientes del socialismo representan diferentes lecciones que ha sacado la clase trabajadora a través de su experiencia de la lucha a lo largo de la historia. El anarquismo representa una tendencia libertaria al interior del gran complejo político-ideológico del socialismo, que se distingue de otras corrientes socialistas principalmente por tres elementos: el énfasis estratégico que pone en el protagonismo político de las masas en los procesos revolucionarios, a través de la acción directa de sus organizaciones en la expropiación del poder económico y político de la burguesía mediante un proceso de autogestión y liberación de las fuerzas creadoras de la humanidad; una crítica históricamente situada del Estado-nación como forma política del capitalismo, y por lo tanto la necesidad de crear órganos de poder popular en el proceso de la lucha de clases; y su estrategia organizativa dual, en la que las organizaciones políticas de la clase trabajadora cumplen un rol facilitador y organizador junto a las masas organizadas. Cabe destacar también su temprano interés en una visión compleja de la clase trabajadora y el campesinado, reconociendo las diferencias y desigualdades raciales y de género en su interior, lo que lleva al anarquismo a estar a la vanguardia de la sindicalización de mujeres y afrodescendientes en los países donde tuvo un arraigo popular fuerte.

En términos negativos, el socialismo libertario ha tenido dificultades para articular una crítica política realista de la lucha de clases, empantanado a veces en formas dogmáticas del análisis y en un sectarismo que lo mantuvo en posiciones de debilidad táctica y estratégica en momentos claves de los procesos revolucionarios del siglo XX. Sus disputas con el marxismo han sido sobredimensionadas y extrapoladas más allá de sus coyunturas específicas, lo que ha llevado a sectores del anarquismo a posiciones cómodas, identitarias y marginales.

EGL: ¿Qué papel juega la organización política dentro de los movimientos sociales y cómo encaja eso en su visión de la política socialista libertaria?

J/P: La organización política, como la concebimos, debe ser una dinamizadora y orientadora de las luchas de la clase trabajadora. Los movimientos sociales son una forma que adquiere esa lucha, aunque no la única. Creemos que el rol de orientación es siempre en tanto somos parte de la clase trabajadora y funcionamos como una síntesis posible de su experiencia como proyecto emancipador. En este sentido, que nuestro proyecto de sociedad sea el de un socialismo sin Estado, de autoorganización de la clase y de socialización de las tareas productivas y reproductivas, no es solamente porque nos parezca un ideal más bello, sino porque es coherente con la propia historia de lucha de la clase trabajadora, siendo la autogestión y el poder popular componentes estratégicos para vencer.

La organización de la clase trabajadora puede tomar muchas direcciones; tantas como sus propias tendencias internas, las cuales incluyen potenciales orientaciones conservadoras o fascistas. Nuestro rol es asumir que hay una disputa por esa orientación y presentar el proyecto más coherente con las aspiraciones de la clase. Creemos, por lo demás, que esto es una responsabilidad. Abstraerse de la tarea de influir equivale a dejar vía libre al reformismo o, peor aún, al fascismo. Es una responsabilidad de nuestros tiempos constituir alternativas viables de una nueva sociedad que supere las relaciones capitalistas. Y eso se consigue luchando, organizadamente, con objetivos y estrategias claras. Por eso planteamos que es una necesidad que el socialismo libertario como proyecto se encarne en organizaciones políticas que estén dispuestas a ‘ensuciarse las manos’, siendo parte de esos procesos.

Pensamos también que la organización política debe incentivar que las organizaciones más importantes de la clase desarrollen programas de transformación de la sociedad, abogando por su diversidad interna. Por ello es imposible un proyecto revolucionario anticapitalista que no sea a la vez feminista; que plantee la superación de los privilegios de género o de raza. Creemos que la superación del capitalismo requiere la unidad más amplia de la clase y eso solamente se obtiene considerando todas sus diferencias internas.

EGL: En los EE. UU., Existe un amplio debate sobre la política electoral en la izquierda. ¿Cómo se relacionan los socialistas libertarios en América del Sur con la política electoral?

