Reading list for newbies

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gmtx725
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Jul 13 2013 14:12
Reading list for newbies

Hi everyone, I'm a long time lurker on this site and have a keen interest in libertarian socialism and anarchism. I thought I'd finally get round to posting on here smile

I have a problem though. As someone from a physical sciences background, I have absolutely no experience in the humanities whatsoever. I find a lot of theoretical discussion and discourse on this site very opaque and difficult to penetrate, and in fact, this is one of the reasons I have held back from posting for so long. I'm sure I'm not the only person reading this site who feels intimidated by the level of technical discussion despite an interest in the subject matter.

With that in mind, I was wondering if people could point me in the direction of some key texts that will enable me to contribute to this site. I've already read things like the Anarchist FAQ, and Berkman's the ABC of Anarchism, but I'm after something a bit more theoretical that will help me develop my critical faculties, although hopefully that will still be readable at my level. Your help is greatly appreciated!

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Joseph Kay
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Jul 13 2013 18:46

Have you seen the libcom introductory guides? http://libcom.org/library/libcom-introductory-guide - They might be too basic, depending on what you're looking for.

A lot of the jargon is probably Marxist (anarchism hasn't developed as specific a conceptual vocabulary imho, which some consider a strength and others a weakness). Michael Heinrich's recent introduction to the three volumes of Marx's Capital is really accessible: http://monthlyreview.org/press/books/pb2884/

I saw this guide to queer theory linked earlier: http://critical-theory.com/what-the-fuck-is-queer-theory/ - I haven't checked if that site has other similar introductions yet.

I'm sure there must be some good general intros to humanities, and recurring themes like structure/agency, nature/nurture, but I'm not aware of them as it's something i've kinda picked up piecemeal. Anyone know any good intros to social science?

I'd also say, feel free to post n00b questions on the forums. I know it can be intimidating, but being nice to newbies is one of the posting guidelines, and admins will step in if anyone acts like a dick.

Mark.
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Jul 13 2013 19:08
gmtx725 wrote:
I have a problem though. As someone from a physical sciences background, I have absolutely no experience in the humanities whatsoever. I find a lot of theoretical discussion and discourse on this site very opaque and difficult to penetrate

I've been around three decades or so and my reaction to a lot of the theoretical stuff is the same, not that I try very hard with it. I wouldn't worry about it - you're probably not missing that much. Anyway, welcome to the site.

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Agent of the In...
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Jul 13 2013 19:58

Read a bit of Marx, Bakunin, some Kropotkin, and old and new key syndicalist texts and you'll be good to go.

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Jul 13 2013 21:59

Yeah, what sort of stuff have you got in mind? As Joseph Kay says, there's the (still being expanded) introductory texts but we've also got our (also expanding) reading guides: http://libcom.org/library/libcomorg-reading-guide

Hope that's some help..

gmtx725
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Jul 14 2013 16:36
Quote:
YA lot of the jargon is probably Marxist (anarchism hasn't developed as specific a conceptual vocabulary imho, which some consider a strength and others a weakness). Michael Heinrich's recent introduction to the three volumes of Marx's Capital is really accessible: http://monthlyreview.org/press/books/pb2884/]

Cheers, I'll have a look into that, I tried to start reading Capital Vol I. with David Harvey's book but I gave up about a quarter of the way through as I wasn't really keeping pace. This sounds like a better introduction however so I'll give it a go.

Quote:
Anyone know any good intros to social science

Quote:
Yeah, what sort of stuff have you got in mind?

Some general accessible writings on social science, critical theory, social theory etc would be good. All of this is very different from what I'm used to, especially the methods of inquiry, so I'm basically starting from scratch here.

Quote:
I've been around three decades or so and my reaction to a lot of the theoretical stuff is the same, not that I try very hard with it. I wouldn't worry about it - you're probably not missing that much.

I always used to think that, but I would like to at least make the effort to understand these things; even if I don't agree with aspects of them, at least I will be able to understand the arguments being made.

