Lesvos and Chios: volunteers helping refugees arrested by police and Frontex, involvement of the International Rescue Committee

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Mark.
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Feb 26 2016 01:24

Europe braces for major 'humanitarian crisis' in Greece after row over refugees

Two refugees try to hang themselves in Plateia Victorias --- edit: report here

In Athens, thousands of Afghan refugees are living in public parks as their path north is blocked

Radio interview with a volunteer back from Lesvos

Ferries taking refugees from the islands halted until port at Piraeus is cleared

Thousands of refugees are stuck at Piraeus with nowhere to go. Kammenos has announced that five new camps are being set up, I think all at former army camps. Many refugees in northern Greece have set out walking towards Idomeni along the main roads.

MSF Sea wrote:
Greek media are reporting that camps for 20,000 #people will be built in northern #Greece before the EU-Turkey summit on March 7.
Andrew Connelly wrote:

There are multiple exoduses of #refugees all across #Greece heading to a border that is barely open twitter.com/tempodiaframma

#Greece #Macedonia border getting bad fast. Driving out of #Idomeni, the road to the highway full of hundreds of #refugees walking, sleeping

Asteris Masouras wrote:

Call for aid to infants at #Diavata by @eleannioannidou facebook.com/eleanna.ioannidou "army & UNHCR didn't provide for their nutritional needs"

@asteris @eleannioannidou I wouldn't really expect the army to be supplied to take care of babies, but you'd think the UNHCR would.

@warmwelcomeeu I'm sure not gonna pull any punches on these things, things are dire. Eleanna's a friend & veteran activist, I trust her word

@asteris Oh I believe it, I'm just griping about UNHCR.
P.S.: docs.google.com/spreadsheets

@warmwelcomeeu I'll be griping about it a lot too, if this keeps up. More army/UNHCR-operated camps will be opening up in coming days

Mark.
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Feb 26 2016 11:26
Daphne Tolis wrote:

Greek Shipping Min. announced plan to slow down transfer of refugees from the islands by suspending ferry services from Lesbos, Chios&Samos.

Ferries in Lesbos, Chios & Samos will house registered #refugees from today until Sunday and will then resume services, acc to the minister.

Andrew Connelly wrote:

Yesterday UNHCR say #Macedonia let 107 #refugees enter. There must be over 4000 here and rising #Idomeni

At #Greece/#Macedonia border many fled #Syria v.recently. Fleeing: shelling by #Turkey in Afrin, #Russia/Assad in Aleppo, ISIS in Raqqa...

BREAKING: #Slovenia, #Croatia announce entry limit of 500 #refugees per day, according to #Serbia interior minister

My latest @AJEnglish report with @zolinphoto from the #Greece #Macedonia border on the plight of banished Afghans http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2016/02/europe-closing-borders-afghans-160225151702251.html

Mark.
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Feb 26 2016 11:54

Report from yesterday

Live Ticker Eidomeni wrote:

The situation in northern Greece has changed in an almost unprecedented way. According to MSF, 12 000 refugees are currently stuck in Greece. They want to travel on and their immediate goal is to be as close to the border as possible. Today has shown, that the Greek government’s strategy to split up groups of refugees and lock them up in different camps along the way does not work. In northern Greece, thousands have started to walk towards the border: that is, Idomeni. The whole region seems to be on the move.

Hundreds stuck in the newly inaugurated former military camp in Diavata near Thessaloniki broke the fence today and started to walk towards Idomeni (70km). The camp in Diavata is completely closed off by police and military. No NGOs, no media and of course, no independent people were allowed to enter the camp. Also, no one was allowed to exit. However, the refugees could not be restrained by police, military and fences. They forged a way out and moved on, northbound.

In the meantime, those stuck at the Polykastro gas station decided to walk to Idomeni as well. Around 800 people were on the highway towards Idomeni this afternoon. There were further unconfirmed reports about other spots along the way, where people decided to walk.

