Postal workers' national strikes, 2007

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Mike Harman
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Jul 20 2007 15:50

That'd be great Forty Twenty. It's all starting to get interesting I think.

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Forty Twenty
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Jul 20 2007 16:43

It is. It's nice to see more and more workers refusing to use their cars and not starting work before their official start time. It's always been a big problem and one which certainly has caused job losses. When our substitute rep read out a letter from Bob Gibson of the EC asking for a voluntary car ban at a meeting yesterday morning, he was shouted down by half a dozen people every one of whom has had reason to get help from the CWU in recent years. Selfish idiots.

martinh
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Jul 20 2007 19:24

A question for posties - I've seen a few letters and rants from posties in the press about blacking private mail for the "final mile" - is this a workable tactic in your view? (probably quite hard to do as I'm fairly sure it's illegal)

Regards,

Martin

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Forty Twenty
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Jul 20 2007 20:38

I would think it's illegal, but my personal view would be to take it, and either bring back anything which could not be completed within the three and a half hour delivery span, or deliver it all and book overtime. There is far more of this stuff being posted now than there ever was before private firms were allowed to use the postal system and the Royal Mail equivalent of 'unstamped' second class (the stuff with the big '2' in the top right corner) is dying out. If staff are smart about it, they could cause some real problems for management as this Down Stream Access, as it is called, increases.

tony
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Jul 20 2007 20:44

Yes it would be unlawful, under the Anti-Union laws, as you would be taking industrial action against a business that is not your employer. The Union would not even legally be allowed to ballot us on this.

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Forty Twenty
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Jul 20 2007 21:45

http://www.royalmailchat.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2832

More industrial action in London.

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Devrim
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Jul 20 2007 21:52

I haven't been paying that much attention to all this though I do realise it is the most important dispute in the UK at the moment. However, I have noticed that there have been lots of reports of small local strikes in the past week, or so. When I worked in the P.O. in the mid to late 80's, the management took the offensive after the one day strike over DRAS in 1989, and forced a national strike. Do people who work there see this happening now?
Devrim

tony
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Jul 20 2007 23:54

Who know's? In 1989 we had a Tory Government. Today we have a New Labour/Tory Government.
I think our current Senior Managers (Leighton & Crozier) who were appointed by New Labour would like to take on and defeat and destroy the Union. I don't think they were expecting the ballot result (77.5%) for strike action, or the support for the strikes (95%). This has knocked them back, and may have made them a bit more reluctant to provoke an all out strike. There is provocation happening locally, as in Oxford, but whether this is due to aggressive local managers or directives from above remains to be seen.

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Devrim
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Jul 21 2007 06:56
tony wrote:
Who know's? In 1989 we had a Tory Government. Today we have a New Labour/Tory Government.

To be honest I don't really think that this makes any difference at all.

tony wrote:
I don't think they were expecting the ballot result (77.5%) for strike action, or the support for the strikes (95%).

I can'tremember the ballot result in '89 (it was over DRAS, which was a poxy issue), nor do I have the exact percentage of strikers. I do remember that in my district (SW London) there were two scabs from maybe 3500 workers, which suggests it was much higher.

tony wrote:
There is provocation happening locally, as in Oxford, but whether this is due to aggressive local managers or directives from above remains to be seen.

It could be either. I think that it is a good tactic from the management either way. Either it forces a national strike (which I think they may be looking for), or it allows them to pick off offices one by one.
Devrim

tony
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Jul 21 2007 10:38

Things have changed here, industrially and politically, since the 1980's

Mike Harman
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Jul 21 2007 11:39
Devrim wrote:
Either it forces a national strike (which I think they may be looking for), or it allows them to pick off offices one by one.
Devrim

Devrim there's already a national strike. The two one dayers, then the rolling action next week, are national strikes.

However there's also the Oxford wildcat, and the Bristol one was a one-off local issue that may not even have been co-ordinated with the nationals. There's also a work to rule/318 in Southend (resulting in 70 managers shipped in to take up the slack). I think there's a chance that there'll be more wildcats - either due to local provocation or Oxford's work being sent around, or very possibly more work-to-rules. Whether victimisation around those could then provoke a very wide-spread wildcat I dunno.

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Devrim
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Jul 21 2007 12:11
Catch wrote:
Devrim there's already a national strike. The two one dayers, then the rolling action next week, are national strikes.

