Anti-Maduro demonstrations in Venezuela

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Tyrion
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Feb 14 2014 00:36
Anti-Maduro demonstrations in Venezuela
Al Jazeera wrote:
At least four people have been killed, including a police officer, after thousands of Venezuelans opposing President Nicolas Maduro took to the streets of Caracas following two weeks of anti-government protests across the country.

Gunfire erupted in the centre of the capital when armed members of a pro-government vigilante group arrived on motorcycles and began firing at more than 100 anti-Maduro student protesters clashing with security forces, the AP news agency reported.

[..]

Across town, Maduro told his supporters that he would not back down in the face of what he said was a conspiracy by opponents to provoke violence and destabilise his government.

"A Nazi-fascist faction has emerged that wants to take Venezuela down the path of violence," the 51-year-old former bus driver said. "What we're going to have is peace and prosperity."

Protests also took place on Wednesday in other cities, including Merida and San Cristobal, where students have clashed with police in recent days.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2014/02/venezuela-anti-government...

rooieravotr
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Feb 20 2014 05:27

The Aljazeera report quoted above says

Quote:
Gunfire erupted in the centre of the capital when armed members of a pro-government vigilante group arrived on motorcycles and began firing at more than 100 anti-Maduro student protesters clashing with security forces, the AP news agency reported.

This is one, and only one, version of what happened. Other news reports talk about armed opposition activists as responsible for the deadly violence.

Quote:
Both state owned and independent pro-government outlets alleged that Wednesday’s violence, including the two murders which occurred near the Attorney General’s office, was planned by right-wing opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez and perpetrated by radical armed opposition groups.

says a summary of news reportson the Venezuanalysis website, a generally pro-Chavista source. Dutch press basically says that both sides blame each other for the violence.

There is, I think, no telling who did at the moment. What is clear is that this is a very right wing opposition movement, against a government that tends to treat any opposition, right and left, as a halfway house to sedition and treason. Not much sides to be taken for anarchists, I would say..

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Steven.
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Feb 17 2014 20:17

Yeah, I was just about to post in the forums asking if anyone knew more about this, after seeing this photo gallery:
http://www.reuters.com/news/pictures/slideshow?articleId=USRTX18PJY#a=1

does anyone know more about the make-up of the protests? The official "opposition" are reactionary of course, and looking at the photographs the only visible symbols are the national flag, which is never a good sign…

vicent
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Feb 21 2014 06:04

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/20/venezuelas-poor-protests-ch...
Venezuela's poor join protests as turmoil grips Chávez's revolution

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Feb 21 2014 07:08
Steven. wrote:
does anyone know more about the make-up of the protests? The official "opposition" are reactionary of course, and looking at the photographs the only visible symbols are the national flag, which is never a good sign…

Angry, young disenfranchised proletarios stirring up an insurectionary moment

Drakula25
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Feb 21 2014 18:37

I hope you're joking.

radicalgraffiti
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Feb 21 2014 19:00

you hope who is joking about what?

Mr. Natural
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Feb 21 2014 19:19

Protests, whatever their politics, are only going to grow in Venezuela. Hugo Chavez may have been fun at times as he tweaked Uncle Sam's nose, but he was a populist, demagogic egomaniac who squandered Venezuela's oil assets on various self-serving international political gestures and left the economy in a growing shambles. Venezuelan oil for Cuban medicine and other such policies may have temporarily benefited the poor, but the economy has lost its base, and reaction and popular unrest can only increase.

And now we have Maduro, who seems to be the essence of a stooge. This is probably going to get really ugly.

Drakula25
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Feb 22 2014 14:00

Wait, what?

You guys seem to have a different viewpoint on Chavez than I do. I reject the idea that his policies or party are ideal, but I have always had a soft spot for him because the statistics seem to indicate that he did, in fact, dramatically reduce poverty.

Likewise, my understanding is that the current riot mobs are mostly right-wing extremists and fascists, the same brand that had tried overthrowing the Chavez government in the past with US backing. I have been looking at them with the same suspicion with which I am looking at the demonstrators in Ukraine. That is, I do not support the state's violent repression (I also heard they cut internet today), but I am weary of the goals and demands of the demonstrators themselves.