Meanwhile, the camp in Idomeni is overcrowded. According to the UNHCR statistics of today, no one has been able to cross from Macedonia onwards. Macedonia, in accordance with the other Balkan route northern states and Austria, have declared mores thorough identity checks. This will mean further slowing of the registration processes and travelling speed of the refugees.

Whilst the camp in Idomeni remains overcrowded, protests and escalations can be expected there in the coming days. And as the recent developments have shown, thousands more can be expected to continue their journey onwards on foot along the highway towards Idomeni. The sight of hundreds walking along the highway are impressive and evoke the images of Keleti, Hungary in September 2015. They show the will of the refugees to reach the border and travel on. Once more, the different governments have made their plans without considering the agency and determination of the people on the move.

We have decided to change the format of our liveticker, in order to better accommodate the fast-pace changes happening simultaneously in many different locations in northern Greece. The several newly opened spots where people will be held back in the region around Thessaloniki as well as the highway from Athens now widen the geographical range from where people are setting off on foot, revolting and protesting. From now on, we will write one update per day in the evening, which will summarize the different events that occurred during the day between Thessalonki and the border in Idomeni. Short updates can be found during the day on our Twitter account: https://twitter.com/MovingEurope

Mark.
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Feb 29 2016 11:02

Benjamin Julian reports from Kastellorizo

Welcome to Greece (but not to Europe) --- edit: a comment on this

Mark.
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Feb 26 2016 21:00
Live Ticker Eidomeni wrote:

26.02.2016

The situation in Greece is further intensifying. Today again, people started to walk from Polykastro, Diavata and even further south towards Idomeni.

This morning the last ferry arrived from Lesvos before the temporary stop of transport from the islands to Piraeus port. The Greek authorities announced that ferries will be held back on the islands and used as temporary accommodation. Apart from the overcrowded camps close to the port there are also several hundred people accommodated in the ferry terminals of Piraeus. The people have been there for up to 3 days, staying on cardboard in the terminal halls.

Around 150 people started a sit-in protest at the entrance of the port, demanding on a banner „We want to go out of Greece“.

Meanwhile, the Slovenian authorities have announced to limit the daily influx of people to only 580 per day. The countries south on the Balkan corridor are expected to follow. With only 168 people passing to Macedonia/FYROM yesterday, according to the UNHCR statistics, the bottleneck in Idomeni is not expected to clear up soon.

With heavy rain this evening, the situation in the overcrowded and muddy camp in Idomeni, where many go without tents, is becoming worse. Rising tensions among the people who have been stuck in the camp now for days can be expected.

Mark.
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Feb 28 2016 10:46
Marianna Karakoulaki wrote:
Two former military camps that were supposed to become #RefugeesGR hotspots on fire in northern Greece. Rumours that fascists burnt them.

Report in Greek

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Feb 28 2016 17:22

Los Muros de Europa - Spanish produced documentary about the refugee crisis on Lesvos. It includes some interviews in Spanish but a lot of it is in English

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Feb 29 2016 11:21

Yesterday

Live Ticker Eidomeni wrote:

28.2.2016

This morning, another big protest took place in Idomeni. Around 400 people blocked the train tracks during the entire day, keeping cargo trains from crossing the border. The police intended to blackmail the protesters by stating that they would open the border if they left the train tracks. However, for the protesters it was clear: “They are lying to us! They say that the border will open, but nobody passed today and yesterday only 50 people passed. They are lying to us!”

The situation is getting tenser; people are questioning whether they will ever be able to pass this border. Many have figured out that the small number of people passing is a strategy of the authorities: “They only let some people pass to keep our hopes up, to keep us waiting calmly.”

There have been new camps opening in the surrounding area of Polykastro, where reportedly the few remaining people from the gas station in Polykastro have been taken. However, it has also been reported that these camps are not really ready to accommodate the said 2000 people. Whether the authorities’ containment strategy works with this camp remains to be seen. Possibly, many will make their way to the border in the next days anyways.