By national strike, I meant all out strike. I don't think that these one day strikes, or rolling actions have that much of an effect. It just slows down the service slightl, but the service is still running. If things haven't changed that much from when I worked there, the workers won't be losing that much money either s they will be clearing the backlog on overtime. For workers to take on the PO they need an all out strike, and to stop the service.

Catch wrote:
However there's also the Oxford wildcat, and the Bristol one was a one-off local issue that may not even have been co-ordinated with the nationals. There's also a work to rule/318 in Southend (resulting in 70 managers shipped in to take up the slack). I think there's a chance that there'll be more wildcats - either due to local provocation or Oxford's work being sent around, or very possibly more work-to-rules. Whether victimisation around those could then provoke a very wide-spread wildcat I dunno.

Yes, management has the possibility to turn these isolated strikes into a major confrontation if that is what they want. All they would have to do is start to divert mail from offices in dispute, and suspend people for refusing to handle it. Workers also have the same possibility, but it is much more difficult for them. It would invole sending out flying pickets, which is illegal. To do this workers would need a level of self-organisation, and confidence which doesn't seem to be there at the moment.

tony wrote:
Things have changed here, industrially and politically, since the 1980's

Yes, many things have' and that makes it difficult for me to comment. Some things are still the same though.

Devrim

Mike Harman
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Jul 21 2007 12:23
Devrim wrote:
Catch wrote:
Devrim there's already a national strike.
The two one dayers, then the rolling action next week, are national strikes.

By national strike, I meant all out strike.

I thought that was what you meant, just checkin'.

Quote:
I don't think that these one day strikes, or rolling actions have that much of an effect.

No me neither. The rolling actions are maybe a little better, but it's going to involve different groups of workers crossing each others picket lines all week which is very, very stupid.

Quote:
If things haven't changed that much from when I worked there, the workers won't be losing that much money either s they will be clearing the backlog on overtime. For workers to take on the PO they need an all out strike, and to stop the service.

Well, a few on royalmailchat are complaining about losing money, they may well be RM managers though.

Quote:
Yes, management has the possibility to turn these isolated strikes into a major confrontation if that is what they want. All they would have to do is start to divert mail from offices in dispute, and suspend people for refusing to handle it. Workers also have the same possibility, but it is much more difficult for them. It would invole sending out flying pickets, which is illegal. To do this workers would need a level of self-organisation, and confidence which doesn't seem to be there at the moment.

Yeah. There's some communication on royalmailchat which circumvents both the union and the flying pickets issue. It'll be interesting if it leads to co-ordination (whereas now it's mainly talking about co-ordination).

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Steven.
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Jul 21 2007 12:41
Mike Harman wrote:
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If things haven't changed that much from when I worked there, the workers won't be losing that much money either s they will be clearing the backlog on overtime. For workers to take on the PO they need an all out strike, and to stop the service.

Well, a few on royalmailchat are complaining about losing money, they may well be RM managers though.

Some are saying the RM is hiring casuals instead of postal workers on overtime.

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Devrim
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Jul 21 2007 13:16
John. wrote:
Some are saying the RM is hiring casuals instead of postal workers on overtime.

I think that it is quite clear that in the short term you can not replace the workforce with casuals. The service would grind to a halt very quickly. Again the issue of casuals is one that workers can use to develop action.
I imagine that more of the sorting is mechanised than in my day, but there must be some, and casual staff can not do the sorting. It would be to slow to make it worthwhile. The logical way to use casuals is to get the postmen to do the prep, and then send the casuals out on delivery. They will still be slower, but not that much slower.
I don't think that the RM management believe that they can run the service with casuals in the event of an all out strike.
All of the stuff that management, and casuals seem to be doing now is support for the main service. I imagine that management are clearing boxes, and delivering RMSD, and the like. Casuals will be delivering preped work. However, there is no point in clearing the boxes if there is nobody to deliver the mail. The casuals can do nothing if there is no work already preped.
One possibility for workers to escalate the struggle is to refuse to work with casuals (I imagine that the causualisation process is a lot more advanced than it was twenty years ago). This leaves the manager with two options either giving in, or suspending somebody, and causing a strike.
Another issue was brought up by forty twenty:

forty twenty wrote:
It is. It's nice to see more and more workers refusing to use their cars and not starting work before their official start time. It's always been a big problem and one which certainly has caused job losses. When our substitute rep read out a letter from Bob Gibson of the EC asking for a voluntary car ban at a meeting yesterday morning, he was shouted down by half a dozen people every one of whom has had reason to get help from the CWU in recent years. Selfish idiots.

