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Revolting London: anarchists against the Mayoral elections - 6pm 2 May 2008 - City Hall (london)

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raw
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Apr 30 2008 09:19
Revolting London: anarchists against the Mayoral elections - 6pm 2 May 2008 - City Hall (london)

We all know politicians are lying, corrupt, self-serving parasites - its time we let them know. This is our London, not their, their party's or their paymasters'. On Friday May 2nd we will confront our class enemies at the Mayoral election results, reviving a great radical London tradition. Its time to take to the streets and claim back our city.

MEET 6pm at City Hall, The Queen's Walk, Tower Bridge, London. Bring noise and anger.

This is the text of a leaflet being distributed now.(over 20,000 leaflets distributed!)

We all know politicians are lying, corrupt, self-serving parasites - its time we let them know.

This is our London, not their, their party's or their paymasters'.

On Friday May 2nd we will confront our class enemies at the Mayoral election results, reviving a great radical London tradition.

Its time to take to the streets and claim back our city.

6pm
City Hall
The Queen's Walk, Tower Bridge
South side of the river

++ London Revolting ++

We're told London is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, playground to the super rich, a global financial centre where city workers, paid in excess of £19bn, keep the institutions of power going.

But London has some of the poorest, most deprived areas in the country (50% of children here are living on or below the poverty line), as we are left to fight amongst ourselves for the most basic jobs and necessities.

As ordinary Londoners we are being priced out of our own city - either exiled to the outer reaches or pushed together in cramped expensive living conditions. Local councils sell off our housing to get-rich-quick developers, breaking up communities and further alienating us from each other as we struggle with increasing debt, fear and security.

++ Power mad ++

The office of Mayor (with its annual budget of over £9 billion) is a massive government institution designed to keep us from making real choices and decisions about our own city. Despite endless public announcements about helping Londoners THE CROOK still puts his full financial backing behind the 2012 Olympics, against local objections, where public money will go to staging a 2 weeks sports show, while private companies reap the rewards; owning the Olympic land, property and sites in the east end that once belonged to us!

All over London THE CROOK is promoting property speculation an private development (selling off public facilities, and open spaces for luxury housing) at the expense of our needs while siphoning off taxpayers' money for his own pet projects and personal cronies. But would THE TOFF, THE COP or THE FASCIST act any differently? Aren't all politicians the same - out to line their own pockets, lying to protect their own interests and influential friends?

When it comes down to it, don't all political parties really represent the interests of the rich and not those of ordinary people?

And isn't it about time we did something about it?

++ BNP / Anti-Fascism ++

Our so-called political leaders, along with the media, continually deflect our anger from the main enemy onto other working class people - immigrants and unemployed. They use people's genuine concerns to create false divisions and promote their own agendas. Is it any surprise that the BNP leadership, like Cameron and Brown, come from the same privileged backgrounds?

Our class heritage has always been one of defiance and dissent - a refusal to bow down to authority and oppression, be it the fascists during WW2, Thatcher during the Miner's Strike or Murdoch at Wapping - this is our real history, solidarity and self-organisation, and despite the language they use the BNP have always had a vicious anti-working class tradition.

Which is why we should be out in force to stop them taking the platform at City Hall.

++ Get rid of 'em all ++

The history of London and Londoners is a culture of rebellion and discontent - organising ourselves against the domination of the privileged few - from the Peasant's Revolt to the Battle of Cable Street and the Poll Tax riot.

On May 2nd we will be adding to that tradition - an active resistance against the power the office of Mayor represents and the political parties that reinforce it. We want our city back from THE CROOKS, THE TOFFS, THE FASCISTS and THE COPS.

Its time London joined together making our anger count by getting rid of the lot of them.

++ MAYORAL COSTS - HOW WE PAY FOR THE PRIVILEGE: ++
- £100 million a year spent on publicity alone
- £33 million a year to staff City Hall
- £120 million a year on the 'Core GLA Budget' (ie, the Mayor's personal projects)
- £300 a year the average London household pays for the office of Mayor.

___________

Its time to take to the streets and claim back our city.

6pm
City Hall
The Queen's Walk, Tower Bridge
South side of the river

wat tyler

David UK
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Apr 30 2008 10:30

Can I ask a serious question, (no offence intended, im trying to be constructive)

What will the organisers consider to be a sucessful outcome for this demonstration?

We're not going to "take back the streets" or even build toward such an event because this doesn't adress the needs of working people in a practical way, it's a stunt. It'll get piged to fuck... I dunno.