Davi
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Jul 14 2013 20:37

I'm not sure if it'll be useful to you, but reading this following set of texts by the Internationalist Perspective magazine helped me getting acquainted with a lot of what people tend to discuss in here, even though I'm not so sure if it's the most accurate view on things:

http://internationalist-perspective.org/IP/ip-archive/ip_30-31_cap-crisi...

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Jul 14 2013 22:37
gmtx725 wrote:

Cheers, I'll have a look into that, I tried to start reading Capital Vol I. with David Harvey's book but I gave up about a quarter of the way through as I wasn't really keeping pace. This sounds like a better introduction however so I'll give it a go.

just so you know, the first 3 chapters of Capital volume 1 are by far the most tough going. After that it gets pretty straightforward. It's definitely a good book to read at some point so I would recommend having a go again when you have some time!

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Jul 15 2013 14:03
gmtx725 wrote:
Some general accessible writings on social science, critical theory, social theory etc would be good. All of this is very different from what I'm used to, especially the methods of inquiry, so I'm basically starting from scratch here.

I would guess that most libcom posters, even those who ended up doing some kind of humanities course at uni, are probably self-taught in this stuff. Which is tricky, cos it means there isn't an obvious 101 or reading list to point to in the way there is with a taught course.

On the other hand, i think it's important to trust your instincts. If something doesn't make sense, query it. If something seems to rely on questionable assumptions, question them. I know this is easier said than done, and sometimes obscure theoretical language can be used to deliberately obscure things and baffle 'outsiders' (Michel Foucault - probably one of the most cited humanities scholars - admitted to this).

Sometimes theory is hard because the concepts are hard or the ideas are counter-intuitive (challenging deeply held beliefs can be hard even when the prose is really clear). But in my experience, 9 times out of 10 it's hard cos it's using unfamiliar shorthand or jargon (which can easily be explained, looked up, or paraphrased), the author themselves isn't that clear what they're saying, or because it's polemic and bluster masquerading as analysis.

Maybe there needs to be critical theory/thinking 101 resources in the same way there's organising 101 resources... If anyone knows anything good, or has ideas what such a 101 would contain, please post it up.

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Jul 15 2013 23:41
Joseph Kay wrote:
I saw this guide to queer theory linked earlier: http://critical-theory.com/what-the-fuck-is-queer-theory/ - I haven't checked if that site has other similar introductions yet.

First time seeing that website, informative and funny. That article links to the ICC. grin

Reading some of the other articles, one on unknown facts about Deleuze & Guattari was great. Guattari seemed like a bit of a dick.

gmtx725
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Jul 15 2013 23:30
Joseph Kay wrote:
On the other hand, i think it's important to trust your instincts. If something doesn't make sense, query it. If something seems to rely on questionable assumptions, question them. I know this is easier said than done, and sometimes obscure theoretical language can be used to deliberately obscure things and baffle 'outsiders' (Michel Foucault - probably one of the most cited humanities scholars - admitted to this).

Sometimes theory is hard because the concepts are hard or the ideas are counter-intuitive (challenging deeply held beliefs can be hard even when the prose is really clear). But in my experience, 9 times out of 10 it's hard cos it's using unfamiliar shorthand or jargon (which can easily be explained, looked up, or paraphrased), the author themselves isn't that clear what they're saying, or because it's polemic and bluster masquerading as analysis.

I'm well aware of the charges of obscurantism levelled at a lot of these kind of philosophers. (indeed, I'm about to read Sokal and Bricmont's Intellectual Impostures), I think coming from a scientific background myself your gut instinct is to be quite dismissive towards a lot of social science/critical theory etc because of this. But I'm trying to get around that, I reasoned these are areas I know literally nothing about and I can't pass judgement on something I don't understand. Besides, there must be merit in a lot of these ideas, it's implausible that an entire field of thought is simply obscurantist nonsense. Sure there are a few charlatans (I hear Lacan and Derrida are particularly bad offenders) but from what I've read people like Foucault had genuine ideas, but masked in difficult language simply because that was the culture of the time.

