Wot no Greece thread?

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Django's picture
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May 8 2012 10:57
Wot no Greece thread?

I miss Taxikipali.

So the majority of voters plumped for anti-austerity parties of one stripe or another in the elections, with a leftist party which seems to be the Greek equivalent of Die Linke coming second, the KKE getting 8.5% and the fascists 7%. It looks like Golden Dawn have picked up LAOS' votes, but some of the reports about the intensification of their street presence, attacks on immigrants, "community work", strike support etc, are concerning. They certainly appear to be building a social base.

Looks like a Greek Eurozone exit is firmly on the cards and another election is imminent.

Are there any posters in Greece who can give some insight? With leftists, Stalinists and fascists increasing their popularity, what are anarchists doing to link up with struggles, organise etc? Everyone else appears to be having a lot of success.

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May 8 2012 13:46

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/may/08/eurozone-crisis-greece-elections-bailout

Quote:
Here's a breakdown of Alexis Tsipras's conditions for forming a new government with either of the two 'mainstream' Greek parties (via Ekathimerini

1) The immediate cancellation of all impending measures that will impoverish Greeks further, such as cuts to pensions and salaries.

2) The immediate cancellation of all impending measures that undermine fundamental workers' rights, such as the abolition of collective labor agreements.

3) The immediate abolition of a law granting MPs immunity from prosecution, reform of the electoral law and a general overhaul of the political system. According to Keep Talking Greece, that would include abolishing the 50-seat bonus for the party which wins the most seats.

4) An investigation into Greek banks, and the immediate publication of the audit performed on the Greek banking sector by BlackRock.

5) The setting up of an international auditing committee to investigate the causes of Greece's public deficit, with a moratorium on all debt servicing until the findings of the audit are published.

Sumthing
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May 8 2012 14:02
Quote:
Quote:
Here's a breakdown of Alexis Tsipras's conditions for forming a new government with either of the two 'mainstream' Greek parties (via Ekathimerini
1) The immediate cancellation of all impending measures that will impoverish Greeks further, such as cuts to pensions and salaries.

2) The immediate cancellation of all impending measures that undermine fundamental workers' rights, such as the abolition of collective labor agreements.

3) The immediate abolition of a law granting MPs immunity from prosecution, reform of the electoral law and a general overhaul of the political system. According to Keep Talking Greece, that would include abolishing the 50-seat bonus for the party which wins the most seats.

4) An investigation into Greek banks, and the immediate publication of the audit performed on the Greek banking sector by BlackRock.

5) The setting up of an international auditing committee to investigate the causes of Greece's public deficit, with a moratorium on all debt servicing until the findings of the audit are published.

Also hearing reports that they want to nationalize all the banks. All these aims seem very good to me. Of course they won't be liked by the markets or the criminally negligent politicians who left Greek finances the way they were but things must be worked out. As it is I'm betting on another election taking place.

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May 8 2012 16:03

This victory is complicated. It may seem nice and symbolic that Greeks are turning to more leftist parties to fight austerity, but the fact they have also turned to fascists shows that the public voted for these parties out of desperation. Also, there is no guarantee Syriza can get a coalition as they have the support of the Democratic Left and Communists but they will need PASOK to get a leftist coalition, and PASOK isn't exactly friendly to the anti-austerity movement. But most importantly, will a leftist coalition actually be able to accomplish anything without making capital flee and in turn creating a backlash to leftist policy? This is a no win situation, Syriza and far-left parties talk good games but in the end they will probably act simply as somewhat more left-wing social democrats. The nature of the state to protect private property and commerce will always castrate any leftist governmental reforms.

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May 8 2012 16:17
BanjoRed91 wrote:
The nature of the state to protect private property and commerce will always castrate any leftist governmental reforms.

That's generally true, however at this point of history in Europe, even a - can I say classic? - social democratic rule is a significant change. I wonder if there's a possibility a "left-europe" at all, or are these attempts just a foreplay for even more right wing policies.

As I said somewhere else, my election porn is the turn-out, and I can be quite satisfied. Accordingly to some bits and pieces I found, the participation was historic low in Greece, which has a traditionally high level of participation. It is usually around the 70-80% but this time it was around 65% or below. On the other hand, this is still pretty high which is probably due to the immediate fear of austerity and the desperation to stop it.

And I miss our Taxikipali too!