Someone described a sucess as "not being arrested and goign to the pub afterwards" but the thing is, I can go to the pub and not get arested without going to this demo,and More importantly I can also tell people that votings a load of bollocks in my local, but most people already know... It's just that they don't see an alternative, because we're not building one. We're doing stunts.

raw
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Apr 30 2008 12:00
David UK wrote:
Can I ask a serious question, (no offence intended, im trying to be constructive)

What will the organisers consider to be a sucessful outcome for this demonstration?

We're not going to "take back the streets" or even build toward such an event because this doesn't adress the needs of working people in a practical way, it's a stunt. It'll get piged to fuck... I dunno.

Someone described a sucess as "not being arrested and goign to the pub afterwards" but the thing is, I can go to the pub and not get arested without going to this demo,and More importantly I can also tell people that votings a load of bollocks in my local, but most people already know... It's just that they don't see an alternative, because we're not building one. We're doing stunts.

Hi David,

Its making our presence felt in London on May 2nd. Its mobilising people who may support the politics of what the leaflet sets out and therefore making them aware that there are others in London that feel the same way. It will bring many different groups of people together, form experiences and communicate with one and other.

If you want to go to the pub on May 2nd fair enough - we prefer to be on the streets, visible, hopefully in many numbers.

Not everything we do has to directly "address the needs of working people in a practical way". We can decide to act when we want to on things which move us to act - the May 2nd election for example. You call it a "stunt", no its attempting to push forward our ideas in the process of mobilising people.

Many of the people involved in are also involved in other local groups which are trying to "address the needs of working people in a practical way", May 2nd is one day and makes our movement a little more interesting and vibrant than if we were just to sit back.

Ales

David UK
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Apr 30 2008 12:29
Quote:
Its making our presence felt in London on May 2nd

...To polititians and lefty-liberals?.

Now, I'm not sure who exactly paid for the stickers/posters, class war wan't it? As they've printed what must be thousands of stickers/posters, I've helped advertise the event. I've put up stickers, handed out those flyers etc, because, I'd rather the prop was handed out than wasted. And I will actually support comrades even if i have criticisms.

But I think the money poured into getting people to stand in a place and say "votings pointless" after the voting happened. Could have been spent more efficiently.

I still don't understand what a sucess will look like? What victory will be achieved that warrents all the effort put in? Is it an efficient use of the movements limited resources?

I recognise that loads of the people who organsied this are involved in local things, they're all cool guys. But, for example, after handing out a load of these election flyers I walked past a stand, it was about defending the Jones Family from eviction in Hackney. I recon you guys should print 10,000 stickers about that sort of thing instead if you see what I mean. As ur all involved in local stuff you know whats goign on better than I do

But good luck anyway ...I want pix!

raw
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Apr 30 2008 13:04
David UK wrote:
Quote:
Its making our presence felt in London on May 2nd

...To polititians and lefty-liberals?.

Now, I'm not sure who exactly paid for the stickers/posters, class war wan't it? As they've printed what must be thousands of stickers/posters, I've helped advertise the event. I've put up stickers, handed out those flyers etc, because, I'd rather the prop was handed out than wasted. And I will actually support comrades even if i have criticisms.

But I think the money poured into getting people to stand in a place and say "votings pointless" after the voting happened. Could have been spent more efficiently.

I still don't understand what a sucess will look like? What victory will be achieved that warrents all the effort put in? Is it an efficient use of the movements limited resources?

I recognise that loads of the people who organsied this are involved in local things, they're all cool guys. But, for example, after handing out a load of these election flyers I walked past a stand, it was about defending the Jones Family from eviction in Hackney. I recon you guys should print 10,000 stickers about that sort of thing instead if you see what I mean. As ur all involved in local stuff you know whats goign on better than I do

But good luck anyway ...I want pix!

Thanks for the comments. Whenever I get into this either/or situation i tend to become disinterested in the argument. Why? because nothing is being denied to anyone or the "movement" by doing May 2nd. There wasn't a meeting that said "We have x amount of money should we do an anti-election thing or a local campaign". People discussed about showing an opposition to the elections and this is what people came up with. There is nothing wrong with us doing these things, like I said before it brings people together and hopefully brings numbers onto the streets.