J/P: Como existen distintas corrientes políticas dentro de la clase trabajadora, las estrategias electorales seguirán siendo una opción, aunque no lo queramos. Como Solidaridad partimos de ese reconocimiento: siempre habrá una izquierda electoral, que internamente podrá tener muchas diferencias (elecciones en sentido ‘táctico’ para utilizarla como tribuna o en sentido ‘estratégico’ para ganar posiciones y apuntar a cambios dentro de la institucionalidad del Estado). Esa no es ni ha sido nuestra opción, pero tampoco pretendemos realizar una crítica moral o ‘de principio’ a esas opciones. No lo impulsamos porque no se corresponde ni con nuestros objetivos ni con nuestra estrategia, que requiere del protagonismo de las organizaciones de la clase trabajadora y no su delegación a representantes políticos y, porque requiere luchar contra el Estado y no refugiarse en él.

A las organizaciones socialistas libertarias les ha costado relacionarse de forma eficiente con la política y los tiempos electorales. En general, hemos observado que la mayoría de las organizaciones socialistas libertarias han ignorado o se han abstraído de las coyunturas electorales, criticando la forma electoral, pero no el contenido de esos proyectos. Esto ha provocado que queden en una posición de marginalidad frente a los principales debates políticos de esos momentos.

Creemos que en la actualidad el énfasis debe estar puesto tanto en el desarrollo de un programa anticapitalista con perspectiva feminista y en el desarrollo de la capacidad política de las organizaciones de la clase trabajadora que le permita disputar la forma en que se organiza la producción y la reproducción de la vida social. Ambos elementos, programático y estratégico, son fundamentales para que los movimientos sociales y las organizaciones políticas orienten su acción en un periodo defensivo contra la reacción conservadora de la burguesía internacional, más allá de los tiempos electorales, pero sin ausentarse del debate político que se abre en esos momentos.

EGL: Recientemente, ha habido una ola de luchas feministas en América del Sur, particularmente en Argentina y Chile, incluyendo toma de escuelas y manifestaciones masivas sobre derechos reproductivos. ¿Cómo han participado lxs socialistas libertarios en estas luchas y cómo el feminismo difunde su teoría y su práctica a nivel general?

J/P: Las organizaciones socialistas libertarias han sido parte integrante de los movimientos feministas en américa latina y en Chile en particular. Incluso, su militancia ha llegado a ejercer en ciertos momentos (como el actual) un rol de vocería y articulación de los principales referentes sociales del movimiento feminista.

No obstante, es complejo hablar “del feminismo” porque como ustedes saben, existen muchas corrientes, las que a veces plantean objetivos o al menos estrategias contradictorias entre sí. Para Solidaridad ha habido aprendizajes sumamente relevantes en los últimos años, que se han nutrido de las experiencias de movilización de lo que fue NiUnaMenos y su proceso de depuración política (en la que fueron interpeladas las feministas militantes de distintas organizaciones) y de los debates que surgieron en posteriores articulaciones. Ello permitió afinar nuestras propias miradas teóricas y políticas y es un hecho que ha estado transformando nuestra organización en sus lineamientos estratégicos fundamentales, desde la forma misma en que entendemos la realidad. Concretamente hemos apostado por la mirada de la teoría unitaria, que plantea la premisa básica que la realidad es una única cosa y que no existen varios sistemas de opresión (por género, raza o clase), sino que se trata de distintas facetas de una misma realidad social y que por ende, debe ser afrontada y superada unitariamente. Solidaridad apuesta por la unidad de la clase trabajadora y reconoce en el feminismo un potencial articulador de la clase que es tremendo. Ese potencial está dado por plantear un proyecto político que reconozca las diferencias internas al interior de la clase y que responda para superar las lógicas de competencia o privilegio que en ella se dan.

La participación del socialismo libertario chileno en las luchas feministas comienza a ser más fuerte a partir de las movilizaciones del 2011, y ese mismo desarrollo termina interpelando la realidad de las propias organizaciones. Desde ese momento hasta ahora, en todo movimiento feminista ha habido presencia y participación libertaria.