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May 8 2012 16:25

http://ypsilo.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/brief-analysis-of-greek-elections-result/

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May 8 2012 16:31
Quote:
That's generally true, however at this point of history in Europe, even a - can I say classic? - social democratic rule is a significant change. I wonder if there's a possibility a "left-europe" at all, or are these attempts just a foreplay for even more right wing policies.

Social democratic rule hasn't meant progress (some would say ever) since before Third Wayism, and even during the heyday of social democracy from after WWII to the mid 1970s the struggle of immigrants and other minorities as well as workers continued as much as under conservative governments before then. Again, it may be nice to see that further left parties are winning in Europe, but never forget they work within a state apparatus designed to defend capital and its interests.

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May 8 2012 16:54

Even though the pro-austerity centre (ND, PASOK) have been eviscerated to around 1/3 of the vote, the chances of Syriza (or anybody else) putting together an anti-austerity coalition are blocked by the fact that an irreplaceable chunk of the anti- vote is locked up in either Golden Dawn - who no-one will work with; or KKE, who will work with no-one. Tsipras will fail to form a government. Then it will be PASOK's turn to try - the Ypsilo blog that Entdinglichung linked above, seems to think that PASOK will be able to tempt Democratic Left into selling their soul to support another ND-PASOK coalition. But even if that could happen, it would be a coalition of the election losers, and extremely weak. Yet I can't see further elections overcoming the impasse between the pro-austerity forces having lost a majority and the anti-austerity forces being insurmountably split. (Still, I never thought I'd see Ian Paisley getting into bed with Martin McGuinness, so who ever really knows?...)

GreekFan
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May 9 2012 16:04

I am now an old man who grew up in Greece when I was 10 years old. I am home recovering from brain surgery which may or may not have been successful. I just wanted to say how sad it made me to see that Zonar's cafe was destroyed in Athens. I remember going there with my parents and sister in 1966 for the best chocolate soda on the planet!!! Very sad to see the old hostilities welling up again. I do remember what Hitler was like and I just want to warn my Greek friends, Be careful what you wish for!

GF

801
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May 9 2012 17:07

SOC:

That's generally true, however at this point of history in Europe, even a - can I say classic? - social democratic rule is a significant change. I wonder if there's a possibility a "left-europe" at all, or are these attempts just a foreplay for even more right wing policies.

(I can't work out how to quote properly)

I agree a classic social democratic government would be a significant change.

In my opinion one for the better. I am familiar with all the criticisms and broadly agree with them but I still 'prefer' my state social democratic than the current model where the state sheds its relatively positive roles; social housing, free health and education etc (even if these have served to prolong and protect capitalism) but strengthens its core roles of coercion, repression and 'security'.

Additionally countries with a strong 'Left' tend to have 'better politics' than countries with a barely existent Left. Compare Italy in the 60s and 70s with the US now. There's greater potential for libertarian communists to make their case/do great stuff in a society where the Left, even institutionally, is a greater part of the public discourse.

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May 9 2012 23:57

That's just really inaccurate to be honest.

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May 10 2012 00:11
801 wrote:

Additionally countries with a strong 'Left' tend to have 'better politics' than countries with a barely existent Left. Compare Italy in the 60s and 70s with the US now. There's greater potential for libertarian communists to make their case/do great stuff in a society where the Left, even institutionally, is a greater part of the public discourse.

I can't say this resonates very strongly with the experience of Britain under New Labour. It feels to me like coming out from the failure of the centre-left, and the imminent failure of a centre-right coalition is fervent ground for beginning to talk about the case for libertarian communism....

Soc, I agree with your 'election porn' (especially recent british elections), but not sure that a social democratic party would be any better. First off, I don't believe this is a substantial indicator of the social mood (it seems to fit more with the idea of a 2 party administration, 'oh reds fucked me over, lets go for the blues this time, and visa versa). Secondly, I am not sure what a centre left party in the case of Greece can actually do. The Greek economy is royally fucked, austerity isn't working [sic], but there doesn't seem to be any chance of a Keynesian way out either.

801
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May 10 2012 13:57

I wouldn't describe New Labour as that social democratic though.

I think there are problems with what I said before. I'm not sure that a social democratic political culture necessarily is a good 'recruiting ground' for libertarian communism. In fact I kind of think the opposite having thought about it more...I could be wrong but I think in the archetypal social democracies of Scandinavia people see the state doing a lot and find it harder to imagine life without it.

I think that where there has been a significant Big C Communist Party electoral presence, like in Italy and France that contributes to a political culture where people are not necessarily turned off by the word 'communist' but might be against the authoritarianism/reformism of the Party. The fact that, arguably, Italy and France have seen the most significant libertarian movements could be taken as evidence of this.