Whilst the May 2nd group was busy printing stickers and leaflets, HSG were organising haringey indepence day - distributing 30,000 leaflets. Us in Camden were also meeting, organising and getting involved in housing issues. LCAP were organising a demonstration with residents at Hostel in hackney.....etc.

ales

David UK
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Apr 30 2008 15:02

No that's cool, I'm not condemning everything I am simply being critical, hopefully constructively.

Quote:
There is nothing wrong with us doing these things

I'm not saying it's wrong, im just questioning if it's the best use of resources. Obviously you lot can spend your money how you want. And now that you have spent it, I am helping to distro the stuff. But I am allowed to be comradely' critical of whether it's the most efficient use of resources.

We have a goal of convincing the majority of 60 million people in the UK to support class-struggle anarchism, within a decade. Does the anti-ellection demonstration help? Maybe. But like you i'm involved in other campaigns and initiatives and I see more potential there.

But then, Im going on the TUC march tomorrow so I have to include myself in most of these criticisms!

Regardless of that, as effort has gone into it, I hope you have a big turnout.

Caiman del Barrio
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May 2 2008 16:25
David UK wrote:
We have a goal of convincing the majority of 60 million people in the UK to support class-struggle anarchism, within a decade.

Good luck with that. wink

Caiman del Barrio
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May 2 2008 16:27
raw wrote:
Its making our presence felt in London on May 2nd. Its mobilising people who may support the politics of what the leaflet sets out and therefore making them aware that there are others in London that feel the same way. It will bring many different groups of people together, form experiences and communicate with one and other.

So at best it's to meet new people, network etc and at worst it's a little social scene clique of going to demos and then feeling happy? Well there's some potential in the former I guess (although I'd still have to question the tactics), but isn't this essentially copying the SWP?

JohnnyGuitar
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May 3 2008 17:52

It seems to me that David UK's criticism is valid: instead of perpetuating the movement, one ought instead to transcend it. Resistance to capitalism should never be an end in itself, but only a stepping stone to something higher. One can become too tied up in the culture surrounding the resistance, forgetting that the movement springs up in reaction to an undesirable situation. By organising rallies etc. to 'mobilise' numbers, as raw puts it, you are simply deferring the course of action - whatever that may be - in somewhat the same way as Kafka describes in his short story, 'The City Coat of Arms'. Rather than simply building the tower, you seem to be more concerned with what emblem should be on your Coat of Arms.

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Tacks
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May 4 2008 09:40

yeah man, totally.

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Tacks
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May 4 2008 10:12
Quote:
Regardless of that, as effort has gone into it, I hope you have a big turnout.

Cops put it at 70 on their radio, sympathetic photographer i know put it at 70, indymedia report puts it at 100. I think 100 people probably turned up over the course of the event but were prevented from being in the same place by the police, who were completely on top of things.

David UK wrote:
I'm not saying it's wrong, im just questioning if it's the best use of resources. Obviously you lot can spend your money how you want. And now that you have spent it, I am helping to distro the stuff. But I am allowed to be comradely' critical of whether it's the most efficient use of resources. We have a goal of convincing the majority of 60 million people in the UK to support class-struggle anarchism, within a decade. Does the anti-ellection demonstration help?

I can answer this: no, it can't have done really. I don't think it even raised the profile of anarchism or anti-electoral sentiment from the way it panned out. And to be honest, the real surprise would have been if 500+ people had turned up, not the fact they didn't. As to use of resources, several weekends of leafletting, over a grand spent on the leaflets (which looked good and read well) and stickers, a benefit gig... In my view a massive overinvestment considering the end result. I'll make my criticisms evenly and with constructive intentions next time i meet ppl face to face.

Quote:
But then, Im going on the TUC march tomorrow so I have to include myself in most of these criticisms!

Well i have argued for (and put into place) anarchists being on the TUC march before, but i don't even need to do that here: david you were marching with ur union, and they were on the TUC march. Its not the same as spending weeks of effort and bundles of dosh, you just marched with some comrades and went for a drink, which is all we set out to do smile And 3 people found us and joined the union after the march too, making it well worth our time.

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May 4 2008 11:34

any pics? reports?

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May 4 2008 20:19

http://johnnyvoid.wordpress.com/

I also posted this on urban75

"I arrived late, there was 70 odd people* there and police lines were already moving people. After mingling for a short period police formations basically forced people into a pen (which was predicatble and I cant understand the oversight tbh) which when sealed held about 40 odd people, a few people managed to get out.
After the usual banter, and exchanges with the police they informed us we were being held under the breach of peace act indefinitely, while the BNP roamed around unmolested - and that if we wished to do so we could leave in ones and twos (although this initially included searches and photographing from what I gather). Within four hours most had left the pen but some tried to insist on being allowed to leave collectively, but this didnt happen again under the terms layed down by the police that we were a threat to the peace.