Joseph Kay wrote:
Maybe there needs to be critical theory/thinking 101 resources in the same way there's organising 101 resources... If anyone knows anything good, or has ideas what such a 101 would contain, please post it up.

I think something along those lines would be an invaluable resource... In fact there are so many great resources on libcom I think that's one of the only areas missing.

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Jul 16 2013 05:33
gmtx725 wrote:
I've already read things like the Anarchist FAQ, and Berkman's the ABC of Anarchism,

really? you read the anarchist faq? like the WHOLE thing? if you did, you shouldn't need to read much else, comrade! that thing's like, what, 6000+ pages? seems to cover almost every conceivable question about anarchism. i've only read a few hundred pages, myself.

anyways... here's my recommendations:

(book) - Black Flame (this is what i read when i was a newbie to anarchism, it was extremely helpful. i no longer felt like a newbie after reading just this one book. combines theory and history. i highly recommend it.)

(book) - Revolutionary Rehearsals (this is NOT an anarchist text, it is written by what seem to be left trotskyists, but it is extremely valuable for pointing out what were the failures of near revolutions, so that we can learn what mistakes to avoid in future opportunities. all you have to do when reading it is ignore everything they say about needing a vanguard party to take state power. but they surprisingly don't mention this very often. mostly they talk about the importance of "the leadership of ideas", which is compatible with anarchist revolutionary strategy. there are five chapters with five case studies - france, chile, portugal, iran, poland.)

(debate, article length) - Parecon or Libertarian Communism? http://libcom.org/library/participatory-society-or-libertarian-communism (this will give you an introduction to two different visions of how the "economy" (production and distribution) should be organized in an anarchist society post-revolution.)

(article) - Parpolity http://www.zcommunications.org/parpolity-political-vision-for-a-good-society-by-stephen1-shalom (this has a good description of one possible way of organizing federalism and political decision making bodies. parpolity is associated with parecon, which i think has certain problems, but parpolity seems good and really helped me understand how federalism could function, something which confused the heck out of me for a long time.)

(book) - Conquest of Bread (to me this isn't really going to give you a better understanding of anarchism in the technical sense, but it will give you a beautiful philosophical underpinning for anarchism, and in passionate poetic language. not a must read, IMO, but still thought it should make the list.)

gmtx725 wrote:
With that in mind, I was wondering if people could point me in the direction of some key texts that will enable me to contribute to this site.

even from what you've read so far, you can already start contributing to this site. you're probably more knowledgeable than you're giving yourself credit for. and none of us here have all the answers. expressing ideas and getting responses from others is part of your/our learning process, not something to do after you've figured it all out. i think we will benefit from hearing what you have to say! so don't be shy! grin

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Jul 21 2013 21:44

oh! i forgot to mention the author wayne price. he's been a huge help to me in developing my anarchist politics. i recommend reading anything you can by him.

a lot of his articles are available free online, and many of them can be found here: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/authors/Wayne_Price.html

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Jul 22 2013 09:17
ultraviolet wrote:
oh! i forgot to mention the author wayne price. he's been a huge help to me in developing my anarchist politics. i recommend reading anything you can by him.

a lot of his articles are available free online, and many of them can be found here: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/authors/Wayne_Price.html

I would give the big qualification that while a lot of the stuff he writes is good, us that were libcom at least would agree with him on most of it apart from when he starts talking about nationalism, which for us is pretty significant.

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Jul 22 2013 19:22
Steven. wrote:
ultraviolet wrote:
oh! i forgot to mention the author wayne price. he's been a huge help to me in developing my anarchist politics. i recommend reading anything you can by him.

a lot of his articles are available free online, and many of them can be found here: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/authors/Wayne_Price.html

I would give the big qualification that while a lot of the stuff he writes is good, us that were libcom at least would agree with him on most of it apart from when he starts talking about nationalism, which for us is pretty significant.

What's his position on nationalism?