Meanwhile, the camp in Idomeni is extending steadily across the surrounding fields. More people keep arriving, on foot and with taxis. All day long there has been a steady trickle of new people, packed with their heavy bags, blankets and small children in their arms. They try to find their way around the already overcrowded camp, hoping to find a tent and a spot to set it up. The number of people exceeds the camp capacity by at least a fourfold. It is only a matter of time until the daily protests become no longer appeasable.

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Today

Marianna Karakoulaki wrote:

More than 8000 #refugeesGR in the camp today. #Idomeni
....
Police blockade just broke 1000s #refugeesgr head to the border to protest. Calm at the moment

Chaos at the the border. #refugeesGR to break the fence! They want safe passage - some have been trapped for days

Macedonian police/army have placed barricades as fenced door opened for a bit. 1000s in front of the fence. Train line closed.

Macedonian police just teargassed us. NOT on the air - directly to #refugeesGr !!! Loads of children teargassed !

MSF Sea wrote:

BREAKING: The #FYROM authorities have just used tear gas on the protesting #people waiting to cross the border which includes many children.

UPDATE: The @MSF medical teams in #Idomeni are treating child after child for exposure to tear gas.

Mark.
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Feb 29 2016 18:33

Update from Life on the ground in Lesvos

Mark.
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Feb 29 2016 20:44
Damomac wrote:
Greece's migration minister says TV and journalists will not be given access to refugee centres until further notice
Teacher Dude wrote:

Greek government forbids media access to refugee camps on order of #SYRIZA minister
....
Now at meeting. Volunteer groups from Thessaloniki coordinating efforts to help #refugees in city and #Idomeni These guys get things done.

Lots of groups and individuals want to help at Diavata refugee camp in Thessaloniki, people trying to coordinate efforts

Lots of other refugee camps opening up across northern Greece. Local communities trying to help #refugees

Mark.
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Feb 29 2016 22:34

Marianna Karakoulaki's report from Idomeni

Mark.
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Mar 1 2016 17:49

Kastellorizo - clothes distribution centre burnt down last night

Athens - building occupied at the Polytechnic to house refugee families camped out in Plateia Victorias

Mark.
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Mar 1 2016 18:39
Nick Barnets wrote:

Reports of 10,000 #refugees at #Idomeni now and many heading there on foot today.

A few of the #refugees I met in #Idomeni tell me they've been stranded there for 10 days.

Most are #SyrianRefugees. By what I've observed more than half are women/children.

Daniel Trilling wrote:

Trapping refugees in Greece, as is happening now, may slow the passage of people to north-west Europe, but it's unlikely to stop them coming

A few reasons why: 1. Refugees keep moving until they find somewhere they are confident they can settle - Turkey is not that place.

2. Regardless of the way it's being treated, Greece is still in the EU and many refugees will have an expectation of fairer treatment.

3. "Dublin system" returns to Greece have been suspended since 2011, so if refugees can pass further into EU, they won't be sent back.

4. The Balkan borders will be closed, but this means refugees will go back to using smuggler routes, as they did before summer 2015.

5. Despite much-vaunted negotiations with Turkey, my guess is it's unlikely large numbers of refugees will be sent back there.

(Because a) what's in it for Turkey, b) conditions in Turkey often don't meet EU standards, so the policy could be open to legal challenge)

So, the likely effects are going to be i) humanitarian crisis in Greece ii) refugees taking slower, more expensive, more dangerous journeys

and iii) a containment plan, where people are put into temporary-seeming camps that become large, poorly-run holding centres

This is pretty much what happened in Greece on a smaller scale from 2008-2014. Can't see any political will from the EU to do different now.

Don't know, don't care - how Afghans won't be deterred by Europe's border restrictions

Mark.
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Mar 1 2016 19:52
Asteris Masouras wrote:

The Syriza govt issued a media ban on refugee centers, claiming coordinators asked for it. @UNHCRGreece & the army? http://apne.ws/1OIqifP
....
True, but I'm also wondering if UNHCR requested the media ban at refugee reception centers https://twitter.com/KatalystProds/status/704744068857929729

@asteris any reason you wonder this?