Do you guys believe that the demonstrations in Venezuela are based on some kind of legitimate economic grievances, and if so, what are they? Is there a case to say that this is a reactionary, right-wing nationalist/fascist uprising, as Maduro is claiming?

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Feb 22 2014 16:39
Quote:
Summary of Venezuela’s situation for curious people and/or the poorly informed
- February 21st, 2014 -

Rafael Uzcategui [from El Libertario newspaper]

On February 4th, 2014, students from the Universidad Nacional Experimental del Tachira (Experimental University of Táchira), located on an inland state of the country, protested due to the sexual assault of a fellow female classmate in lieu of the current insecurity situation of the city.
The protest was repressed, and several students were detained.

The next day, other universities around the country had their own protests requesting the release of these detainees, being at the same time repressed and some of them incarcerated. The wave of indignation had the context of the economic crisis, the shortage of first necessity items and the crisis of basics public services, as well as the beginning of the enforcement of an economic plan on behalf of the President Nicolas Maduro.

Two opposing politicians, Leopoldo Lopez, and Maria Corina Machado, tried to capitalize on the wave of discontent rallying for new protests under the slogan “The Way Out” and try to pressure for the resignation of president Maduro. Their message also reflected the rupture and divisions on the inside of opposing politicians and the desire to replace Henrique Capriles’ leadership, who publicly rejected the protests. The Mesa de la Unidad Democratica (Democratic Unity Table) coalition, didn’t support them either.

When the government suppressed the protests, it made them grow bigger and wider all over the country. On February 12th, 2014, people from 18 cities protested for the release of all of the detainees and in rejection of the government. In some cities, inland, particularly punished by scarcity and lack of proper public services, the protests were massive. In Caracas, three people were murdered during the protests. The government blames the protesters, but the biggest circulating newspaper in the country, Ultimas Noticias (Latest News), who receives the biggest advertising budget from the government, reveals through photographs, that the murderers were police officers. As a response to this, Nicolas Maduro stated on National television and radio broadcast that police enforcement had been “infiltrated by the right wing”.

Repression against protesters not only uses police and military enforcement agencies, it incorporates the participation of militia groups to violently dissolve the protests. A member of PROVEA, a human rights NGO, was kidnapped, beaten and threatened to death by one of then on the west side of Caracas. President Maduro has publicly encouraged these groups, which he calls “colectivos” (collectives).

The Venezuelan government actually controls all of the TV stations, and has threatened with sanctions, radio stations and newspapers that transmit information about protests. Because of this, the privileged space for the distribution of information has been the social media networks, specially twitter. The use of personal technological devices has allowed the record keeping through videos and photographs of ample aggressions of the repression forces.

Human rights organizations report detainees all over the country (many of them already released), the number has surpassed 400, and they have suffered tortures, including reports of sexual assault, cruel treatment, inhumane and degrading. As this is being written 5 people have been murdered in the context of the protests.

In his speeches, Nicolas Maduro, stimulates the protesters that are against him to assume even more radical and violent positions. Without any criminalistic investigation, he automatically stated that each deceased person has been murdered by the same protesters, whom he disqualifies permanently with all of the possible adjectives.

However, this belligerence seems not to be shared by all the chavista movement, because a lot of it’s bases are waiting for what happens next, without any expressions of support. Maduro has only managed to rally public employees to the street protests he has done. In spite of the situation and due to the grave economic situation he faces, Nicolas Maduro continues to make economic adjustments, being the most recent, the increase of the tax unit.

The state apparatus reiterates repeatedly that it is facing a “coup”, that what happened in Venezuela on April 2002 will repeat itself. This version has managed to neutralize the international left wing, which hasn’t even expressed its concern about the abuses and deaths in the protests.

The protests are done in many parts around the country and are lacking in center and direction, having being called through social media networks.
In the protesters themselves, there are many diverse opinions about opposing political parties, by which it is possible to find so many expressions of support and rejection at the same time.

In the case of Caracas they are starred specially by middle class sectors and college students. On the other hand, in other states, other popular sectors have joined the protests. In Caracas the majority of the petitions are political, freedom for the detainees y the resignations of the president, while in other cities social demands are incorporated, such as inflation, scarcity and lack of proper public services. Even though some protests have turned violent, and some protesters have used fire guns against police and militia groups, the majority of the protests, specially outside of Caracas, remain peaceful.