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Jul 23 2013 06:28

I really like the recent book Fighting For Ourselves - http://libcom.org/library/fighting-ourselves-anarcho-syndicalism-class-s... - and I recommend it highly.

gmtx725 wrote:
I tried to start reading Capital Vol I. with David Harvey's book but I gave up about a quarter of the way through as I wasn't really keeping pace. This sounds like a better introduction however so I'll give it a go.

I quite like that Heinrich book so far, I'm reading it now.

If you make another go at Capital and get stuck again, you might try changing up the order in which you read it. This may sound weird but the book has parts that are relatively discrete from each other. Read Marx's Value, Price, and Profit, which is way shorter and gets at the basic concepts and vocabulary. If you get bogged down in details, just keep going and don't sweat it, just keep going (Marx sometimes sets up puzzles and suggests solutions that are a bit of a dead end, so sometimes first time readers who are confused are actually right where Marx seems to have wanted them to be. Then when you go to Capital, read chapter 26 to the end. That bit's more readable and exciting. Then read chapters 4-25. Then read chapters 1-3 at the end. That order puts the most readable bits first and the least readable bits last, and my view the beginning of the book is sort of meant to be re-read at the end anyway (the stuff in the beginning looks different in light of the entire book).

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Jul 27 2013 21:45

Shit, well Nate has just beat me to it. I mean, literally, I was about to say the same thing:

The first three chapter of Das Kapital are like banging your head against a wall. First read Value, Price, and Profit. Then start Capital. Begin at 26, then 4 - 25, then 1 - 3. And if you still want more, go with Heinrich.

Also, FFO. That too.

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Jul 28 2013 07:38

gmt, if you're still sticking around, this might be of use for you as well:

http://libcom.org/blog/books-have-shaped-my-politics-08052012

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Jul 28 2013 16:26

Here's my reading list I recently posted on another topic. I think it may be useful here also:

Ingersoll wrote:
How is it going, iexist? I'm a bit late, but would still give a few reading suggestions.

I would suggest Communism: Not a 'nice idea' but a material necessity. Although loaded with Marxism ('historical materialism', 'decadence') it is really a good introduction to communism and workers movement history, one of the best I have read recently.

Also, Cornelius Castoriadis, Workers' Councils and the Economics of Self-managed Society. With a really good preface by the Solidarity group this book (you can print it) deals with questions of 'self-government' by workers' councils, its functioning in the community and the transformation of technology in socialism. Very interesting is the part that deals with the question of "centralisation".

Similar to the topics above (Castoriadis) is Ken Knabb's The Joy Of Revolution, at least the chapter 4. (Rebirth).

After this, Cyril Smith, Marx at the Millenium. I would also suggest reading his speech on the Communist Manifesto, but it is not avaible in printed form (as far as I know). The book goes through the work of Marx in order to try to understand Marx’s real ideas and what they have to say about our present situation and is very nicely written. Really, really good look at Marx's thought, which breaks myths on Marx as a bearer of some theory of history, a doctrinaire that is thinking through some mechanical model of history (or an "integral world outlook") - therefore, being very important for us as libertarians.

Also,

gmtx725 wrote:
Cheers, I'll have a look into that, I tried to start reading Capital Vol I. with David Harvey's book but I gave up about a quarter of the way through as I wasn't really keeping pace.

Harvey can be of help, but I would never suggest Capital for beginning.

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Jul 28 2013 20:19
Agent of the Fifth International wrote:
Steven. wrote:
ultraviolet wrote:
oh! i forgot to mention the author wayne price. he's been a huge help to me in developing my anarchist politics. i recommend reading anything you can by him.

a lot of his articles are available free online, and many of them can be found here: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/authors/Wayne_Price.html

I would give the big qualification that while a lot of the stuff he writes is good, us that were libcom at least would agree with him on most of it apart from when he starts talking about nationalism, which for us is pretty significant.