I'm willing to admit I may be confusing cause and effect here with reference to political cultures and electorally large Communist Parties.

With reference to Greece and the proper topic of this thread I don't see what Greece can do either...

Mark.
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May 10 2012 22:11

It looks like there will be new elections in June. If the results are anything like this poll then Syriza should be able to form either a minority or coalition government.

Quote:
Here are the results of a Marc poll, conducted two days after the elections and aired by Alpha TV. Syriza are still growing in power it seems, while all other parties are losing voters. the breakdown is as follows:
 
Syriza - 27.7 (128 seats)
New Democracy - 20.3 (57 seats)
Pasok - 12.6 (36 seats)
Independent Greeks - 10.2 (29 seats)
KKE 7 (20 seats)
Golden Dawn 5.7 (16 seats)
Democratic Left 4.9 (14 seats)
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May 10 2012 22:52

No idea what this all means and its pushing to the limit my knowledge of parliamentary systems. So to form a government, they need to win a majority of seats or break a deal and create a coalition right? Seems any possible coalition would be a minority coalition, is that even possible? But I also think there's this new thing were the winning party automatically gets 50 seats just for winning, not sure how that plays into this.

It looks like a clusterfuck without even getting into what happens if they refuse austerity and the loans stop...

From what I know, New Democracy and PASOK are pro-austerity, Independent Greeks are (I think) a anti-austerity splitoff from New Democracy. KKE probably wouldn't agree to enter a coalition. Golden Dawn is a fascist party, so no one is going to enter a coalition with them probably, and I know nothing of the Democratic Left.

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May 11 2012 03:21

Probably, in order to avoid a syriza led government pasok and ND will form a coalition government;

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/may/10/greek-spanish-stability-financial-markets

Mark.
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May 11 2012 10:31

From the Athens News live blog

Quote:
12.30pm New Democracy leader Antonis Samaras has there are still hopes a government could be formed to avoid a repeat poll. Addressing the first meeting of his parliamentary party, he said he welcomed [Democratic Left leader] Fotis Kouvelis' proposal for a government of national unity.
[...]
 Samaras envisages two possible government scenarios: 
• A four-party coalition comprising New Democracy, Syriza, Pasok and the Democratic Left. This would all depend on Syriza, as the other parties have more or less said they could work in government together. 
• If Syriza refuses to join the government, then Samaras says his party would tolerate (ie it would neither vote for it or vote against it) a three-way coalition between Syriza, Pasok and the Democratic Left. 

[…]

10.35am There are also reports that the Democratic Left, which has 19 MPs, is split down the middle. Reuters quotes an unnamed Pasok official as saying that the "party is split right down the middle". For that reason, the official said that "there is a very slim chance for a coalition if Kouvelis agrees". That would confirm what Christoforos Vernardakis (@chrisvernard), a pollster with the VPRC company, tweeted last night. He said that Democratic Left MPs were split 50-50 over whether to participate in government, adding that there was "much resistance from members" to the idea.
 
10.20am The Democratic Left is sending out the message this morning that when they speak of an "ecumenical" (ie national unity) government, they envisage Syriza being part of that.
[...]

Some background on Democratic Left here (written last year).

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May 11 2012 11:09

Looks yer man linked by Entdinglichung above (http://ypsilo.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/brief-analysis-of-greek-elections-result/) called it right. Of course DL's reward for such treachery will be to be utterly annihilated at the next available poll. But then coalition politics is always about old men desperate to get even a fleeting grasp of ministerial office, before they are forced to retire, if only for the pension. "Après moi, le déluge" is ever the watchword of party gerontocrats.

Even if PASOK can't put the loser's coalition together, Syriza's left anti-austerity socdem project will break on the rock of KKE intransigence. For all the wrong reasons, and even worse motives, their position of "nothing short of exit" is likely the inevitable one, in the medium term. The Syriza vision of a rejection of bailout-austerity while still remaining within the EZ, is almost certainly a non-runner, practically.

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May 11 2012 13:22
bbc wrote:
12.09pm:The Democratic left party in Greece has said it will not back a pro-bailout government.

That almost certainly means that Venizelos's attempts to form a government coalition around agreement on the bailout terms are dashed and that the country will face fresh elections.

12.18pm: More from Greece. Democratic left leader Fotis Kouvelis has spelled out why he can't join a government with the two pro-bailout parties Pasok and New Democracy.