The Revolutionary Independent Venezuelan Left (anarchists, sectors that follow Trotsky, Marx, Lenin and Guevara) don’t have any incidence in this situation and we are simple spectators. Some of us are simply actively denouncing state repression and helping the victims of human rights violations.

Venezuela is a historically oil driven country, it possesses low levels of political culture amongst its population, explaining why the opposing protesters have the same “content” problem as the bases of support for the government. But while the international left wing continues to give its back, and support without any criticism the government’s version of “the coup”, it leave thousands of protesters to the mercy of the most conservative of opposition’s political parties, without any reference to anti-capitalists, revolutionaries and true social change that could influence them.

In this sense, the detention of Leopoldo Lopez, conservative opposition leader, tries to make his own figure the center of a dynamic movement, that up until this moment, that this is been written, had surpassed the political parties of the opposition and the government of Nicolas Maduro.

What will happen in the short term? I think nobody knows exactly, especially the protesters themselves. The events are developing minute after minute.

For more alternative information about Venezuela, we recommend:
http://periodicoellibertario.blogspot.com (in Spanish) http://www.derechos.org.ve (in Spanish) http://laclase.info (in Spanish) http://www.nodo50.org/ellibertario (in Spanish, English & other languages)

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Feb 22 2014 16:26

www.youtube.com/user/Anarquistas3

* Venezuela: Policias reprimen en las calles de Caracas
* Cesurado en Venezuela Ataque a estudiantes en la Av Carabobo San Cristobal Tachira
* Cesurado en Venezuela Policías en Maracaibo Arremeten contra Jovenes estudiantes
* Video Cesurado en Venezuela Policia de Aragua Golpeando
* En Venezuela la policia mata a balazos a Bassil Alejandro Dacosta Frias
* Policias en Venezuela disparan BALAS contra Estudiantes en Caracas
* Policía de Venezuela en Mérida golpea salvajemente a estudiantes indefensos 11/02/2014
* Video Cesurado Policia en Merida Venezuela arremete contra las personas
* Cesurado en Venezuela Policia de Aragua derriba puerta de un centro asistencial
* Video Cesurado en Venezuela San Cristóbal Militares golpean a un ciudadano LaVerdad
* Cesurado en Venezuela Policías Golpean a mujer en Base Aragua, Maracay Venezuela
* Cesurado en Venezuela, la policia disparan y mata un joven y reprimen a los estudiantes
* Video Cesurado en Venezuela, la Policia reprime y mata a estudiantes 12/02/2014

Mr. Natural
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Feb 22 2014 20:13

AES, Thanks for the info, which pretty much assessed the situation in Venezuela as I had perceived it. What a mess! I checked El Libertario, too, which turns out to be a reliable source. So what is the Revolutionary Independent Venezuelan Left going to do, stuck as it is between the "left" hack, Maduro, and the growing diverse but ultimately right-wing forces "Maduroism" and a failing economy is generating?

As an example of Maduro's seeming complete lack of any real left theory or understanding, I offer his recent tirade against Venezuela's violent television soap operas in which he charged them with responsibility for Venezuela's spiraling murder rate. How idealistic of him! As a Marxist, I would have thought that the high murder rate and the consequent violent television shows would be a reflection of material social relations.

I identify with Drakula25's lament concerning the situations in the Ukraine and Venezuela. Western imperialism will have a harder time having its way in the Ukraine with Putin next door, but there is no such "protection" for Venezuela, and the various imperialist intelligence agencies have got to be licking their lips and working their asses off on this.

Well, I won't cry when Western imperialism gets Maduro, as I did when it destroyed Allende, but I sure empathize with the left chavistas who seem stuck in the middle of this mess with no place to go.

Drakula25
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Feb 22 2014 21:04

Mr. Natural,

I don't share your disregard for Maduro (or Allende). I might feel more like that if we were talking about Saddam Hussein, or Qaddafi, or the like, but I think Maduro/Chavez and Allende were fairly worthy alternatives so long as the anti-state left groups in Chile and Venezuela continue to, well, remain practically non-existent. They have no base, and I'm guessing they are rife with the same kind of incoherent politics that is found among many other anarchist outfits. Barring their success, why shouldn't we eye Maduro with our (only) hope?

redsdisease
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Feb 23 2014 01:21
Drakula25 wrote:
Barring their success, why shouldn't we eye Maduro with our (only) hope?