What's his position on nationalism?

basically he is supportive of national liberation movements (see this forum thread with a bunch of his quotes: http://libcom.org/forums/nefac/question-0)

Mike S.
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Jul 28 2013 20:38
Steven. wrote:
Agent of the Fifth International wrote:
Steven. wrote:
ultraviolet wrote:
oh! i forgot to mention the author wayne price. he's been a huge help to me in developing my anarchist politics. i recommend reading anything you can by him.

a lot of his articles are available free online, and many of them can be found here: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/authors/Wayne_Price.html

I would give the big qualification that while a lot of the stuff he writes is good, us that were libcom at least would agree with him on most of it apart from when he starts talking about nationalism, which for us is pretty significant.

What's his position on nationalism?

basically he is supportive of national liberation movements (see this forum thread with a bunch of his quotes: http://libcom.org/forums/nefac/question-0)

I post on RevLeft under a different name and the topic of national liberation movements came up. This may be a discussion for another thread so sorry if I'm off topic here but the gist is many people, anarchists included (not just on RevLeft but within the actual "community" here in the US) think any oppressed group has a right to "self determination" all the way to the point of nationalist separatism, as in, black people forming their own state, women, gays, etc. It's mind boggling to me, this sort of separatist nationalism, but to even question it, as I've seen a couple people do, accusations of racism are thrown around. This is based in the "check your privilege" privilege theory where oppressed peoples should come up with their own solution's without members of oppressor groups telling them what to do. How do we navigate these complex waters? We being the people who are against separatist nationalism, let alone nationalism in general.

gmtx725
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Jul 28 2013 22:46

Some excellent suggestions in this thread, thanks guys, you've given me a lot to work through! Just finished reading The Conquest of Bread, and found it quite accessible, plenty to agree with as well smile I did however find Kropotkin's analysis a little dated at times, most of the ideas translate well to our modern society but a few did not. I also thought he could be over-optimistic at times, magicking away complex problems with 'the workers will surely sort it out' etc . On the whole though a very good read.

Not sure what I'll move on to next but going of people's advice so far I may leave it a while before tackling Capital again- and when I do I'll try reading in the revised order and follow some of the other suggestions posted here.

I'm still after some good suggestions on topics like critical theory, social science etc. Even aside from political concerns, just out of pure curiosity this is an area I'd like to educate myself on

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Jul 29 2013 00:38

http://syndicalist.us/theory/anarchism-an-introductory-bibliography/ (a long and comprehensive reading list for people interested in anarchism compiled by James Herod.) Below is just 5% of it I assume, it covers almost everything.

Getting Started

Kropotkin, Peter, Anarchism and Anarchist Communism: Its Basis and Principles. Freedom Press, 1987, 64 pages. Two short introductions to anarchism, including Kropotkin’s famous article for the 1910 edition of Encyclopedia Britannica.
Malatesta, Errico, Anarchy. Freedom Press, 1974, 54 pages.
Walter, Nicolas, About Anarchism (1969). Freedom Press, 2002, 93 pages.
Dolgoff, Sam, The Relevance of Anarchism to Modern Society (1977). Tucson, Arizona, See Sharp Press, 2001, 18 pages.
Bufe, Chaz, Anarchism: What It Is & What It Isn’t. Tucson, Arizona: See Sharp Press, 2003, 12 pages.

General Introductions

Ward, Colin, Anarchy in Action. London: Freedom Press, 1973, 2nd edition 1982, 152 pages.
Kropotkin, Peter, Anarchism: A Collection of Revolutionary Writings. New York: Dover, 2002, 336 pages. (This is a reprint of the 1927 collection, Kropotkin’s Revolutionary Pamphlets.)
Goldman, Emma, Anarchism and Other Essays (1917). New York: Dover, 1969, 271 pages.
Berkman, Alexander, What Is Anarchism? (1929). Oakland: AK Press, 2003, 237 pages. (This is the complete book in one volume. It was often previously published in two volumes.)
Guerin, Daniel, Anarchism: From Theory to Practice (1970). Monthly Review Press, 1996, 166 pages.
Meltzer, Albert, Anarchism: Arguments For and Against (1981). Oakland: AK Press, 1996, 71 pages.
Rocker, Rudolf, Anarcho-Syndicalism (1938). London: Pluto Press, 1989, 166 pages.
Harper, Clifford, Anarchy: A Graphic Guide. Camden Press, 1987, 196 pages.

