The Tunisia effect: where next?

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Tojiah
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Jul 25 2011 20:15
Samotnaf wrote:
The attitude of the cops here seems strangely contradictory: though these anarchists were held in custody longer, they've only been banned from the tent cities for 7 days, as opposed to 30 days for the others. Anybody have any idea why?

I speculate that it's basically the results of haggling. Those who caved in earlier found themselves under worse restrictions than those who were willing to spend the night in jail and see what kind of demand would hold up in front of a judge. Since these were AAW members, the police could still find a way of convincing a judge to put some restriction on them, but not as much as they initially demanded from the rest.

Samotnaf
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Jul 25 2011 20:30

Well, that clarifies it. Thanks.

Mark.
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Jul 25 2011 22:55
Tojiah wrote:
Tunisia effect? I don't know. Sure does seem to be acting up over there, though.

Puerta del Ha’bima: The Spanish revolution reaches Israel

Quote:
The people were ecstatic. The energy was left. The air – and the crowds – were hot. It was one of the most uplifting demonstrations I’ve ever participated in. And, it was quite clear: it could never happen here in Israel.

Five weeks ago in Madrid, my vacation there happened to run into one of those demonstrations. So powerful, energetic and passionate, one simply couldn’t walk away. Only one thought, though, clouded the spirit: the sense of how demonstrations in Israel are so different, so dispirited. How long will it take, if ever, for something like that to happen here?

Well, it took five weeks.

Yes, the messages on the signs echoed each other: from “politica economica al servicio del pueblo, no al del mercado” (“economic policy to serve the people, not the market”) to the Hebrew “anashim li’fney re’vahim” (“people before profits”), from “urgencia social” five weeks ago to Saturday’s “state of emergency” – and, for a change, not in the usual Israeli sense of security emergency, as is legally declared here for decades on. But what echoed was much deeper than the words, it was the passion, the energy. Not just the lyrics, but the music itself.

I do not know where the recent demonstration will lead to. It was spectacular, but left many questions lingering. There was not a single mention of the occupation, nor a single non-Jewish speaker. Seeing as how so much of the socioeconomic gaps are concentrated among Arab citizens: from health services to housing, from education to employment, from infrastructure to social services, these issues should be dealt with. If the leaders of Saturday’s rally are true to their stated vision, they will have to show how sincerely everyone is part of their future of dignity, equality and social justice.

And yet, now, the lyrics of the rally remain strong: protest is the basis for hope; we desire a future that will not only support basic living, but also the possibility of writing poetry; to dream. I listened to the lyrics, and heard the music, and smiled.

The coverage in the Spanish press is also playing up the comparison between the Israeli protests and the plaza occupations in Spain (try googling Israel + indignados)

------

200 housing protesters block road opposite Netanyahu's residence in Jerusalem

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Tojiah
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Jul 26 2011 00:51

Sorry I don't really post much up here. You cover what I would have been uploading, and the rest is in Hebrew and doesn't seem to add much.

Mark.
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Jul 26 2011 09:31

Tojiah - that's fair enough

------

A new thread has been started on the Israeli protests here

Samotnaf
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Aug 2 2011 03:11

I tend to use this thread as a catch-all for interesting events that are not really worth starting a new thread over:

Quote:
Niger police intervene after demonstrations
August 2 2011 at 12:25am
Niamey - Security forces broke up demonstrations by hundreds of people after weeks of electricity cuts in Niger, with several protesters wounded and arrested on Monday, radio reports and police said.
Police fired teargas to disperse demonstrators who took to the streets of the central town of Tanout after a first day of protests on Sunday, private Anfani radio said.
Several people were hurt and about 20 were detained over both days, it said.
Demonstrators vandalised the premises of electricity provider Nigelec as well as the home of its main representative, a policeman told reporters by telephone.
“To demand the release of some of their friends detained on Sunday during a similar demonstration, the residents again took to the streets of Tanout on Monday,” he said.
A Nigelec official said on Anfani radio that the crowd had “badly beaten” another employee.
The impoverished country, much of it in the Sahara desert, regularly suffers power outages.
Since April the capital Niamey has suffered several long electricity cuts that Nigelec mostly blames on disruptions in Nigeria, which provides about 80 percent of Niger's power supply. - Sapa-AFP

http://www.iol.co.za/news/africa/niger-police-intervene-after-demonstrations-1.1109948