It was against the rules to use your own car in the 80s (some people still did though). I think in times of dispute, especially actions like these one day strikes, the postmen should be at their most unco-operative. We had a work to rule one Christmas (I think 1987). I didn't deliver any mail for three weeks. There are lots of things that can be done; an overtime ban,every postman weighs his bag before he goes out (in my day it was 35lbs-it dosn't matter what the weight is, 118 postmen queeing up to weigh their bags causes a delay), stick to the cut off, work at a slightly more relaxed pace...
This will cause a backlog by itself, added to the backlog caused by any strike action, it will start to clog up the system. Also, and equally importantly, it brings the workers directly into the struggle themselves, giving them some control over the struggle, however small. It also escaltes the struggle, however slightly.
Devrim

Vaneigemappreci...
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Jul 21 2007 13:44

support for the strike amongst the public in brum has been pretty positive, local wobblies have been leafletting in support of the strike and some very early risers did a banner drop in support ot the strike, the vibe on the royalmail forums seems really postive too.

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/regions/birmingham/2007/07/376537.html

Mike Harman
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Jul 21 2007 13:51

OK this culled from royalmailchat - some kind of Royal Mail strike information service circular that goes out to businesses:

Quote:
Thank you for signing up to this service. Our intention is to keep you up to date with any developments regarding industrial action.

Strike action starting Wednesday 25th July

Royal Mail is hugely disappointed that the Communication Workers Union has announced a series of strikes over a two-week period beginning at 7pm on Wednesday 25th July 2007, and ending at 12 noon on Wednesday 8th August.
The situation is complex, but we have identified the probable impact on services for the week commencing 23rd July. The strike will affect all Mail Centres, and 26 Delivery Offices that are co-located with Mail Centres on Thursday 26th July. The remaining Delivery and Collection services will not be available on Saturday 28th July.

Please note, this does not affect Royal Mail's operations in Northern Ireland,

We have well-developed contingency plans designed to reduce the effect of the strike and keep disruption to our customers to a minimum. Managers will be volunteering to help keep as much of the service operating as possible.

We are currently assessing the likely impact on mail services for week commencing 30th July and we will update you in due course.

Here is the list of Delivery Offices that may be on strike on 26th July:

• Cambridge Delivery
• Canterbury MC Delivery
• Cardiff Delivery
• Coventry Delivery
• Darlington Delivery
• Dartford Deliveries
• Derby Delivery
• Doncaster Delivery
• Hemel H. Delivery
• Inverness MC Delivery
• Maidstone MC Delivery
• Manchester MC Delivery
• Northampton MC Deliveries
• Norwich Delivery
• Oldham Delivery
• Paddington Deliveries
• Reading MC Delivery
• Romford MC Delivery
• Shrewsbury MC Delivery
• Swansea MC Delivery
• Tonbridge MC Delivery
• Truro MC Delivery
• Watford MC Delivery
• Wolverhampton MC Delivery
• Worcester MC Delivery
• York MC Delivery

What this means for you
• There will be normal access to Royal Mail services on Thursday 26th July.
• On Saturday 28th July services will be limited to a single collection from Post Boxes outside of Post Offices and these collections may be earlier than the normal advertised times.
• There will be no delivery or collection services on Saturday 28th July.
• We will attempt to deliver Special Delivery items. Special Delivery Saturday guarantee will be suspended for Saturday 28th July.
• Parcelforce Worldwide's guaranteed services will remain unaffected.
• Royal Mail's Branch Direct, Sameday and Door to Door services remain unaffected
• All other mail services will be subject to delay.

How can you help us to minimise disruption to your mail?
• Please try to bring your planned mailings forward to avoid Thursday 26th July
• Do not post on the day of any strike, but post early in the day if you really have to
• Try to post at your local Post Office, but be aware that will not be able to accept bulk mailings (refer to the messages for Business Customers below).
• Normal customer service helpline - 08457 740 740 will operate - but will be very busy - so please be patient.
• Royal Mail's website will contain the latest updated information.

Messages for Business Customers
• Business customers who use bulk mailings are asked to bring forward postings to the earlier part of the week if at all possible.
• We regret that on Thursday 26th July Royal Mail's Mail Centres will not collect from business customers
• Please avoid posting on Thursday 26th July.
• There will be no delivery services on Saturday 28th July.
• Please provide us with as accurate and as early forecasts as possible.
• Tell your account manager or Customer Operations Manager (COM) as much as possible about your mailing plans. This will help us to plan our resources.