@keeptalkingGR govt claims coordinators asked for it … army & UNHCR are coordinating response at the camps

@asteris i see. i thought it was rather the army

@keeptalkingGR I bet the army would prefer to permanently ban the media. Also, read this https://twitter.com/northaura/status/704404044060688384
....
"At Piraeus today, coast guard cop demanded I stop filming, while private media are filming unperturbed" https://twitter.com/kinimatini/status/704717207587168256

The media ban only hurts independent reports, the ones actually showing the reality on the ground" https://twitter.com/kinimatini/status/704717734123278336

Volunteers protest abusive mainstream media at refugee centers, state bans media from centers, mainstream media keep filming

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Mar 1 2016 21:17
Benjamin Julian wrote:

The hotspot in Leros is a badly run prison

On Friday, a hotspot was opened in Leros for incoming migrants. What is a hotspot, you might well ask, and there are many possible answers: An identification factory for migrants. A prison. A refugee camp run by the police and military, enclosed in barbed wire. An Empire of Identification. Everyone gets registered here: migrants, workers, NGOs and volunteers. Everything in it is square; the paper forms, the people-containers, the walkways and the wire mesh.

There are three camps already on Leros, with humane staff, proper facilities, varied activities and open doors. This does not suit the border regime of Europe. For months it has demanded of the Greek government, and twisted its arm relentlessly, so that it finally builds hotspots. And now they’re here, in all their horrifying glory. Shining metal, immaculate concrete, white gravel and rows of square boxes for The Anonymous Unidentified to stay in until they get their papers and can finally have an actual verified existence in the merciless eyes of the European Union. Unless they’re of the wrong nationality, in which case they’ll get no papers, except for a ticket back to Wherever. Getting papers takes three days, but nobody knows how long one has to wait for deportation.

On the day the hotspot opened, no volunteer or NGO was alerted. They just got a random call a good while after the first arrivals, saying that baby milk was needed. Volunteers immediately came over, and there the refugees sat, huddled in blankets on the concrete floor of the camp entrance. That is where newcomers are made to wait while, one after the other, the human beings are digitized and fingerprinted, their bodies are transformed into verifiable, printable, transferable identities.

The refugees asked if anyone had brought water. It turned out the army had given them a little to drink in plastic cups, but when a few people threw them on the ground, instead of in the garbage can, the army gave them no more.

Talking with refugees was forbidden. “Find out what they need and go,” the men in uniform said. That is how an camp under the police and military operates. The rules are made on the fly by a man in uniform, habitually on a soaring power-trip, maybe even wearing blue-mirror sunglasses in addition to the uniform to underline his privileged anonymity in this dictatorship of identification. Volunteers that try to help here without having registered risk being interrogated about their purpose and threatened with imprisonment. (This is no idle fantasy, it actually happened.) Western volunteers often feel ashamed about their privileges over refugees. Here, the migrant-hating machine of Europe has finally and accidentally created some twisted sort of equality.

What it has not created is a functioning processing facility. The shivering new arrivals on Friday were not supplied with food or clothes, medicine, information, doctors or legal aid. Nothing. The reception they got was as cold and stark as the concrete they sat on. The military seems to just expect volunteers to do their bidding, to feed and clothe their prisoners.

And so we did.

This is what volunteering has come to. Shipping meals into prisons so that the Greek military doesn’t have to cook them. And it gets worse. The uniformed masters of the camp have told us that we have to collect the garbage as well.

We can’t be codependent like this. Today we clean up the prison and feed the prisoners, because the military can’t be bothered. What will humanitarian work look like tomorrow?