Because communist politics isn't about choosing the "best" political actor to get behind in a given situation, it's about supporting the working class in it's struggle for it's own independent interests.

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Feb 23 2014 01:30
Drakula25 wrote:
so long as the anti-state left groups in the USSR continue to, well, remain practically non-existent. They have no base, and I'm guessing they are rife with the same kind of incoherent politics that is found among many other anarchist outfits. Barring their success, why shouldn't we eye Stalin with our (only) hope?

fixed.

teh
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Feb 23 2014 02:52
Mr. Natural wrote:
but he was a populist, demagogic egomaniac who squandered Venezuela's oil assets on various self-serving international political gestures and left the economy in a growing shambles. Venezuelan oil for Cuban medicine and other such policies may have temporarily benefited the poor, but the economy has lost its base, and reaction and popular unrest can only increase.

This is Western propaganda. The Venezuelan economy is exactly where it was when Chavez was first elected in 1998: a poor, high inflation, oil dependent (shipping chiefly to it's imperialist master USA) neoliberal economy. Even the state sector of the economy, the bastion of all social democrats, is a smaller percentage of gdp today then it was before Chavez, not to mention the 1970's at the height of right wing reaction. If the Venezuelan government carried out some foreign inverter demands like devaluation and agreed to fully submit itself to the US then you'd be reading puff pieces about how prudent and pragmatic the socialists are like the press describes conservatives such as Morales in Bolivia. Or that piece of crap ex-Tupamaro Jose Mujica gets a new pr spread every month or so in the Western press -as in the Guardian, NYT, Daily Mail- doing his Dalai Lama routine about how "humble" and benevolent he is and the Economist magazine gives his country the best of year award (his terrorist group killed the US ambassador!), meanwhile Tupamaros in Venezuela are "thugs", "colectivos" - a favorite tactic of of the Anglophone media to leave untranslated words relating to enemy factions, like "janjaweed or "shabiha," to make them sound foreign and hence dangerous- whose deaths in clashes with/attacks by anti-government protests are to be regarded as deserving if not celebrated.

Mr. Natural wrote:
Well, I won't cry when Western imperialism gets Maduro, as I did when it destroyed Allende, but I sure empathize with the left chavistas who seem stuck in the middle of this mess with no place to go.

What does Allende got on Maduro?

And if Western imperialism gets Maduro you shouldn't empathize with left chavistas, who have been the main mediators of workers political and economic subjugation, but for the Venezuelan working class because the when the liberals come to power they're going to devaluate and implement austerity to re-stabilize the economy, unlike Maduro's endless vacillation.

Drakula25
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Feb 23 2014 08:59

You're comparing Maduro to Stalin? Is thst to make Maduro sound bad or Stalin sound non-genocidal?

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Feb 23 2014 14:18

I feel like this article is very relevant right now: Ciccariello-Maher-An-Anarchism-that-Is-Not-Anarchism.pdf

"This pernicious dynamic continues well into the present, making Venezuela a notoriously difficult subject for anarchists to even discuss, much less to discuss coherently and in a principled manner. The danger arises from self-identified anarchists of wealthier countries identifying themselves automatically and uncritically with the self-identified anarchists of the Third World countries. This is something that I have observed on countless occasions: a U.S. anarchist visits Venezuela to get an understanding of the political process, seeks out Venezuelan “anarchists,” and thereby establishes a closed circuit in which what is learned about Venezuelan politics was what one sought out in the first place."

"The two sides of this closed circuit together constitute what I call “anarchist imperialism,” but this phenomenon is not limited, as we saw as well in our discussion above, to the word “anarchism.” The first implication, as we saw above, is the danger of U.S. and European anarchists identifying a priori with the “explicitly anarchist viewpoint,” i.e., those who self-identify as “anarchists.” In the Venezuelan context, the danger of such a gesture is exceptionally potent: due in part to the relative absence of such self-identified anarchists, the mantle of “anarchist” belongs to a very small number, including the small group operating around the newspaper El Libertario, who—by virtue of the attention granted by foreign anarchists—enjoy far more influence internationally than their domestic organizing would merit. And beyond the group’s utter lack of a social base, it is worth noting the reactionary positions they assumed in the past: while millions were pouring into the streets to organize popular resistance to the coup that briefly overthrew Chávez in April of 2002, El Libertario refused to support Chávez’s return to power (thereby driving out many of their more radical comrades)."