He says any coalition must include election runner-up Alexis Tsipras, whose anti-bailout Radical Left Coalition, or Syriza, won 16.78% of the vote and 52 seats in the 300-member parliament. Tsipras has so far refused to join any pro-bailout so unless he has a change of heart it looks like back to the elections.

"It is clear from its reaction that from the first moment, Syriza wanted elections," Kouvelis told his deputies in a speech Friday. "And without Syriza, a government cannot be formed that is in harmony with the popular will, representing the strength of each political party.

"We have made our position clear. In a government with (only) New Democracy and Pasok, we will not take part."

My word. Self-preservation wins out over "power at any cost" within the DL. Time for another election then...

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May 12 2012 11:41

http://blog.occupiedlondon.org/2012/05/11/1-in-2-police-members-voted-nazi-in-last-weeks-elections/

Quote:
In Greece, serving police force members vote in specially assigned polling stations (regardless of their area of residence), together with the local population of those stations. Last Sunday in Athens, 5.000 serving police voted in 11 such specially assigned polling stations. In these precise stations, the Nazis of the Golden Dawn received between 19% and 24% of the total vote. The police who voted there serve in all agencies including DIAS, the undercover police force and others. Only a few meters down the road, in neighbouring stations, the percentage of Golden Dawn dropped to approximately 12-14%. Given that there are approximately 550-700 people voting at each of these stations, and also given that 20-30% of them are police, it can be calculate, with considerable certainty, that the percentage of police who voted for Golden Dawn ranges between 45% and 59%.

http://blog.occupiedlondon.org/2012/05/11/may-9-police-and-nazis-in-joint-operation-against-migrant-traders-and-anarchists-in-central-athens-in-broad-daylight/

Quote:
On May 9, 2012, only days after the election day in which 1 in 2 police voted Nazi, the two conducted a joint operation against the migrant street traders around the Athens School of Economics (ASOEE) and the anarchists who joined in their support. Skirmishes of this kind have been taking place for a while now, with riot police attempting to enforce a dogma of ‘zero tolerance’ and a ‘clean Athens’, in a discourse echoing that of the Golden Dawn (the Nazi party) and yet enforced by ‘socialist’ ministers Chrisochoidis (Public Order) and Loverdos (Health).

On Wednesday’s operation the police openly co-operated with members of the Nazi group Golden Dawn. The two have cooperated many times in the past, whether openly or in disguise. In the videos and photos below members of the GD chant ‘Greece belongs to the Greeks’, sway crow-bars and throw stones to the anarchists who chant ‘the tin-cans have yet to rot’, a reference to the execution (even slaying with tin-cans) of members of the Nazi-collaborating Security Battalions by partisans of EAM-ELAS in September 1944, following the battle between them in the town of Meligalas, SW Peloponnese.

Mark.
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May 12 2012 21:48

Paul Mason: Trying to understand Syriza

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This is less of a blog more of a series of notes to try and enhance understanding of who SYRIZA and its leader Alexis Tsipras actually are, and how they might behave if, as polls suggest, they become the winning party in a second Greek general election. I’ve been troubled by the lack of historical depth in most of the profiles published in newspapers; and of course my own knowledge is limited to English sources...
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May 12 2012 22:13
Arbeiten wrote:
Soc, I agree with your 'election porn' (especially recent british elections), but not sure that a social democratic party would be any better. First off, I don't believe this is a substantial indicator of the social mood (it seems to fit more with the idea of a 2 party administration, 'oh reds fucked me over, lets go for the blues this time, and visa versa). Secondly, I am not sure what a centre left party in the case of Greece can actually do. The Greek economy is royally fucked, austerity isn't working [sic], but there doesn't seem to be any chance of a Keynesian way out either.

What I meant is that in Europe there's a right-wing shift for the last two-three decades and there was not even a serious social democrat (which I understand those who genuinly concerned with the working class, but have no intention to bring down capitalism) in the European politics.

I don't think a social democrat rule would be objectively any better however the lack of social democrat parties in the mainstream political arena, and that they went "underground" (today you are likely to be called anticapitalist just for not getting a shave already, let alone living wage and all that crap) shows quite well that today there's no real fear from a working class revolt. Even the ugly fascist are out only in moderate numbers rather like a pervert symbolism, a floated threat if anything. This part is really sad.

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May 14 2012 05:29

Not unexpected...