Hoy en día, ninguna organización de izquierda se atrevería a dejar de lado o a obviar las luchas feministas. Pero muchas veces sucede que su manera de abordarlo es a través de dejarle esas tareas a “las feministas” al interior de las organizaciones, delegándoles ese rol como “propio de las mujeres” y estableciendo espacios orgánicos específicos como frentes o mesas feministas. La apuesta -todavía incompleta- de Solidaridad es llevar los desafíos que nos plantea el feminismo hasta sus últimas consecuencias, lo que significa transformar nuestras lecturas de la realidad, nuestra estrategia y tácticas, y el desarrollo programático que veamos en distintas luchas, se llamen o no feministas. En todo ello, son las compañeras las que han llevado la delantera y creemos que está bien que así sea, pero también consideramos que la lucha nos debe involucrar a todos y a todas.

EGL: En América del Sur, muchos socialistas libertarixs han propuesto una teoría y una práctica para construir el “poder popular”. ¿Qué es el poder popular y qué formas ha adoptado en la práctica?

J/P: En América Latina, el poder popular ha sido una consigna estratégica que ha atravesado las visiones de amplios sectores de la izquierda anticapitalista. Existen al menos dos ideas sobre el poder popular. Un poder popular entendido como el proceso de democratización radical de las instituciones del Estado en manos de un gobierno socialista, tal como se propuso la Unidad Popular en Chile entre 1970-1973 o la Revolución Bolivariana bajo la conducción de Hugo Chávez. Se trata de un proceso de ingreso de las bases del pueblo a un proceso político transformador mediante una transferencia de poder “desde arriba”.

Pero en esos mismos y otros procesos, y a lo largo de las experiencias de lucha de los pueblos latinoamericanos, es posible encontrar una concepción de poder popular “desde abajo”, en aquellos momentos en los que las crisis políticas y económicas plantean a la clase trabajadora una tarea más radical: desarrollar procesos de auto-organización política y económica en las que la autogestión y la auto-representación aparecen como objetivos de corto plazo. Así es como se desarrollan formas de poder popular “desde abajo” como los Cordones Industriales en Chile en 1972-1973, que, desde la izquierda, apuntaban a profundizar las transformaciones socialistas del gobierno de Allende, y preparar una ofensiva mayor sobre la burguesía. Esta corriente autogestionaria del poder popular emerge en los procesos revolucionarios desde la Comuna de París (1871) en adelante, pasando las revoluciones rusas de 1905 y 1917, la Revolución Española de 1936-1939, incluso las formas de auto-organización zapatista impulsadas por el EZLN o la ola de asambleas populares en Argentina el 2001.

Para los y las socialistas libertarias, el poder popular es una hipótesis estratégica central, en la medida en que nos orienta con respecto a los modos de organizarnos, la fuente de una democracia realmente socialista y la forma en que se construye y conquista un programa comunista libertario. En América Latina, el poder popular ha sido una forma contemporánea de entender el antiguo proyecto anarquista de la autogestión, integrando las lecciones históricas de las luchas campesinas y obreras de nuestros pueblos. Es importante advertir que la idea de “poder popular” puede llevar a posiciones problemáticas que desconocen la necesidad de una confrontación política con el poder del Estado, terminando en la creación de “burbujas” sociales que abandonan la construcción de un poder social y político capaz de llevar a cabo una revolución. El desafío, entonces, es enmarcar la construcción de formas de poder popular en una estrategia revolucionaria que apunte a la victoria sobre el enemigo.

Si te gustó este artículo te recomendamos ejemplares de temática similar, “¡El socialismo será libre o no será!” y “Poder popular en tiempos de reacción: Estrategia para la lucha social.

Socialismo Libertario en Sur America: Una Entrevista Mesa Redonda, Parte II, Argentina

En los Estados Unidos, segmentos crecientes de la población están atravesando un período de profunda politización y polarización. Las elites políticas luchan por mantener el control a medida que un número creciente de personas busca alternativas de izquierda y derecha. A raíz de las elecciones de 2016, las organizaciones políticas de la izquierda han crecido significativamente, sobre todo expresadas en el crecimiento explosivo de los socialistas demócratas de América (DSA). Mientras tanto, Trump se ha unido a otros gobiernos de extrema derecha que están surgiendo en todo el mundo, alentando a las fuerzas fascistas en las calles. Estos desarrollos han provocado un amplio debate sobre la naturaleza del socialismo y sus distintos sabores dentro y fuera de los EE. UU.