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Aug 12 2011 17:38

http://www.leftcom.org/en/articles/2011-08-10/the-unfinished-business-of-the-arab-spring

Samotnaf
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Aug 13 2011 05:35

Bahrain:

Quote:
Police Injured During Demonstrations in Manama
MANAMA, Bahrain, Aug. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The General Director of Bahrain's Capital Governorate Police announced Thursday night that eight members of the security forces were injured after attempting to control demonstrators that vandalized public property and created roadblocks in Bahrain.
One policeman sustained a serious head injury and seven others were treated for minor injuries. Security forces warned protesters that acts of vandalism and disturbing the peace would not be tolerated.
Freedom of expression and opinion are guaranteed by Bahrain's constitution. Peaceful gatherings are allowed for those that seek appropriate authorization to demonstrate or gather publicly. Protests Thursday night in Manama lacked the proper permits.
Security forces in Bahrain follow strict protocol to avoid physical contact with protesters.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/police-injured-during-demonstrations-in-manama-127577738.html

(doesn't even attempt to say what the demo was about)

Mark.
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Nov 18 2011 12:04

#Kuwait: Occupy Parliament

Kuwait: Protesters storm the National Assembly

Kuwait security crackdown after crowd storms parliament

http://twitter.com/#!/search/%23Kuwait?q=%23Kuwait

Mark.
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Feb 17 2012 12:26
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Morocco: A January of revolt and repression for the new government

The struggles of the Moroccan people have continued with force during the month of January. Labour struggles, peasant struggles, the unemployed, the Amazigh [Berber] movement, the struggle in support of political prisoners and against the impunity of the dictatorship, all over Morocco, people are expressing their unease over the situation and the need for profound, real change. The February 20 Movement is demonstrating in the streets and preparing the first anniversary.

What follows is a short overview of some of the struggles...

http://www.anarkismo.net/article/21982

Mark.
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Feb 20 2012 11:40

Thousands gather for Morocco anniversary protests

Mark.
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Feb 25 2012 11:24

Videos from Morocco

Mark.
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Jun 23 2012 22:02

Sudan protests

http://www.urban75.net/forums/threads/revolution-in-sudan-starts.295218/

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/06/22/sudanrevolts-in-wake-of-austerity-anger/

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/06/22/sudan-netizens-verify-internet-blackout-rumours/

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/06/23/sudan-police-denies-use-of-bullets-all-injuries-are-imaginary/

http://crowdvoice.org/sudan-protests

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2012/06/2012622222342156.html

AJE wrote:

Anti-austerity protests in Sudan have entered its sixth day amid reported crackdown on Sudanese and foreign journalists.

Riot police have fired tear gas and civilians armed with machetes and swords attacked protesters during demonstrations sweeping Khartoum to demand the resignation of Omar al-Bashir, the Sudanese president, a Sudanese opposition leader said on Thursday.

The protests are in response to austerity measures that will cut government jobs and raise fuel prices.

Saata Ahmed al-Haj, head of the opposition Sudanese Commission for Defense of Freedoms and Rights, said hundreds of protesters have been detained over the past five days.

He said they were later released but were badly mistreated.

Al-Haj said security forces shaved off the protesters' hair, stripped them naked, flogged them and then left them outside in the scorching sun for hours.
[…]
The demonstrations started on Saturday night at the University of Khartoum. Students protesting transportation fare hikes took to the streets outside the downtown campus, where security forces fired tear gas and rounded up dozens of them.

Since then, Khartoum has been the scene of daily protests, spilling out to different of the capital.

Echoing calls heard in Arab Spring uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria, protesters chanted, "The people demand to bring down the regime."
[…]

AJE Inside Story on the protests, though tbh the talking heads discussion part of this doesn't help much in understanding what's going on and features a hopeless regime apologist:

Mark.
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Jun 24 2012 11:35
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Jun 24 2012 14:27

I'm not sure of its political stance but Sahel Blog has some coverage of the Sudan protests - mostly links to other media but I've found it interesting.