The embankment turned out to be a bit of entertainment for a few onlookers (Im not sure how sympathetic some of them were tbh) we even had the fellow from newsnight down some werent and we got the usualy atagonistic cunts asking dumb questions, but some 'support' later turned out to be anarchos who were shouting

In terms of assessing the event I think it was a mess, and Im not inclinned to think more preparation, more resources etc would make the event any better. Im not slagging people off btw, I supported the event and dished out a share of the leaflets. I actually think showing opposition to Boris, the BNP et al is important, its just a shame it was just anarchos and their millieu. We have to discuss this openly and seriously address our lack of influence in London and wider.

* although my understanding is a few people had already begun to dissipate by this point"

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May 4 2008 20:39

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May 4 2008 21:33

While in general I agree with the criticisms of demos like this that've been put forward in this thread, if you're gonna do them, why not have decent banners? The bottom one in that photo is fucking ugly, and the antifa one looks really weird with the colour change in fascist (I think I get what you tried to do, but it ends up looking silly). Pity, coz the antifa banner was almost real pretty.

The demo also seems to have had mixed goals to me that may have been mutually exclusive - the antifa aspect of stopping the BNP mob getting there, and the "stand outside and yell a bit at everyone" demo. The antifa aspect surely would've been better off had the latter not been planned, and may have had a better chance at succeeding...

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May 5 2008 07:41

....march together, strike seperately

The demo was to offer dissent to the electoral farce (see the propaganda at the top of the page), arguing it would have been better without fridays demo is frankly all to typical of the mind set that passes on here. I cant stress enough how important it is that we get involved in public displays of anger against the status quo, if its not us then a monopoly can easily develop between the far-right and the far-left, but let us be clear friday was by no means a success. We remained for the most part a radical fringe without any significant public support, and to boot the amount of resources put into the event was a little dissapointing considering the end result.

We should discuss what as passed without the usually derision from the armchair types and seek to do things better in a future capacity as the London Anarchists or whomever.

@Asher, antifa was later involved in a confrontation see here

Newstatesman article

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May 5 2008 08:30

october - Yeah, I saw that. Surely if it hadn't been for the "public" demo something along those lines could've been much more effective? It certainly seems more worthwhile to me than what did occur.

Anyway, I'm on the other side of the world, but I figured I'd throw in my two cents, we have similar shit over here (just with lower numbers).

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May 5 2008 08:33

I agree we could have had antifa type action or a less vocal picket with decent propaganda (why were picketing etc) and I wouldnt have had a problem with that. I dont think it would have ended with the same heavy handedness by the police TBH so its a valid point IMHO

David UK
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May 5 2008 11:11

This makes me depressed

David UK
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May 5 2008 11:11
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May 5 2008 12:14
october_lost wrote:

Newstatesman article

I'm not too familar with the New Statesman. But that article was completely objective, even to the point of being sympathetic with the anarchists/anti-fascists. Very well written too.

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May 5 2008 18:47
october_lost wrote:
We should discuss what as passed without the usually derision from the armchair types and seek to do things better in a future capacity as the London Anarchists or whomever.

Yes you activists should definitely ignore us armchair types. This armchair type was at work that day, doing his work and trying to drum up support from his co-workers to possibly ballot for industrial action for re-instatement of a dismissed colleague, and getting people to vote to reject our sub-inflationary pay deal in large enough numbers that our union will be less likely to call off strike action this year.

Why do you think only 70 of the anarcho usual suspects turned up, and that probably not one single non-activist member of the public who got one of those £1,000 of leaflets did?

Because it's scene posturing which has absolutely no connection with the everyday lives of working people.

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May 5 2008 22:42

Steven. inherent in your comment is that I and others dont get involved in the things you list, what exactly are you basing that on? But hey dont let facts stand in the way of your diatribe....

winjer
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May 5 2008 23:55
Inigo Montoya wrote:
I'm not too familar with the New Statesman. But that article was completely objective, even to the point of being sympathetic with the anarchists/anti-fascists. Very well written too.

Written by a Canadian who went to Harvard and was active in the new SDS.