We should have been prepared for this. These hotspots have been planned openly and publicly for months. They’re already being used to horrible effect in Italy, where MSF has withdrawn its cooperation due to “unacceptable conditions”. We should take the same stand here. There is a risk that the state will then starve people for a while, but if we fold and allow these hotspots to just carry on with our assistance, things won’t get any better. These places may look like an excel document come to life, a registration form built of concrete, but they are in reality chaotically and incompetently run arbitrary dictatorships of the least compassionate institutions in society. We can’t do humanitarian work there any more than a kitten can play in a rottweiler cage. Compassionate people will be bullied out or coaxed into complicity. We’re already the crutches of a spiteful, savage institution that has no humanitarian purpose. Let’s draw a line and stop our cooperation.

Mark.
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Mar 1 2016 23:00
NoBorders wrote:

Meanwhile,we forget detained immigrants. Deportations to Turkey from Greece. It's horrible.

308 deportations from #Greece in 2 days for nationality, from detention centers

Refugee Support wrote:

No more registration for Pakistani refugees in GR. Thus impossible to buy ferry ticket, stuck on islands #refugeesGr https://twitter.com/bjokie/status/704321063858130944

Just like refugees from Morocco and Algeria. Question now is if they will be detained as well in detention camps like #Corinth.
....
#Deportation of #refugees from #Corinth detention center started yesterday. Corinth almost empty now.

According to reports only those who were able to register as a refugee on the islands won't be deported.

The registration was closed for Moroccan and Algerian refugees end of last year.

Mark.
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Mar 2 2016 00:35

Greece seeks EU aid for 100,000 refugees

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Mar 2 2016 01:35

Good thread Mark, keep us posted

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Mar 2 2016 06:16

This story is so sad..What's happening??..

Mark.
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Mar 6 2016 22:00

Video - collection for refugees in Syntagma today

Mark.
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Mar 7 2016 18:31

Working class solidarity with refugees and migrants - statement from libertarian student groups

Mark.
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Mar 8 2016 20:59
Samos Refugees wrote:

Stuck on Samos

Over the past month we have spent some time in travelling on planes and in airports. These are places which are far removed from the realities of the refugees we know and meet on Samos. Airports and passenger planes assume and portray a world of freedom to roam. Posters and magazines suggest the world as an open space to explore and enjoy (if you have the money). You will see no warning messages on the bill boards which encourage you to spend time in London, Rome or Paris that only people with the 'right' papers/passports/visas will be allowed to enter. Most of the passengers in these places never question their right to travel freely. It is taken for granted.

But this is a world apart from the realities confronting refugees in places such as Samos. For most of them the world is becoming smaller day by day.

The authorities have been busy in the past month trying, under massive EU pressure and threats, to get the hotspot up and running by a mid February deadline. It is located next to the existing Detention Centre on the hillside above Samos town. If it resembles its neighbour it is set to be another cage. It was of course a ridiculous target: to provide the infrastructure for and build adequate accommodation for up to 2,000 people in a matter of weeks in a ruined country where the authorities are by and large incompetent and on an island whose leaders have, from the beginning, made clear their reluctance to provide anything for refugees. So of course the hotspot is not finished, or at least the buildings are not; the refugees, however, have been moved, and crowded into cabins and two-man tents set on concrete in and around the old detention centre where they are fingerprinted, questioned and processed. At least for Europe this is what probably counts more.

The local elites on the island, both political and economic, have from the beginning made clear that they did not want refugees on Samos; for them, this spelt disaster for an already fragile tourist industry. It was a stupid argument, but was fed by stories of refugees as carriers of disease, thieves, and now of course terrorists. We and others trying to do something over the past year found ourselves constantly obstructed and frustrated, because to provide anything, however minimal, to refugees was argued by some as an encouragement for more to come. They came anyway.

Despite the opposition of the local authorities and elites to the creation of the hotspot, they have little leverage on policies made far beyond their reach in Berlin and Brussels. The hotspot also signifies that the refugees can no longer be seen as a short term inconvenience but something that is now a fixed feature of Samos life. Refugees on Samos is now one of our realities, over which the island has no control and which is determined by its geography and the politics of borders. It is a reality that the island authorities are reluctant to embrace. For them the presence of refugees and the Camps in which they are held deters tourism. It is that simple. These same authorities NEVER comment that it is the deaths in the Aegean – which requires a different sort of solution – which might be the biggest deterrent to tourists; after all who wants to swim in a graveyard, even when it is azure blue? Nobody we know here now looks upon the sea in the same way as they did before.