Syriza pulls out of talks
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18054612

Mark.
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May 14 2012 11:37

Teacher Dude: Greece's political elite gears up for new elections

The latest poll results as reported in the Athens News:

Quote:
Today's Eleftheros Typos has a new opinion poll, conducted by Rass. The poll is over voter intention and has not been modified to show what the actual share of the vote would be. This is done by removing the abstentions, blank votes and votes for parties that poll below the three-percent threshold.  
 
The poll was conducted on May 10-11 on a nationwide sample of 1,002 people. 
 
Syriza 20.5%
New Democracy 19.4%
Pasok 11.8%
Independent Greeks 7.8%
Democratic Left 6.2%
Communist Party 4.8%
Golden Dawn 3.8%
 
Democratic Alliance 2.4% 
Recreate Greece 2.3%
Popular Orthodox Rally (Laos) 2%
Ecogreens 1.8%
 
Others 3.7%
Spoiled/blank 2.2%
Undecided 11.3%
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May 14 2012 11:58

http://blog.occupiedlondon.org/2012/05/14/collective-agreement-continuance-expires-today-hundreds-of-thousands-of-private-sector-workers-face-wage-decrease/

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Collective agreement continuance expires today; hundreds of thousands of private sector workers face 15-40% wage decrease

As mainstream national and international media occupy themselves with the forming of a coalition government, an extremely significant story has received little coverage in Greece: today marks the expiration of the collective agreement continuance (metenergeia ) for 80 out of a total 0f 220 branch collective agreements in the private sector in the country.

Effectively, this means that every single worker previously covered by these agreements is now left facing their bosses alone; it is expected that hundreds of thousands will see their salary reduced to the national minimum wage, while a number of allowances would also be cut. According to the official timeframe, the remaining 140 branch collective agreements will also expire by May 2013.

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May 14 2012 12:46

Shit. Strikes will happen presumably?

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May 14 2012 12:50

Shit. Strikes will happen presumably?

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May 15 2012 00:19

The bourgeois press here in the states is catching on to the seriousness of the crisis in Greece. Check out this piece by the liberal Atlantic Monthly blog:

Quote:
European leaders and market analysts are starting to forecast the results of a Greek exit from the Eurozone and the projections don't look good.

On Monday, Greece's political leaders failed to form a coalition government, boosting fears of a swift exit from the Eurozone. Now, Bloomberg's Patrick Donahue reports that European Central Bank policymakers gathered in Paris to weigh the possible outcomes of a Greek exit. Meanwhile, global market analysts are feeding the international press their best guesses. Unfortunately for Greece (and the EU) many of the predictions are nightmarish. Here's what analysts say will come of a Greece exit from the Euro:

Interest rates skyrocket. Michael Arghyrou, senior economics lecturer at Cardiff Business School, has bad news for Greeks in need of a loan. "Interest rates will have to double and all mortgages, business loans and other borrowing will become much more expensive," he says. "There will be no credit for Greek banks or the Greek state. That could mean a shortage of basic commodities, like oil or medicine or even foodstuffs." Of course, that's not even the worst of it. "The worst case scenario would be a social and economic breakdown, perhaps even leading to a totalitarian regime," he says.

Bank runs spread to other countries. Bloomberg's Donahue says the threat to other European countries is very real. "A Greek departure from the euro could trigger a default-inducing surge in bond yields, capital flight that might spread to other indebted states and a resultant series of bank runs," he writes. "Although Greece accounts for 2 percent of the euro-area’s economic output, its exit would fragment a system of monetary union designed to be irreversible and might cause investors to raise the threat of withdrawal by other states."

Greek citizens migrate en masse. In a chain of events, The Observer's Julia Kollewe sees Greek skilled labor exiting the country. "The depreciation of the new currency will make imported goods more expensive and drive up inflation," she writes.

Mass unemployment is likely, as is an exodus of young skilled workers. If tens of thousands of Greeks headed to the borders, they might even be closed. Greek soldiers patrolling the roads and ports to keep their fellow citizens in? It is not impossible."

Europe increases its bailout fund
. Charles Grant, director of the London think tank Centre for European Reform, says the EU will have to invest more in its precautionary bailout fund. "If Greece moves towards exiting the euro ... the EU would then need to enlarge its bailout funds and prepare other emergency measures."

Unemployment surges. Jan Randolph, head of sovereign risk at IHS Global Insight, says everyone is missing the possibility of a government shutdown following by an unemployment surge. "If credit is withdrawn by the EU and IMF, then Greece becomes a cash economy. It means the government can only pay what it collects," writes Randolph. "The government starts shutting down, 10-15% of state employees don't get paid and unemployment surges from 20% to 30% ... The Greek banking sector would collapse as well."