Many here would doubtless all too readily dismiss her as a wadical activistoid...

raw
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May 6 2008 08:03

There was definitely a problem on mobilisation that needs to be addressed - as expected - the ability for anarchists in London to have capabilities to mobilise more than our own number for specifically decided upon initiatives like May 2nd is paramount to developing a cohesive movement with some presence. These debates are not welcomed on these boards, so we might as well save it for face to face discussion as we have been doing with the london-wide meetings.

What steven does is what many, many people do everyday (from leftists, to trade unionisits and generally sound class conscious workers) - what we are saying steven is we want an anarchist movement that can gain influence with ideas, actions and methods, we not opposed to this, in fact we see it necessary to build such a movement and hopefully we will achieve this aim sooner rather than latter.

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May 6 2008 10:03

Hey Raw, its nice to have you back on the boards getting in constructive discussion. Its also nice to see that you guys have taken on board a lot of the criticisms that have been laid to you by people on this forum over the years and, speaking totally in a personal capacity, even though I've had quite a lot of criticisms about stuff that you've organised recently, I have been impressed by your re-orientation towards class struggle politics that seems to have occurred through the discussions, even if you've not managed to orient yourself towards the working class itself as yet.

I guess my main concern with this stuff (and a lot of the stuff you've publicised on here) is that the only 'anarchism' it builds is one removed from daily life and an 'anarchism' that is removed from daily life cannot "gain influence with ideas, actions and methods" because it will have no relevance to the bread and butter of working class people. This isn't to say no working class people came along to your action, just that those who did are doing so out of a feeling of affinity to a particular scene rather than as part of a living movement to improve their lives. Scenes grow and go away but by their nature cannot be mass because they involve a lifestyle choice which most people will not be interested in making (same way I like hip hop and high-top trainers but an anarchism based around that will always remain small, if well dressed wink ).

So when you say that that its of paramount importance for anarchists to be able to mobilise more than our own number for these sorts of things, what we're saying is that you won't as long as this is where the bulk of your organising goes because these events will only interest those who are already interested. I agree with Steven that this event was scene posturing: what significant threat does the London anarchist movement pose to the running of the London Assembly? Even the BNP? Our milieu has trouble getting a cohesive block for Mayday, let alone a pay rise, let alone scaring the shit out of the people who run one of the world's most powerful cities.

Just to throw in my personal opinion, I think a major problem is that you focus a lot of your attention on what 'The Anarchist Movement' looks like, is doing etc. The point is that its not the anarchist movement that does this or that, its the working class. Therefore the task is not to build a strong anarchist movement as such, but to build a strong working class (and there will be cross-over but to conflate the two is very dangerous imo, and mirrors the Leninist view of the Party). That's what Steven was doing, and as you rightly point out, a lot of leftists too. But for me, a half dozen militant workers organising wildcat action is more important than 100 anarchists shouting abuse at bumbling politicians from behind a police cordon.

Also, october_lost, I think Steven was just reacting to your comment about derision from 'armchair types', as if the only people who would criticise this action (and not just the action itself, as you have, but the whole theoretical framework of which this action was a part) are people who sit in armchairs all day reading Kropotkin. Steven is a shop steward where he works and even if he may have over-reacted, I think its equally unfair to claim that all the critics of this sort of activity do so from their armchairs.

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May 6 2008 11:40
october_lost wrote:
Steven. inherent in your comment is that I and others dont get involved in the things you list, what exactly are you basing that on? But hey dont let facts stand in the way of your diatribe....

And what is inherent in this comment:

october_lost wrote:
We should discuss what as passed without the usually derision from the armchair types and seek to do things better in a future capacity as the London Anarchists or whomever.

I would read it to imply that anyone who criticise things like this demonstration isn't involved in anything.

Devrim

raw
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May 6 2008 12:29
Ed wrote:
Hey Raw, its nice to have you back on the boards getting in constructive discussion. Its also nice to see that you guys have taken on board a lot of the criticisms that have been laid to you by people on this forum over the years and, speaking totally in a personal capacity, even though I've had quite a lot of criticisms about stuff that you've organised recently, I have been impressed by your re-orientation towards class struggle politics that seems to have occurred through the discussions, even if you've not managed to orient yourself towards the working class itself as yet.