Entre las diversas ramas dentro de la amplia tradición socialista, el socialismo libertario es posiblemente el menos comprendido. Para muchas personas en los Estados Unidos, el socialismo libertario suena como una contradicción en los términos. La influencia corrosiva de la Guerra Fría ha distorsionado nuestra comprensión del socialismo, mientras que el secuestro explícito del término libertario por las fuerzas de derecha lo ha despojado de sus raíces dentro del campo socialista / comunista. Fuera del caso excepcional de los EE. UU., se entiende ampliamente que libertario es sinónimo de anarquismo o socialismo antiestatal. En América Latina en particular, los socialistas libertarios han desempeñado un papel fundamental en las luchas populares en toda la región, desde los movimientos estudiantiles en masa hasta la reciente ola de luchas feministas. Para expandir y enriquecer el debate actual sobre el socialismo en los EE. UU., Hablamos con varios militantes de organizaciones políticas en la tradición del socialismo libertario en Brasil, Argentina y Chile para explorar la historia, teoría y práctica del socialismo libertario.

Debido a la longitud de las respuestas, publicaremos esta entrevista de mesa redonda a plazos (parte 1). Para la parte 2, hablamos con militantes de Acción Socialista Libertaria (ASL) de Argentina.

También quisimos agradecer a todxs lxs que contribuyeron a nuestra recaudación de fondos Construyendo puentes de solidaridad internacional que hizo posible esta serie de entrevistas.

-Introducción, traducción y entrevista por Enrique Guerrero-López

ENRIQUE: ¿Puede presentarse, decirnos el nombre de su organización y un breve resumen de sus orígenes y su trabajo principal?

ASL: Somos la ASL (Acción Socialista Libertaria). Tenemos núcleos militantes en La Plata (Buenos Aires), Gran Buenos Aires Sur, Gran Buenos Aires Oeste, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires y Córdoba.

Nuestra presentación pública formal fue hacia noviembre de 2015, aunque veníamos reuniéndonos, debatiendo y planificando militancias en común desde, al menos, 2012.

Podríamos decir que el núcleo original de ASL fue la confluencia de compañeres con militancias políticas y sociales previas. Algunes que provenían de la experiencia política de OSL (Organización Socialista Libertaria) durante los 90s y hasta 2009; otres anarquistas con militancia piquetera en el MTD 1° de Mayo y el Movimiento de Trabajadorxs Norberto Salto, que junto a otras movimientos conforman el FOL (Frente de Organizaciones en Lucha) en el 2006; un núcleo de compañeres con militancia en el Colectivo desde el Pié (Agrupación estudiantil, gremial y de coproducción de Ciencias Exactas); otres que se fueron sumando que habían militado en la Red Libertaria en Buenos Aires y también de espacios feministas. Con ese núcleo primario fuimos combinando y agrupando las diversas experiencias y trayectorias para construir acuerdos y políticas en común.

Pensamos que la construcción de una Organización Política Libertaria con arraigo y desarrollo de su militancia en la lucha de clases debe ser algo permanente y continuo; que es una paciente tarea de desarrollar orgánica, programa, estrategias y tácticas novedosas pero con un fuerte sentido de pertenencia a los núcleos centrales del anarquismo. En ese sentido, nos percibimos como una Organización en construcción aún y con diversos grados de inserción popular.

Desarrollamos, entonces, diversas militancias de base y populares: en el ámbito territorial, ambiental, del feminismo, sindical, estudiantil, de los derechos humanos. Además de desarrollar actividades de propaganda, difusión y formación.

¿Cuáles son las raíces (origenes) del socialismo libertario en América del Sur?

En América del Sur, el anarquismo se instaló como corriente en el movimiento obrero y popular temprana y sólidamente. Sobre todo en las grandes urbes con acceso al puerto, la gran llegada de inmigración europea traía en sus alforjas toda una experiencia de organización y lucha. Llegan protagonistas de las revueltas del 48, comuneros perseguidos de París, integrantes de las secciones de la I Internacional.

En Argentina es particularmente importante el arribo de militancia anarquista. Ya vemos hacia 1858 la constitución de las primeras cajas de socorro mútuo y para fines de 1870 se establecen los primeros sindicatos, periódicos y agrupaciones libertarias.