"This damning error of political judgment, moreover, was not accidental but was instead closely related to the “critique of all oppressions” logic dissected above. This is perhaps best expressed in the statement by an associate of El Libertario that “we are neither for Chávez, nor for Fedecamaras or the CTV or the Coordinadora Democrática.” It is incomprehensible on either a theoretical or a practical level to draw any sort of equivalence between the Chávez government and its quasi-fascist opponents, but it should not surprise us when dogmatic anarchists insist on doing so. While the editors of El Libertario are quick to insist that their position of “uncompromising opposition to Chavismo is not simply the result of a mechanical application of anarchist theory,” this denial reveals more than it convinces. What is necessary instead is, as we saw with the question of race, to understand the historical and strategic relationship between both sides and the potential to organize for revolutionary change."

"Which brings us to a second and arguably more threatening face of anarchist imperialism. If we have seen that a fidelity to the word anarchist often leads U.S. and European anarchists into closed circuits of occasionally dubious allies, then the flip-side of this is the silencing of many truly revolutionary voices and the erasure of radical antistate practices. The best example of this in contemporary Venezuela is the “Tupamaro” phenomenon. Put in the briefest possible terms, the Tupamaros are revolutionary neighborhood organizations and militias which simultaneously seek the radicalization of the Bolivarian Revolution and the assertion of local power and self-defense. Their view is one in which the state as it exists will be fundamentally dismantled, and yet their voices are rarely recognized by anarchists in Venezuela or elsewhere, and this is because of their seemingly paradoxical relationship to the state and Chávez. As the leader of one such militia group, La Piedrita, explained to me: ferocious autonomy notwithstanding, he considers Chávez the “maximum leader” of the process and “the only one who can prevent a civil war in Venezuela.” But this is in reality no paradox: it is the expression of a strategic understanding of the path the struggle in Venezuela is taking, one which entails that revolutionary organizations offer their support (to quote Chávez’s own historic words against him) “for now"."

"Thus the danger of what I call “anarchist imperialism” is one which is intimately connected with fidelity to anarchism as identity rather than as a series of practices which undermine and attack the state as a structure of inequality. In privileging nominally “anarchist” voices and erasing others, this approach can lead us to miss the antistate forest for the anarchist trees."

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Feb 23 2014 14:20

And this one: “Open Horizons”: An Interview with Roland Denis

“The problem in Venezuela is not a lack of organization. Rather it is how we organize ourselves to struggle against the cooptation of power by the leadership, which is corrupt, bureaucratic, and useless.”

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Feb 23 2014 15:24
Drakula25 wrote:
You're comparing Maduro to Stalin? Is thst to make Maduro sound bad or Stalin sound non-genocidal?

While it is unwise to compare Maduro to Stalin or any other genocidal tyrant, the fact remains that there is nothing new about anarchists or libertarin socialists being slated for criticising leftist or so called progressive governments. Likewise, the wilingness of leftists to leap to the defence of whatever left capitalist regime is nothing new. Same goes for labelling anarchists as 'incoherent'.

S. Artesian
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Feb 23 2014 17:30

Maduro is deflinitely the titular head of a "left" capitalist regime, but that doesn't mean the mobilization against the government is anything other than counter-revolutionary, or let's say preemptively counterrevolutionary, as the economy (remember that?) can no longer support the luxury of being "left" and "capitalist" at the same time.

The demonstrations are similar to 2002, with the "right" unleashing gunfire during demonstrations and then blaming the Chavez supporters, and the police.

Doesn't mean we support Maduro, or any left capitalist government, we do not-- but we do support, and organize for workers, in cities and rural areas where goons and thugs have operated against the poor for years, to mobilize against counterrevolution and the origins of counterrevolution by separating the bourgeoisie from their property, liberty, and pursuit of happiness.