Incidentally why don't they listen to the restaurant owner in Lampedusa who said that what harmed tourism in his town was not the presence of refugees but the militarised response of the authorities. Tourists can't relax in the bars and eating places with so many uniforms and guns around them.

As far as the Samian authorities are concerned there are only negatives associated with the arrival and presence of refugees. There is never any acknowledgement that the refugees and its associated caravan of NGOs and international volunteers have brought income and jobs to the island, and through the winter too. Restaurants, cafes, supermarkets, hotels and not least taxi drivers amongst others have all benefited significantly from the refugees this winter when there are no tourists on the island. And with the hotspot developments now taking place and additional EU cash to be made available over the next 2 years (700 million euros in total for Greece) we can expect to see job creation at a level on the island not seen since the crisis began six years ago.

In every aspect of the ongoing and ever shifting reactions of the European authorities to the on going flow of refugees to the Greek islands the voices of the refugees is absent. Of course nobody has asked the refugees what they regard as being important in the creation of the new camp. We have no idea now whether Samos is going to be a place where refugees are held for months or just for weeks. But whatever the length, lines of cabins crowded together up a Samos hillside surrounded by barbed wire fences could never be described as welcoming and safe.

Listen to the refugees and you seen realise how having your life on hold and depending entirely on others for everything eats away at your well-being. In particular many of the refugees are rightly angry and upset about the lack of information. This extends to never knowing how long they are going to have to wait to be processed and allowed to move on to other parts of Greece. Many of the younger refugees under 18 who are not traveling with their families, but often with friends of a similar age find themselves being held back without any information as to what is to happen next.

For the north Africans who are detained in the police cells (there are others in the camp, but there are not enough cells to lock up all the Algerians and Moroccans) it is even more agonising. They are told nothing. But the police know that after around 20 to 30 days they will be taken under escort to Athens and then on to a closed detention centre for up to 3 months pending deportation. According to one activist who regularly visits the cells, the police consciously avoid giving any information as it is so depressing that it could lead to disturbances with the detainees. Moreover when any information is given it is often unreliable. So for example last week it was announced that there would be no refugees allowed on the ferries to Athens due to the conditions there. The next day over 400 refugees left on the ferry to Piraeus.

Such has been the story all along: decisions are made, then overturned, ignored or forgotten; the unreliability of information means that confusion and frustration is inevitable. Initially it was announced that the hotspot would be created at the port. But within 6 months its offices, sleeping cabins, showers, and so forth are all being dismantled. In February it was announced that the feeding, clothing and care of the refugees was now – with much publicity and applause- going to be taken over by the Church. An institution which on Samos at least has been conspicuous by its absence in helping refugees. MSF (Doctors Without Borders) who had finally managed to overcome official hostility and reluctance and begun providing one meal a day were told to stop what they were doing. As a consequence MSF announced that given the new arrangement they would cease being a major food provider. But the Church came from Athens, reputedly distributed some bread and tinned tuna and left. It seems that it is not ready! Why and by whom was it decided to replace something working reasonably well with something untested and unprepared? In the end, as on many occasions, it was left for others to provide a solution, in this case the Open Eyes kitchen teams at the port and in the camp, who cook and provide food for free.