Encuentran una sociedad sumamente desigual, injusta y en conflicto. El “éxito”, entonces, no será tanto de la capacidad de lxs “que vienen”, sino de lo que aquí se encuentra.

La corriente socialista libertaria será, en Argentina, ampliamente mayoritaria, en la izquierda y en el seno del movimiento obrero hasta 1930, con organizaciones emblemáticas como la F.O.R.A. (Federación Obrera Regional Argentina). Hasta ese momento, la militancia anarquista y la obrera se confunden en las mismas organizaciones.

La represión y los cambios en la configuración económica, por un lado; y la falta de actualización política-teórica propia y la aparición de nuevos actores políticos (Partido Comunista, peronismo, etc.), por otro, llevan al socialismo libertario a una crisis de grandes proporciones.

En ese contexto irán surgiendo organizaciones específicamente políticas del anarquismo. La ALA (Alianza Libertaria Argentina) entre 1923 y 1932); la Alianza Obrera Spartacus (entre 1935 y 40); la FACA/FLA (Federación Anarco-Comunista Argentina) entre 1932 hasta los años 50s y luego, con el nombre de Federación Libertaria Argentina, sobreviviendo hasta la actualidad; la Resistencia Libertaria (1969 a 1978) son ejemplos que tomamos como antecedentes en nuestro país.

Se pensarán como organizaciones políticas con diferentes espacios de inserción social (obrero, estudiantil, campesino, barrial), asumiendo la pérdida de la hegemonía libertaria del pasado e intentando ajustar sus tácticas y su propaganda para volver a desarrollar una sólida corriente libertaria en el seno del campo popular.

¿Qué diferencia al socialismo libertario de otras ramas del socialismo?

Nos gusta definirnos como parte de la izquierda revolucionaria, como una corriente libertaria dentro de ella; con sus particularidades y semejanzas.

Nuestra hipótesis de desarrollo de la experiencia del socialismo libertario en el campo popular es poder construir una alternativa política de masas que cuestione las formas representativas delegativas, autoritarias, verticales y patriarcales.

En ese sentido, tomamos tres ejes centrales y transversales de nuestra corriente como elementos distintivos: el clasismo, el feminismo, la práctica libertaria.

Nuestra militancia de base intenta desarrollar elementos disruptivos y democráticos consecuentes; intenta priorizar conciencia antes que la disputa por la mera dirección formal de organizaciones populares.

Otro elemento importante es la noción pedagógica de la acción directa en el camino de construcción de un Poder Directo del Pueblo; potenciando la práctica política de nuestra clase.

Un tercer vector es desarrollar una política antipatriarcal integral que atraviese toda la experiencia de masas, más allá de tareas concretas que se da el propio movimiento de mujeres y disidencias (la lucha por el aborto legal, la autodefensa contra el feminicidio, etc).

Nos parece central como anarquistas, además, el cuestionamiento de la democracia burguesa como espacio de resolución o mejoras de las condiciones de vida de nuestra clase; intentando desarrollar experiencias de gestión directa, democrática y de abajo hacia arriba. En ese sentido, intentamos desarrollar un cuestionamiento al Estado como lugar de disputa y a la vía electoral como “único” espacio de acción específicamente política.

¿Qué papel juega la organización política dentro de los movimientos sociales y cómo encaja eso en su visión de la política socialista libertaria?

Existen diversas visiones en el campo de la izquierda con respecto a la intervención de las organizaciones políticas en los movimientos sociales.

Incluso dentro del anarquismo militante (dejando de lado a individualistas o a aquellxs que abordan aspectos más “contraculturales”), podríamos decir que existen por lo menos tres posiciones al respecto: lxs que ven al “grupo político libertario” como un espacio únicamente de propaganda o difusión y donde los acuerdos son laxos y casi no hay intervención en los movimientos sociales ; aquellxs que no ven la necesidad de desarrollar un espacio estrictamente político y combinan en la militancia de base aspectos políticos-sociales comunes; y, finalmente, una corriente como la nuestra que ve central la doble organización, la política y la social.