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Jul 29 2013 00:37

Michael Bakunin (1814-1876)
Bakunin on Anarchy: Selected Works by the Activist-Founder of World Anarchism. Edited, translated, and with an introduction by Sam Dolgoff. Preface by Paul Avrich. New York: Knopf, 1972, 405 pages.
Statism and Anarchy (1873). Cambridge U.P., 1990, 243 pages.
God and the State (1871). Introduction by Paul Avrich. Dover, 1970, 89 pages.
Marxism, Freedom, and the State. Compiled by KI. J. Kenafick. London: Freedom Press, 1950, 64 pages.
Morris, Brian, Bakunin: The Philosophy of Freedom. Montreal: Black Rose Books, 1993, 159 pages.
Leier, Mark, Bakunin: The Creative Passion. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2006, 350 pages.
Other compilations of Bakunin’s writings are by Richard Cutler, Arthur Lehning, and G.P. Maximoff. A CD of his complete works is available in French from the International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam.
See also studies by E. H. Carr, Anthony Masters, Richard Saltman, T. R. Ravindranathan, and K.J. Kenafick.
Louise Michel (1830-1905)
The Red Virgin: Memoirs of Louise Michel (1886). Edited and translated by Bullitt Lowry and Elizabeth Ellington Gunter. Tuscaloosa: Alabama University Press, 1981, 220 pages.
Thomas, Edith, Louise Michel. Montreal: Black Rose Books, 1980, 440 pages.
Mclellan, Nic, editor, Louise Michel. New York: Ocean Press, 2004, 115 pages.
Peter Kropotkin (1842-1921)
Kropotkin’s Revolutionary Pamphlets. (1927), with an introduction, biographical sketch, and bibliography. Reprinted 1968, Benjamin Blom, New York, 307 pages. Reprinted again as Anarchism, Dover, 2002, 336 pages.
Words of a Rebel (1895). Montreal: Black Rose Books, 1992, 229 pages.
The above two books are excellent entries into Kropotkin. Black Rose Books has been republishing Kropotkin in eleven volumes. The major works are: Conquest of Bread; Fields, Factories, and Workshops; Mutual Aid; Memoirs of a Revolutionist; In Russian and French Prisons; Russian Literature; The Great French Revolution; and Ethics.
Morris, Brian, Kropotkin: The Politics of Community. Amherst, New York: Prometheus Books, 2004, 314 pages.
See also studies by George Woodcock, Graham Purchase, Martin A. Miller, and Stephen Osofsky.
Errico Malatesta (1850-1932)
Errico Malatesta: His Life & Ideas. Compiled and edited by Vernon Richards, Freedom Press, 1965, 309 pages.
The Anarchist Revolution: Polemical Articles 1924-1931. London: Freedom Press, 1995, 123 pages. Edited and introduced by Vernon Richards.
At the Café: Conversations on Anarchism. Liberty, Tennessee: Fifth Estate Books, 2006, 160 pages.
Emma Goldman (1869-1940)
Red Emma Speaks: An Emma Goldman Reader (1972). Compiled and edited by Alix Kates Shulman, with a new introduction and three new essays, Schocken Books, 1983, 460 pages.
Anarchism and Other Essays (1910), With a new introduction by Richard Drinnon, Dover, 1969, 271 pages.
Vision on Fire: Emma Goldman on the Spanish Revolution. Edited by David Porter (1983). Oakland: AK Press, 2006, 347 pages.
My Disillusionment in Russia, and My Further Disillusionment with Russia (1923, 1924). Reprinted in one volume, Dover, 2003, 263 pages.
The Social Significance of Modern Drama. The Applause Theatre Book Publishers, 1987, 192 pages.
Living My Life (1931). Dover, 1970, 2 volumes.
Nowhere at Home: Letters from Exile of Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, edited by Richard and Anna Maria Drinnon. Schocken Books, 1975, 282 pages.