Mark.
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Jun 25 2012 12:05

Global Voices: Unshackling the Sudanese revolution

The Girifna blog has more reports: http://www.girifna.com/blog-girifna/

Mark.
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Jun 25 2012 23:45

Reuters: Sudan says no retreat on cuts despite protests

Quote:

Sudanese police used teargas to disperse the latest demonstration which took place in an impoverished eastern region, where witnesses said protesters also set fire to a local office of the ruling party.
[…]
about 200 protesters gathered in the eastern town of Gedaref, near the border with Eritrea, chanting "No, no to high prices" and "the people want to overthrow the regime", witnesses and activists said.

Protesters later set fire to a local office of the ruling National Congress Party (NCP), burning part of it before fire trucks put out the blaze, witnesses told Reuters.
[…]
The most widespread protests so far broke out on Friday in neighborhoods across Khartoum, expanding beyond the core of student activists who had dominated them.
[…]
The capital has been relatively quiet since a security crackdown on Saturday, but activists have continued to try to use discontent to build a broader "Arab Spring"-style movement against Bashir's 23-year rule.

Later on Monday, more than 100 supporters of the opposition Popular Congress Party burned tires and blocked a road after a meeting in Khartoum. They threw rocks at the police, who threw rocks back and then fired teargas, a Reuters witness said.

Late on Sunday, police used batons and teargas to break up a protest in the al-Jerief area in eastern Khartoum after demonstrators blocked a road and burned tires, witnesses said.

Mark.
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Jun 25 2012 23:57

Girifna: Sudan revolts - a situation analysis

Yousif Mubarak and Sarah Al Hassan wrote:

June 20, 2012 (Khartoum)
The last four days bore witness to continuous anti-regime protests in Sudan.

The struggles of the Sudanese people are well documented: oppressed by a totalitarian regime, bereft of basic rights, and plagued with poverty; the Sudanese have protested since the onset of the Arab Spring. Protests, which started on January 30, 2011, and have continued over the last year and a half, have not been sustained largely due to the uncertainty surrounding the separation of South Sudan, as well as poor organization and ruthless government crackdowns.

This latest wave of protests, however, feels different. Motivated by economic shocks, protestors, youth and university students, are vowing to continue until the regime is toppled, even in the face of brutal resistance by security forces. A mass protest to do just that (and announced mostly on Facebook) has been planned for June 30, 2012, the 23rd anniversary of the National Congress Party’s (NCP) rise to power. Grappling with an annual inflation rate that reached 30.4 percent as of May 2012, the Sudanese can wait no longer. 

The latest round of protest began on the evening of June 16, 2012, when female residents at the University of Khartoum staged an impromptu demonstration in opposition to increased meal and transportation prices. A week earlier the Khartoum State Governor had increased transport prices by 35 percent.

The male students quickly joined forces and together they moved the protest off-campus, marching up to Jamhuriya Street where they were met by police forces. After dispersing the protest, the police raided the university dorms, beating and harassing female occupants. News of these events spread across the University the following morning, sparking a university-wide protest in solidarity. This demonstration was similarly quelled, with the police raiding and for a short time invading the main campus and dormitories.

Since then, protests have continued without end. Today (June 20, 2012), the University of Khartoum entered its fifth day of demonstrations, across its three branches in the Khartoum tri-state area. Over these five days, the revolt has spread to other universities, notably the Southern wing of the University of Sudan, Al-Ahliya University in Omdurman, and Bahri (previously Juba) University in Khartoum North. As well as several universities outside of Khartoum State including in Shendi, Obeid and Gezira. In all these protests, loyalist NCP students joined with the security forces and assaulting protesters with metal rods, machetes, knives, and even swords.

Locals have now joined the revolt, spurred by the student uprising, fueled by economic hardship, and provoked by the government’s ‘fiscal austerity’ program. The program, which was announced on Monday June 18, 2012 by President Omar al Bashir, includes a 60 percent and 40 percent increase in the respective prices of fuel and sugar and yet another tax hike. Protests by locals have taken place over the last few days in several of Khartoum’s districts including AlKalakla (AlQubba), Kober, Burri, Riyad, Al-Manshiya and in Omdurman, where on Monday huge protests erupted in the main market. Merchants and locals unwavering in their chants of “till when will we live in debt” were met by the sourest police brutality and mass arrests to date.