Nuestra visión de la Organización Política Libertaria intenta tomar enseñanzas de las experiencias históricas que señalamos anteriormente, incorporando además la experiencia de diversas organizaciones del llamado “especifismo latinoamericano”, como la FAU (Federación Anarquista Uruguaya) desde los años 60s o la OSL (Organización Socialista Libertaria) en Argentina en los 90s y 2000s. También la experiencia de los exiliados rusos de Dielo Truda (con Makhno y Archinoff como cabezas visibles) que propondrán una Unión General de los Anarquistas y una Plataforma Organizativa.

Considerando la relación con las organizaciones sociales, consideramos a nuestra organización política como una instancia de articulación de nuestra militancia popular; de formación de militantes integrales libertarixs y de debate estratégico de nuestras tareas específicamente, considerándonos como apenas un núcleo de una construcción mayor a desarrollar.

- Articulación de la militancia popular, como un espacio pedagógico y dinamizador de nuestra inserción popular; defendiendo la independencia política de las organizaciones de base, pero trabajando para potenciar todo lo que de clasista, feminista y libertario tenga en su seno. Fomentando la defensa de derechos y libertades populares y, a su vez, ir prefigurando en prácticas concretas y palpables la sociedad por la que luchamos. Definir tácticas y estrategias comunes de las diversas militancias y coordinar nuestra militancia en un sentido de desarrollar un Poder Directo del Pueblo como herramienta de ruptura con el actual orden capitalista, patriarcal y estatal.
- La formación de militantes integrales libertarixs la entendemos como algo dinámico y con diversas aristas: la práctica política con determinados valores y sentires; la formación teórica mediante los debates, la lectura y talleres; la diversidad de nuestras responsabilidades en la organización política y en la social; la polémica con otras corrientes; la elaboración de materiales de propaganda y difusión, etc.
- El debate estratégico de nuestras tareas no lo pensamos escindidas de la propias características niveles de desarrollo de las organizaciones sociales donde participamos ni donde construímos. Objetivos como la autoactividad de las masas, autogobierno de lxs trabajadorxs o independencia de clase no son aspectos formales o retóricos, debemos empalmarlos desde el hoy en las tareas de los movimientos sociales.

En ese sentido la Organización Política la vemos como un empuje, un aliento, un sostén del desarrollo autónomo del movimiento popular; con más responsabilidades y ningún privilegio; y actuando, en determinados momentos de repliegue, como retaguardia que salvaguarde los objetivos de transformación radical.

La Organización Política la pensamos como un espacio pedagógico y dinamizador de la militancia popular. Una de nuestras tareas es defender la independencia política de las organizaciones populares, pero militando para potenciar todo lo que de clasista, feminista y libertario tenga en su seno. Pensamos que la política debe surgir desde la base, de abajo hacia arriba;

En los EE. UU., Existe un amplio debate sobre la política electoral en la izquierda. ¿Cómo se relacionan los socialistas libertarios en América del Sur con la política electoral?

Históricamente, las organizaciones y corrientes políticas más importantes de la izquierda en Argentina han participado electoralmente. Desde el viejo Partido Socialista desde fines del Siglo IXX hasta el Partido Comunista desde los años 30 del siglo pasado. Tal vez, la excepción ha sido en los años 70 el PRT (Partido Revolucionario de los Trabajadores), una importante formación proveniente del trotskismo y guevarismo que desarrolló la lucha armada y no participó electoralmente en su momento de auge.

Desde el retorno de la democracia en 1983, las organizaciones de izquierda anticapitalista más importantes han sido las provenientes del trotskismo. Todas ellas, han desarrollado durante estos más de 30 años una sostenida política de intervención electoral. A veces como tribuna de debate, otras como propaganda y, desde la formación del FIT (Frente de Izquierda y de los Trabajadores, una alianza entre diversos grupos de izquierda), han tenido pequeños “éxitos electorales”, sumando alrededor de un 3 a 5 % del electorado nacional, ganando diputados nacionales y provinciales y referenciado a determinados “tribunos del pueblo”.

El anarquismo y sus organizaciones en Argentina nunca ha desarrollado sectores que hayan participado electoralmente en la democracia burguesa. Aunque en los últimos años se da una paradoja con respecto a nuestro marco de alianzas. Sectores con los que compartimos militancia social, acuerdos tácticos de intervención o, incluso, espacios de articulación política han, progresivamente, optado por comenzar a participar de diferentes instancias electorales. Algunas en el mencionado FIT y otras en construcciones de centroizquierda o aliadas de sectores del kirchnerismo. Incluso encontramos franjas con sostenidas simpatías hacia nuestra corriente o, incluso, provenientes del anarquismo.