S. Artesian
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Feb 23 2014 17:47

teh wrote:

Quote:
his is Western propaganda. The Venezuelan economy is exactly where it was when Chavez was first elected in 1998: a poor, high inflation, oil dependent (shipping chiefly to it's imperialist master USA) neoliberal economy.

Well yes and no. Not exactly where it was. Life expectancy as a whole has improved to a point that is the longest or near the longest for any country in Latin America. GDP was growing rapidly through 2007 (yes, oil dependency), and GDP per capita adjusted for inflation is still 25% above what it was in 2004, despite the years of negative/slow growth since then. Infant mortality (under 1 year of age), child mortality (under 5 years of age) and prevalence of child malnutrition have declined since 2004.

Still the "economics" of Chavez, and Maduro, have been little different than the old "sowing the petroleum" ideology of every Venezuelan leader of the past 90 years-- Chavez actually did it-- but with results destined to be undone sooner or later as the worsening economy made for stronger discontent.

Now is the sooner and the later for the bourgeoisie.

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Feb 24 2014 00:54

Funny response by a leftist:

Andre Vltdhek wrote:
I am not a Venezuelan citizen. I wish I could be, but I am not. But I have fought for Venezuela, in my own way, through my reports and speeches, through films and in my books. I fought ever since Hugo Chavez became the President, ‘my President’.

And I am proud that I fought. And now, when Venezuela is once again under vicious attack, I want to stand firmly by her side, by the side of her Revolution, by the side of El Processo, and of her great Presidents – both Chavez and Maduro!

And I want to say this, and I will say this loudly, carajo: I don’t care what passport is hanging from my pocket, but Caracas is now my capital, and Caracas is what we are going to defend, if we have to. Because in Caracas, we will be fighting for Havana, for Harare and Johannesburg, for Cairo and Calcutta, for the tiny atoll nations in the Pacific Ocean, for Hanoi, for Beijing, and even for Moscow, Asmara, La Paz, Valparaiso, Quito, Managua and for so many of the other independent, freedom-loving places of this wonderful world.

The violent activities undertaken by those so-called ‘protesters’ in Caracas have to be stopped, immediately, and if necessary, by force.

‘The opposition’ has been paid from abroad, as it has been paid, in the past and now, in China, in Eastern Europe, in Syria, Ukraine and in Thailand, as it has been paid everywhere else in the world, where the West could not manage to easily strip those ‘rebellious’ countries of all their riches, while keeping them humiliated, and on their knees.

I'm not defending the oppositions in any of these countries and their outlook (I'm not too up-to-date in many of these cases), but some of these leftists actually believe only people in the west have a reason to resist but not those living under other 'non-western' capitalist states. Apparently, Chinese capitalism is so glorious only people under the control of external, conspiratorial forces can end up protesting in the streets.

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Feb 24 2014 00:54

dp

Drakula25
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Feb 25 2014 14:23
Serge Forward wrote:
Drakula25 wrote:
You're comparing Maduro to Stalin? Is thst to make Maduro sound bad or Stalin sound non-genocidal?

While it is unwise to compare Maduro to Stalin or any other genocidal tyrant, the fact remains that there is nothing new about anarchists or libertarin socialists being slated for criticising leftist or so called progressive governments. Likewise, the wilingness of leftists to leap to the defence of whatever left capitalist regime is nothing new. Same goes for labelling anarchists as 'incoherent'.

Fair enough.

Drakula25
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Feb 25 2014 14:24
Agent of the Fifth International wrote:
Funny response by a leftist:

Andre Vltdhek wrote:
I am not a Venezuelan citizen. I wish I could be, but I am not. But I have fought for Venezuela, in my own way, through my reports and speeches, through films and in my books. I fought ever since Hugo Chavez became the President, ‘my President’.

And I am proud that I fought. And now, when Venezuela is once again under vicious attack, I want to stand firmly by her side, by the side of her Revolution, by the side of El Processo, and of her great Presidents – both Chavez and Maduro!