Today, protests markedly intensified encompassing more universities – AlTighana, Western wing of University of Sudan, the Higher Banking Institute and Blue Nile University; as well as major streets in Khartoum – AlAarda, AlArbaeen, Mak Nimir, Jamhuriya. Othman Digna and Atbara; and districts – AlThawra and Soba.

Many have debated Sudan’s perceived reluctance to join the Arab Spring, particularly since the country’s situation has arguably been the most conducive to a revolution. Many theories have been proposed and range from hopelessness and helplessness to disillusionment with the country’s weak opposition.

In reality, the Sudanese people are resilient; continuous hardships and difficult experiences have given them the ability to endure, and their strong social fabric equips them to absorb more than most. As history has shown, when they decide that “enough is enough” then it overwhelmingly is; and it seems that decision has now been made.

The country’s economic condition, which has made for a dismal standard of living, has been the primary breaking point. The majority of Sudanese will not willingly continue subsidizing a regime that has plundered 60 billion US dollars in oil revenue during the current self-inflicted fiscal crisis. They are unwilling to make sacrifices while the government uses exorbitant taxation and fees to finance ethnically and racially motivated civil wars at the cost of 4 million US dollars per day.

The government’s now defaulted 2012 budget included 82 percent spending on the security and political sectors, while 49 percent of total cross sector expenditures went to public wages and salaries, of which 88 percent was for these two sectors alone. The agricultural sector, which is the main source of livelihood for 80 percent of the population, received just 3 percent of the total expenditure with health and education respectively receiving 2.4 percent and 2.3 percent.

Even the beleaguered opposition, weakened by two decades of suppression and fragmentation, has started to come around. Tonight, a political rally is to be held by opposition forces at the headquarters of the National Umma Party, and will be followed by a demonstration. Regardless of their weaknesses, the mobilization of these political forces and their followers will help bring ordinary citizens to the ongoing youth protests and help generate more momentum and energy for continuing the demonstrations.

It is uplifting to note that the momentum gained so far has continued despite the media blackout on Sudan’s revolt. The government has censored local coverage of protests and has detained all journalists attempting to report on the demonstrations, including AFP’s resident correspondent, Simon Martelli, who was arrested outside the University of Khartoum on Tuesday.

The international media has also been slow to cover the recent wave of protests. As a result, many members of the youth movements believe the international media harbors a pro-Government stance. One prominent news station, in particular, has drawn staunch criticism for its perceived lack of integrity, as it gives extreme focus to events taking place in some countries, while completely developments emerging in other states.

The Sudanese have, however, soldiered on, using social media to communicate and document events. As one blogger proclaimed, “Dear Media, just as we’ll uproot the tyrants ourselves we’ll report it ourselves”.  Indeed, Sudan is home to both the first and second Arab Springs in 1964 and 1985, achieved long before revolutions, like these, were televised.

The force used by the security apparatus (and loyalist students) to quell this latest round of dissent has been excessive even by the regime’s brutal standards, revealing its fears about the significance and potential of these demonstrations. Around 40 prominent youth activists, including representatives of the GIRIFNA movement were arrested on Monday at an aborted meeting at the headquarters of the Haq Party on Monday.  Tear gas fired at congregations has become increasingly toxic causing asthma attacks and nosebleeds, with many hospitalized. Reports have surfaced that the government recently commissioned mass procurement of this new type of tear gas from Russia.

The government’s armed retaliation has served not only to disperse but also to injure, and has specifically targeted women. So far, there has been at least one report of live ammunition fired in the vicinity of protestors. Security forces are arresting anyone within sight of the protest. Photographs of released detainees can be found on social media websites showing marks and bruises as well as shaved eyebrows and heads – all tactics of derision and ridicule. The systematic targeting by security forces has intensified, with the arrest of prominent activists Naglaa Sidahmed and Mohamed Boushi Alim from their homes this morning. 