Drinnon, Richard, Rebel in Paradise: A Biography of Emma Goldman. Chicago University Press, 1961, 349 pages.
See also studies and biographies by Alix Shulman, Bonnie Haaland, Candice Falk, Alice Wexler, and C. Brid Nicholson.
Alexander Berkman (1870-1936)
Life of an Anarchist: The Alexander Berkman Reader. Edited by Gene Fellner, New York: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1992, 354 pages.
The Bolshevik Myth (1925). London: Pluto Press, 1989, 342 pages.
Berkman, Alexander, What Is Anarchism? (1929). Oakland: AK Press, 2003, 237 pages. (This is the complete book in one volume. It was often previously published in two volumes, variously titled: The ABC of Anarchism; What is Anarchist Communism?)
The Russian Tragedy (1922). London: Phoenix Press, 1968, 81 pages. This edition also includes The Kronstadt Rebellion and The Russian Revolution and the Communist Party.
Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist (1912). Pittsburgh: Frontier Press, 1970, 538 pages.
Gustav Landauer (1870-1919)
Revolution and Other Writings: A Political Reader. Edited and translated by Gabriel Kuhn. Oakland: PM Press, 2010, 352 pages.
For Socialism (1911). St. Louis: Telos Press, 1978, 150 pages.
Lunn, Eugene, Prophet of Community: The Romantic Socialism of Gustav Landauer. California University Press, 1973, 434 pages.
Maurer, Charles B., Call to Revolution: The Mystical Anarchism of Gustav Landauer. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1971, 218 pages.
Rudolf Rocker (1873-1958)
Anarcho-Syndicalism (1938). Pluto Press, 1989, 166 pages
Nationalism and Culture (1933). St. Paul: Michael Coughlin, 1978, 614 pages.
The London Years (1956). Oakland: AK Press, 2005, 228 pages.
Graur, Mina, An Anarchist “Rabbi”: The Life and Teachings of Rudolf Rocker. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997, 272 pages.
Ricardo Flores Magon (1874-1922)
Dreams of Freedom: A Ricardo Flores Magon Reader. Edited by Chaz Bufe and Mitchell Cowen Venter. Oakland: AK Press, 2005, 420 pages.
Albro, Ward S., Always a Rebel: Ricardo Flores Magon and the Mexican Revolution. Fort Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1992, 219 pages.
Sylvia Pankhurst (1882-1960)
A Sylvia Pankhurst Reader. Edited by Kathryn Dodd. Manchester University Press, 1993, 248 pages.
Romero, Patricia W., E. Sylvia Pankhurst: Portrait of a Radical. Yale University Press, 1987, 334 pages.
Nestor Makhno (1889-1934)
The Struggle Against the State and Other Essays. Oakland: AK Press, 1996, 114 pages.
The three volumes of Makhno’s memoirs have been published by Black Cat Press, Edmonton, Alberta, as The Russian Revolution in the Ukraine, Under the Blows of the Counterrevolution, and The Ukrainian Revolution.
Arshinov, Peter, History of the Makhnovist Movement 1918-1921. Detroit: Black & Red, 1974, 284 pages.
Skirda, Alexandre, Nestor Makhno: Anarchy’s Cossack. Oakland: AK Press, 2004, 415 pages.

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Aug 1 2013 20:32

Thanks for the reading lists everybody - I would definately recommend Black Flame as an introduction to anarchism, syndicalism and other forms of worker organisation.

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Aug 1 2013 21:46
Komadori wrote:
Thanks for the reading lists everybody - I would definately recommend Black Flame as an introduction to anarchism, syndicalism and other forms of worker organisation.

What I would also do is use Black Flame's bibliography as a source for worthwhile texts. It makes for a really good guide as well.