And I want to say this, and I will say this loudly, carajo: I don’t care what passport is hanging from my pocket, but Caracas is now my capital, and Caracas is what we are going to defend, if we have to. Because in Caracas, we will be fighting for Havana, for Harare and Johannesburg, for Cairo and Calcutta, for the tiny atoll nations in the Pacific Ocean, for Hanoi, for Beijing, and even for Moscow, Asmara, La Paz, Valparaiso, Quito, Managua and for so many of the other independent, freedom-loving places of this wonderful world.

The violent activities undertaken by those so-called ‘protesters’ in Caracas have to be stopped, immediately, and if necessary, by force.

‘The opposition’ has been paid from abroad, as it has been paid, in the past and now, in China, in Eastern Europe, in Syria, Ukraine and in Thailand, as it has been paid everywhere else in the world, where the West could not manage to easily strip those ‘rebellious’ countries of all their riches, while keeping them humiliated, and on their knees.

I'm not defending the oppositions in any of these countries and their outlook (I'm not too up-to-date in many of these cases), but some of these leftists actually believe only people in the west have a reason to resist but not those living under other 'non-western' capitalist states. Apparently, Chinese capitalism is so glorious only people under the control of external, conspiratorial forces can end up protesting in the streets.

You'll love this guy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVK7BC3uiq4

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Feb 26 2014 02:04
Drakula25 wrote:
Agent of the Fifth International wrote:
Funny response by a leftist:

Andre Vltdhek wrote:
I am not a Venezuelan citizen. I wish I could be, but I am not. But I have fought for Venezuela, in my own way, through my reports and speeches, through films and in my books. I fought ever since Hugo Chavez became the President, ‘my President’.

And I am proud that I fought. And now, when Venezuela is once again under vicious attack, I want to stand firmly by her side, by the side of her Revolution, by the side of El Processo, and of her great Presidents – both Chavez and Maduro!

And I want to say this, and I will say this loudly, carajo: I don’t care what passport is hanging from my pocket, but Caracas is now my capital, and Caracas is what we are going to defend, if we have to. Because in Caracas, we will be fighting for Havana, for Harare and Johannesburg, for Cairo and Calcutta, for the tiny atoll nations in the Pacific Ocean, for Hanoi, for Beijing, and even for Moscow, Asmara, La Paz, Valparaiso, Quito, Managua and for so many of the other independent, freedom-loving places of this wonderful world.

The violent activities undertaken by those so-called ‘protesters’ in Caracas have to be stopped, immediately, and if necessary, by force.

‘The opposition’ has been paid from abroad, as it has been paid, in the past and now, in China, in Eastern Europe, in Syria, Ukraine and in Thailand, as it has been paid everywhere else in the world, where the West could not manage to easily strip those ‘rebellious’ countries of all their riches, while keeping them humiliated, and on their knees.

I'm not defending the oppositions in any of these countries and their outlook (I'm not too up-to-date in many of these cases), but some of these leftists actually believe only people in the west have a reason to resist but not those living under other 'non-western' capitalist states. Apparently, Chinese capitalism is so glorious only people under the control of external, conspiratorial forces can end up protesting in the streets.

You'll love this guy:

See: http://libcom.org/forums/general/how-post-youtube-videos-101-31082013

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laborbund
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Feb 26 2014 02:56

I once carried on a very public feud with Caleb while a friend of mine was his roommate. It was really awkward. I saw him at a Stauaghton Lynd talk and walked up to say hello to him to make it more awkward. Im mostly glad he doesnt live in my town anymore but sometimes I miss encountering him at various liberal left things going on about North Korea.

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Soapy
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Feb 26 2014 04:18

can't stop laughing at the "hands off DPRK" bit

(although now I've started thinking about how horrible it must be to actually live in DPRK...the laughs have stopped)

HOPE THE LIBCOPS DON'T COME IN HERE TELLING ME STOP DERAILING TEH THREAD

but if they do ima say, "it's pretty clear that the bosses are really upset with Soapy"

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Alf
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Feb 28 2014 16:14

statement by the ICC's section in Venezuela, unfortunately not translated yet, and a leaflet from a sympathiser denouncing the repression of the demonstrators by the Chavist regime. Offers to translate gratefully received.

http://es.internationalism.org/ccionline/201402/3996/la-indignacion-se-m...

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cresspot
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Mar 11 2014 00:01


Apparently supermarkets are using the protests to advertise scarce goods