I guess my main concern with this stuff (and a lot of the stuff you've publicised on here) is that the only 'anarchism' it builds is one removed from daily life and an 'anarchism' that is removed from daily life cannot "gain influence with ideas, actions and methods" because it will have no relevance to the bread and butter of working class people. This isn't to say no working class people came along to your action, just that those who did are doing so out of a feeling of affinity to a particular scene rather than as part of a living movement to improve their lives. Scenes grow and go away but by their nature cannot be mass because they involve a lifestyle choice which most people will not be interested in making (same way I like hip hop and high-top trainers but an anarchism based around that will always remain small, if well dressed wink ).

So when you say that that its of paramount importance for anarchists to be able to mobilise more than our own number for these sorts of things, what we're saying is that you won't as long as this is where the bulk of your organising goes because these events will only interest those who are already interested. I agree with Steven that this event was scene posturing: what significant threat does the London anarchist movement pose to the running of the London Assembly? Even the BNP? Our milieu has trouble getting a cohesive block for Mayday, let alone a pay rise, let alone scaring the shit out of the people who run one of the world's most powerful cities.

Just to throw in my personal opinion, I think a major problem is that you focus a lot of your attention on what 'The Anarchist Movement' looks like, is doing etc. The point is that its not the anarchist movement that does this or that, its the working class. Therefore the task is not to build a strong anarchist movement as such, but to build a strong working class (and there will be cross-over but to conflate the two is very dangerous imo, and mirrors the Leninist view of the Party). That's what Steven was doing, and as you rightly point out, a lot of leftists too. But for me, a half dozen militant workers organising wildcat action is more important than 100 anarchists shouting abuse at bumbling politicians from behind a police cordon.

Also, october_lost, I think Steven was just reacting to your comment about derision from 'armchair types', as if the only people who would criticise this action (and not just the action itself, as you have, but the whole theoretical framework of which this action was a part) are people who sit in armchairs all day reading Kropotkin. Steven is a shop steward where he works and even if he may have over-reacted, I think its equally unfair to claim that all the critics of this sort of activity do so from their armchairs.

Hi Ed, thanks for your comments - though rumour of my return to these boards is greatly exargerrated.

Libcom has had little effect on my politics as I can think for myself in a lot of matters - from experiences ..etc. I have always been orientated toward working class politics from a young age, whilst involved in Wombles, social centres,....etc. The difference I see Ed is that I see the importance of practically developing things. Hence the mutlitude of intitiatives I've been involved in. Real political actions takes place in, well, reality and even though you speak about the May 2nd thing being seperated from people everyday lives - it was very much discussed with people in their everyday lives. I don't think that people are only interested in what improves their lives directly, people are interested in alot of different things and are passionate about alot more than bread and butter issues. Is buiding a strongly identified movement which share similar political outlook wrong?

To most people Ed the workplace is just as sad and depressing (in terms of work and class struggle) than what passes as the anarchist movement . Its fair enough if you or others on here are "one voice in the crowd" at your work or in school but if we are ever to organise more effectively we need to gather together people who want to be more effective -especially when things aren't going right.

The workplace is also not neccesarily reflected of other struggles - alot of people are fairly economically stable (they may be poor but stable) - but there are other issues where we need to be present in beyond that.

What you have been proposing or just saying is not enough - you may feel that our lack of success proves your point but it doesn't - we are all very aware of our faults and we are all very aware of what we need to do. What I'll ask you Ed is what do you suggest - now that the BNP are gaining massive support, that we have a tory mayor and that still we are at the mercy of a capitalism - are shall we just leave it to the working class to decide?

cheers

ales

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May 6 2008 12:51
guydebordisdead wrote:
Whatever about the idea behind the demo, mobilising close to 100 anarchists seems pretty dismal. Where has everyone gone?

Most anarchists weren't interested in the demo, because rightly or wrongly they thought it was a pointless idea, the low turnout is not a sign of declining numbers but declining interest in this sort of stunt.

David UK
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Joined: 5-09-04
May 6 2008 15:06
guydebordisdead wrote:
Whatever about the idea behind the demo, mobilising close to 100 anarchists seems pretty dismal. Where has everyone gone?

Sensible land?

David UK
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Joined: 5-09-04
May 6 2008 15:08
guydebordisdead wrote:
Where are they though? There werent that many on the Mayday march from what I saw. Are they off somewhere else cooking something up? Genuine quesion.

Around. NONE of the Anarchists I know well, whereon that demo, save one or two. Thay are all very active however. In local grounds and other things.

Also, remember, mayday was a weekday and most of us didn't get the wobs callout for a bloc until very late. And most people have social lives on firday night. These things are relevent ...