I don't really know if the sort of situations described (which could just be fear-mongering?) increase revolutionary potential in Greece or decrease it. My gut reaction is that whatever breeds nightmares in our enemies is a sign that our dreams are closer to reality. But I fear the toll this will take on our class brothers and sisters in Greece if they fail to self-organize or fall prey to nationalism or authoritarianism.

Maybe others have some thoughts on this?

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May 15 2012 08:52

NB, the crisis this week is only indirectly Greece. The real proximate trigger at the moment is the German/Spanish 10 year spread ( http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/.SPGERSP:IND ). This crossed the 450 bps line last Friday. If they can't get that spread back below the 450 line by this weekend, then LCH.Clearnet raises the margin for Spanish bonds in the repo market from 5 to 15% (see here and here for ref). The actual number of working days the spread needs to be above the threshold for them to raise this seems to vary a bit, if last December's Italian spread crisis is anything to go by, but it's supposed to be around 5 working days. In other words, Spain gets forced out of the bond market and will require a bailout in time for its next re-financing operation (which will be soon enough, both Spain & Italy have very tight schedules this year).

This is why the megaphone diplomacy has been cranked up since Monday ("Civil war!", "Gangs with Kalashnikovs fighting for control of the streets!", etc, etc) in a vain attempt to get the DL to fold, a compliant government promised and a swift ECB intervention to try and get the Spanish spreads down by the end of the week. So far, no joy.

Mark.
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May 15 2012 23:14

In case anyone hasn't been paying attention today the talking is over and new elections will be held, probably on 17 June.

-----

AJE video on Greek media and coverage of the crisis:

-----

From the Greek streets: bookshop and publishing house workers on strike

-----

Also: Catastroika, a new documentary from the makers of Debtocracy

Quote:
The creators of Debtocracy, a documentary with two million views broadcasted from Japan to Latin America, analyze the shifting of state assets to private hands.

They travel round the world gathering data on privatization in developed countries and search for clues on the day after Greece’s massive privatization program.

Mark.
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May 16 2012 11:55

The latest poll results

Quote:
We've a new nationwide poll, this time from the VPRC company and published in Epikaira magazine. It was carried out between May 10-14 on a sample of 804 people. 
 
It shows voter intention and includes don't know, abstentions, etc. The actual share of each party would be higher 
 
Party: (voter intention)
 
Syriza: 20.3% 
New Democracy: 14.2%
Pasok: 10.9% 
Democratic Left: 6.1%
Communist Party: 4.4%
Independent Greeks: 3.7% 
Golden Dawn: 2.2%
Recreate Greece: 1.6%

Other parties 2.3%
Undecided: 17.3%
Don't know/No answer: 6%
Abstention/spoiled/blank: 9.7%

[…]

An opinion poll published yesterday for the Attica prefecture shows that Syriza could take a combined 32 percent in area's five constituencies: Athens A, Athens B, Piraeus A, Piraeus B and Attica. 
 
What does the poll say? Syriza's support has surged an impressive 11.2 points. It's likely that it's attracting support from the Communist Party (down 2.5 points), Independent Greeks supporters (down one point) and other minor parties.
 
The figures below show the share that the parties could expect in poll (excluding abstentions, don't knows, spoiled votes etc). The poll was conducted by the statistics department of the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB) for Extra3 TV.

Syriza: 31.9% (20.7)
New Democracy: 13.8% (13.7)
Independent Greeks: 12.8% (11.7)
Pasok: 8.7% (8.7)
Communist Party: 6.8% (9.37)
Golden Dawn: 5.8% (8.7)
Democratic Left: 5.5% (5.9)
Recreate Greece: 3.5% (2.9)
Ecogreens: 3.4% (3.3)
Popular Orthodox Rally (Laos): 3% (3.2)
Drasi: 2.5% (2.6)
Democratic Alliance: 1.2% (2)
Anticapitalist Left (Antarsya): 0.6% (1.25)
Social Pact: 0.4% (1.02)

The Attica prefecture includes Athens and the area around it with about half of Greece's population. Support for New Democracy would be much higher in most rural areas and smaller towns. On 6 May Syriza got the most votes in Attica and also in Thessaloniki, Patra and Iraklio, the only other places in Greece that could really be called big cities.

The national poll results show Golden Dawn coming in under the three per cent threshold for representation in parliament.