Meanwhile, as always, the fall-out of the inadequacy, incompetence and lack of humanity of the official response lands on the refugees themselves. The lack of information and the unreliability of what they are told reinforces the despair of dependency on authorities that don't fundamentally care for them. It's scary. They can't plan for the next hour let alone the next day. They never know when their name is going to be called over the tannoy to come to the office, so they have to hang around. Doing nothing. There is no school. There are no places to sit, have a coffee, a game. There is no bulletin board letting them know the latest news on the border closures. But their sense of being blocked and of having fewer opportunities to travel on is profound as is the awareness that it is going to get worse which makes being stuck on Samos even more intolerable. One of the most common questions we are asked by the newly arriving refugees is what news we have on the borders – what are closed, what restrictions are being applied and so on. Clandestine travel is always going to be possible especially if you are young and male. But now we are seeing more older people and more children. They are the ones who are going to find the routes out of Greece more difficult.

Mark.
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Mar 8 2016 22:28
Live Ticker Eidomeni wrote:

The Balkan Corridor will officially close from midnight on. Slovenia and Serbia announced that they will re-introduce the Schengen regime meaning only people with visas can enter their territory. Consequently, Macedonia will keep its border shut for good. Again, racist and inhuman decisions have been made on fancy conferences tables over the lives of thousands of refugees and migrants. With the definite closure of the corridor, Europe is destroying the hopes of thousands of people. All the amazing people we have met during the last weeks, who have shown an incredible amount of strength and resilience are now facing the walls of re-fortified Europe.

Germany’s decision to suspend family reunifications a few months ago forced so many women to take the perilous journey across the sea with their children by themselves. This decision is the second massive blow for them. Many have their husbands in central Europe who have been desperately waiting for their arrival for months. Their hopes of joining them quickly have just been shattered in the mud of Idomeni, giving way to despair and anger.

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Mar 11 2016 19:31

The Sea Between Us - documentary on the refugee crisis on Lesvos.

Lesbos: Enter the hot spot - short documentary from Ross Domoney and Antonis Vradis

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Mar 11 2016 19:54
Quote:
Who can afford to run will run
But what about those who can't... they will have to stay

Untold Stories, Mark Anthony Myrie

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Mar 11 2016 20:11

Yannis Christodoulou, Evie Papada, Anna Papoutsi & Antonis Vradis - Crisis or Zemblanity? Viewing the ‘Migration Crisis’ through a Greek Lens

See also http://www.transcapes.net

Quote:

About Transcapes

Transcapes is a collective research project using the introduction of hotspots in Greece in order to understand wider transformations in the geopolitical body of Europe itself. Situating ourselves in the island of Lesbos, we examine the key actors on the island - humanitarian, social, political - and their relationship to the Moria hotspot. Broadening our scope, we also look at hot spots introduced across Greece; we read the country a vector of its own contradictions and as the object of political decisions which will inevitably compromise its already weak position within the EU. In the third and largest of our cognitive concentric circles (Lesbos, Greece, the EU), we try to understand the crisis of Europe’s own decision-making and executing mechanisms as a whole.

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Mar 19 2016 17:51
MariennaPW wrote:
Mark, thank you so much for your diligent posting on this thread. Really excellent and vital work. I have poured through every single entry and am half way through writing an article on the subject, while liasing with volunteers on the ground. Will post here once it's published, and would welcome any more info/comment from you or anyone else in the meantime. You can check out some of my work from Greece here:
http://mariennapw.com/category/articles/refugee-crisis/

Here's MariennaPW's article:

Refugee crisis: the EU cracks down on volunteers

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Mar 23 2016 20:52

The Chios hotspot, after the EU-Turkey deal

Samos, day 2 of the EU-Turkey pact: glimpsing the nightmares to come

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Mar 24 2016 11:39
Platanos Refugee Solidarity wrote:
A few time ago the "no border kitchen" that is standing for all that time next to the refugees arriving on the island far away from economic profits and systemic organizing, faced another threat of evacuation from the police. More specific, after the demand of the police to the solidarity people there for ahowing their id's, something that tbey denied, they informed them that they will return with more forces to evacuate the camp. There is needed people immediately at the beach of tsamakia to resist massively to that threat.
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Joined: 14-01-04
Mar 24 2016 12:04

Mark, thanks for keeping this thread going. The stream of news and info you're supplying is much appreciated.