Esto nos obligó a debatir con ellos, más desde lo táctico y político coyuntural, sin caer en posiciones cerradas y abstencionistas abstractas.

Podemos ver tres debates centrales en ese sentido. Por un lado, la cuestión electoral se ve como un “salto a la política” posible, un crecimiento y una respuesta para superar el “corporativismo” y el “tradeunionismo” desde las militancias sociales. Ante esto, nuestra postura es que es correcta la necesidad de ese “salto”, pero que circunscribir la intervención política a la intervención electoral desprecia la política, la mete en la arena del enemigo, con las tácticas del enemigo de clase y sus instrumentos. Seguimos sosteniendo que la democracia burguesa es la dictadura de la burguesía, un instrumento de consenso para la explotación capitalista y patriarcal. Nos interesa desarrollar campañas políticas de intervención local y nacional; propuestas populares, etc incluso con presentación de proyectos de ley, como fue el caso de la Ley de Interrupción Voluntario del Embarazo, donde amplios sectores desarrollaron desde abajo y democrática y nacionalmente una gran campaña de masas.

El otro aspecto es nuestro cuestionamiento de la democracia burguesa y la necesidad de articular una Alternativa Política Extraparlamentaria que sea una referencia para los movimientos sociales en lucha, el movimiento de mujeres y disidencias, las corrientes clasistas del movimiento obrero y estudiantil, etc. Una articulación política y con una agenda de intervención entre diferentes corrientes de la izquierda revolucionaria, libertaria y autónoma. Mal podremos desarrollar una crítica radical y política a los instrumentos de consenso de la burguesía si aceptamos lisa y llanamente su juego.

Finalmente, nuestra crítica táctica a la intervención electoral la analizamos a la luz de los recursos políticos, militantes y económicos que se destinan a las campañas electorales por organizaciones hermanas; lo que va a redundar, más temprano que tarde, en un descuido o en una apreciación instrumentista de la militancia de base y de las organizaciones sociales es post de una “corrección política” y de un conservadurismo en métodos audaces o disruptivos de intervención política, sobre todo aquellos que desarrollan la acción directa como método de intervención.

Recientemente, ha habido una ola de luchas feministas en América del Sur, particularmente en Argentina y Chile, incluyendo toma de escuelas y manifestaciones masivas sobre derechos reproductivos. ¿Cómo han participado lxs socialistas libertarios en estas luchas y cómo el feminismo difunde su teoría y su práctica a nivel general?

Es interesante rastrear los antecedentes históricos del movimiento feminista en la región para analizar la fundamental influencia libertaria. Desde la experiencia del periódico “La voz de la Mujer”, impulsado por la anarcofeminista Virginia Bolten; pasando por la formación de Mujeres Libres en los años 80s en Buenos Aires o las primeras “Comisiones de Mujeres” con una fuerte intervención de nuestras compañeras anarquistas en los movimientos piqueteros a finales de los 90s hasta la actualidad.

En toda esta etapa hemos participado activamente, aún con nuestras modestas fuerzas. Lo hemos hecho, en el dïa a día y, por supuesto, en las calles, en esas multitudinarias e históricas jornadas de lucha. Tanto en las movilizaciones del Ni Una Menos, como en los paros de mujeres, los 8 de Marzo, los 25 de noviembre o en las jornadas de acampe y acción directa en el Congreso Nacional por la sanción de la ley de interrupción voluntaria del embarazo.

Pero, también, interviniendo diariamente en varias organizaciones específicas: en consejerías populares pre y post aborto, en la Campaña Nacional Contra las Violencias hacia las Mujeres, en la Campaña por el Derecho al Aborto Legal, Seguro y Gratuito; en los Encuentros Nacionales de Mujeres, ahora renombrado Encuentro Plurinacional de Mujeres, Lesbianas,Travestis y Trans; en organizaciones feministas específicas y en las diversas comisiones y áreas de las organizaciones populares donde militamos.