Developments during the coming days will determine whether this is indeed a revolution as many hope, or just another set of protests similar to ones Sudan has witnessed over the last 18 months. While the University of Khartoum and the student population have been the heartbeat of this current mobilization, the protests have now spread to markets, districts, and other governorates. The numbers and frequency of protests have steadily grown over the last four days. The protestors remain resilient, bravely fighting back, unarmed, against the oppressor’s brutality, and returning for more the next day. Whatever the outcome may be, the situation in Sudan has become untenable and the ‘fiscal austerity’ program, approved in parliament today, will make it terminal. There will be no escape from the tidal wave of popular uprising.

It’s long overdue, but change will come.

Mark.
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Jun 29 2012 09:28

AFP: Sudan protesters hope for 'revolution'

AJE: #SudanRevolts - Will Sudan experience its own spring?

http://twitter.com/#!/search/%23SudanRevolts

Mark.
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Jul 1 2012 11:04

AFP: 1,000 held, hundreds hurt in Sudan demos

Reuters: Sudan police teargas anti-government protesters

Arabist: Arrests, demonstrations in Sudan coincide with coup anniversary

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Jul 4 2012 12:30

Egypt: Protest at Sudan Embassy against Bashir regime

Quote:
Sudanese residents in Egypt hold protest at their embassy in solidarity with popular home revolt

Tens of Sudanese protested at their embassy Saturday in Cairo in solidarity with an ongoing revolt in their home country against President Omar Hassan Al-Bashir, demanding democratic change.

"We are here in solidarity with the Sudan movement demanding democratic change, a peaceful transition of power, an end to Bashir's austerity policies, and the release of 250 political prisoners in
Khartoum," said Ahmed Essam, a Sudanese student residing in Egypt.

Protests, according to Essam, are taking place simultaneously in 14 different countries, all upholding the same demands. The invitation was spread on Facebook, initiated by members of the Sudan student movement. The call was for expat Sudanese around the world to demonstrate at their respective embassies.

Protests were witnessed in Dallas, New York, Washington DC, Toronto, London, Paris, New Delhi, Kuala Lumpur, Canberra and Cairo, among other cities.

"The call was made to coincide with the Sudanese government's celebration of the 1989 coup that brought Bashir to power, also dating 30 June," explained Essam.

Demonstrations in Sudan against Bashir are now entering their third week. In recent days demonstrators were mobilised in "unprecedented" numbers, despite the arrest of hundreds by the regime's security forces, according to activists.

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Aug 7 2012 10:04

http://sahelblog.wordpress.com/2012/08/03/anti-government-protests-in-darfur/

Quote:
It’s worth keeping an eye on the anti-government, anti-austerity protests that occurred on Tuesday and Wednesday in Darfur, Sudan:
Quote:
Some 400 people gathered in the main market and two other areas of the western city of Nyala [on Wednesday] to protest against the government and rising inflation, but were dispersed by the baton-wielding police, a journalist and witness said.
[...]
More than 1,000 demonstrators clashed with police in Nyala on Tuesday, according to witnesses. Activists published a list of 12 people they said had been killed in Tuesday’s clashes, countering the official death toll of eight.

Map of Nyala here, and more on Tuesday’s protests here.

A wave of anti-austerity protests began in the capital Khartoum and elsewhere in mid-June. These protests in Darfur remind us that people are dissatisfied with the economic situation in various parts of the country, not just at the center. The protests are also a reminder that not all politics in Darfur revolve around rebel movements – though government officials have accused rebel groups of stirring up these protests. I was surprised to learn that Nyala has an estimated population of 500,000, a population is certainly large enough to support a movement of dissent.

In what may be an unrelated incident, a local government official and his driver were shot by unknown gunmen this week in Kutum, Darfur (map). Two similar incidents have occurred in recent months, with gunmen seizing land cruisers (Arabic).

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Entdinglichung
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Feb 8 2013 12:29

the revolt is back in Tunisia after a well-known left-wing and secularist MP was killed:

- http://juralib.noblogs.org/category/la-liberte-est-le-crime-qui-contient...

- http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/07/tunisia-general-strike-assas...

- http://www.internationalviewpoint.org/spip.php?article2885