Desde el punto de intervención política particular estamos impulsando una Asamblea Feminista Libertaria junto a compañeras de otras organizaciones libertarias y militantes anarquistas sindicales, sociales, feministas, intelectuales y estudiantiles. La idea es pensar nuestra práctica, acordar políticas transversales de intervención y elaborar línea para accionar desde nuestra mirada en la actual coyuntura.

En ese sentido, desde ASL, hemos editado un documento para aportar a una Definición Estratégica del Feminismo Libertario. En él, caracterizamos al movimiento de mujeres y disidencias como, claramente, el sector más dinámico políticamente de la clase trabajadora en estos días ya que cuestiona no solo las opresiones patriarcales y capitalistas dentro de las relaciones personales y cotidianas, sino también de las instituciones del Estado e incluso dentro de las organizaciones sociales.

En América del Sur, muchos socialistas libertarixs han propuesto una teoría y una práctica para construir el “poder popular”. ¿Qué es el poder popular y qué formas ha adoptado en la práctica?

Al igual que la mayoría de la militancia de izquierda con inserción social en Latinoamérica, desde el socialismo libertario se aborda la construcción de Poder Popular.

Hemos intentado polemizar con el término desde un cuadernillo que intenta sistematizar nuestras posiciones al respecto ya que, dentro de ese concepto tan amplio, se pueden ver rastros de las más variadas corrientes y políticas. Algunas de ellas enriquecen y otras, a nuestro humilde entender, confunden.

Para la A.S.L., la construcción de Poder Popular es una estrategia compleja, permanente y de disputa.

Ante la multiplicidad de acepciones que se le da, desde un tiempo a esta parte, comenzamos a definir dicha estrategia como Poder Directo del Pueblo; ya que nos parece que se acerca mucho más a una visión libertaria de la construcción.

Decimos que la construcción de Poder Directo del Pueblo (PDP) es compleja porque intenta encontrar herramientas y gérmenes de prácticas liberadoras en las condiciones objetivas en la cual desarrollamos nuestra militancia; permanente, porque no pensamos un desarrollo en etapas estancas pero tampoco que todo momento político sea el mismo para el desarrollo del PDP; y de disputa, porque intenta pelear contras los sentidos verticales, patriarcales y liberales en la construcción política y de masas.

Pensamos que el desarrollo del PDP debe ir de la mano de la experiencia, de la lectura de la etapa y de las propias fuerzas que – como clase – tengamos. Discrepando tanto con la “huída del poder” como con la “toma del poder”; consideramos que la estrategia de PDP va construyendo un poder desde los sectores oprimidos y desde el pueblo trabajador desde donde prefigurar materialmente ese socialismo libertario, desde abajo, sin Estado ni Patriarcado que queremos construir.

En la actual coyuntura que atraviesa la región, estamos atravesando una etapa de PDP que se apoya más en la Resistencia y Organización que en avances significativos.

La necesidad de defender conquistas históricas de nuestra clase y del movimiento de mujeres y disidencias sexuales se torna central en esta etapa. Por ello la promoción de organizarnos unitariamente desde abajo, en las organizaciones gremiales y político-gremiales que las masas reconocen como legítimas para su defensa: sindicatos, organizaciones sociales y reivindicativas, centro de estudiantes, asociaciones barriales, agrupaciones y consejerías feministas.

Por otro, lado, nos parece central el debate acerca del cuestionamiento de la democracia burguesa como el espacio político “natural” de nuestras intervenciones; intentando desarrollar y promover instancias locales de democracia y acción directa: campañas, coordinadoras multisectoriales, romper con el coorporativismo, etc.

Dentro de esto, vemos fundamental la experimentación de la gestión de recursos arrancados en la lucha en el ámbito territorial, la posibilidad de contención antiburocrática en determinados Cuerpos de Delegadxs o Juntas Internas gremiales para defender conquistas, la solidaridad de clase. Creer en la práctica en nuestras fuerzas, demostrando que ninguna crisis podrán resolverla los que la generaron: el Estado y los patrones.

Si te gustó este artículo te recomendamos ejemplares de temática similar, “¡El socialismo será libre o no será!” y “Poder popular en tiempos de reacción: Estrategia para la lucha social.