24-Hour strike on Monday July 23rd in Northern Ireland
The Communication Workers Union has previously announced a 24-hour strike in Northern Ireland only, starting at 7pm on Sunday July 22nd and continuing through Monday July 23rd. Again, we have well-developed contingency plans to minimise the impact on your mail services, but there will inevitably be some disruption.

Unsubscribe me from further Royal Mail communications

Royal Mail Group Ltd is registered in England and Wales, under number 4138203, registered office 148 Old Street, London EC1V 9HQ. Mailsort®, Walksort®, Presstream®, Royal Mail, the Royal Mail cruciform and the colour red are registered trade marks of Royal Mail Group Ltd in the UK and other countries.

Mike Harman
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Jul 21 2007 15:43

More from Southend. Apparently Watford is similar at the moment.

http://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/local/display.var.1559168.0.posties_complain_of_intimidation.php

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Jul 21 2007 16:08

Liverpool C.W.U. March and Rally.
21 July 2007.

Around 1,000 people turned up for a march and rally in central Liverpool this afternoon. The constant rain did not dampen the enthusiasm of the demonstrators and there was a good deal of support from the general public as the march passed close to the main shopping area.
C.W.U members brought banners from Wolverhampton and District, Newcastle on Tyne, Bolton, Bury, Stockport, Manchester, Edinburgh, Harrow and Merseyside. Also on display were banners from the Anarchist Federation, Socialist Party, Socialist Workers Party, Socialist Labour Party, C.N.D, Stop the War Coalition, Liverpool Trades Council, Manchester Unison, Huyton C.N.D, Uni (the international postal workers union) and Sefton Unison.
Mark Walsh, Brach Secretary of Merseyside Amal. Branch was the first speaker. He announced that Dave Ward had been asked to attend a meeting with Allan Leighton. Of course there is no way of knowing what this meeting is about, but it seems unlikely that Leighton would ask for it simply to reiterate the ‘there is no more money available’ mantra.

Kieran Quinn told the meeting that when Leighton was asked which he considered was the greatest company in the world, he had replied “Wal-Mart”. Leighton had once worked for Wal-Mart and as Wal-Mart recognise no union and this is the way Leighton would like to see Royal Mail.
Frank Hont, Regional Secretary of Unison thanked C.W.U members for their support in past Unison campaigns and stated postal workers could always be relied on to respect Unison picket lines. He called on greater co-operation between trade unions in the campaigns ahead, a sentiment which was met with enthusiastic applause.

Geraldine Smith, Member of Parliament for Morecambe and Lunesdale addressed the meeting and expressed her wish that fellow Labour Party MP’s would speak out against Leighton and Crozier. Ms Smith, a former postal worker, has collected over 100 signatures for an Early Day Motion opposing their plan for the postal service.

The comrade from Uni told the rally that that the campaign against cuts in the postal service went far beyond Liverpool, Britain and Europe and had taken on an international aspect.

Billy Hayes asked the crowd what they thought of Allan Leighton, and if wishes were granted, plans for Leighton’s funeral would be underway quite soon. Billy announced that support from industrial action had increased from 77% of C.W.U members to 84% since strikes had taken place. He challenged the Government, who many workers had voted for, to take Postcomm to task and support the unions. Hayes also challenged Labour Members of Parliament who had been silent or who had criticised the strikes to get behind the campaign and reminded them that none of them had had 77% support from the electorate and that if they had, they might be in a better position to tell the C.W.U how to go about its business. Hayes stated that such meetings as this, and the industrial action which had taken place were only the start.

Jane Loftus C.W.U President thanked everyone for their attendance in such weather, and said the campaign would continue and that a united campaign with other public sector workers was essential. Let’s hope the leaders of the relevant unions pay attention to these calls from their rank and file members.

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Steven.
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Jul 21 2007 16:08

A lot of very negative comments on the oxford mail site. I smell management about a good few of the posts:
http://www.thisisoxfordshire.co.uk/mostpopular.var.1552090.mostviewed.wildcat_post_strike_to_continue.php

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Jul 21 2007 16:43
Devrim wrote:
It was against the rules to use your own car in the 80s (some people still did though).

The problem today is that car use is actively encouraged by management. We had three new starters two weeks ago and the people training them had all been in the job less than a year and without exeption used their cars to convey themselves and several bags of mail to the delivery. Not a voice raise by either managers or even the local rep when I approached him about it.
Also, there's the issue of this 'bond' which staff believe covers then in the event of a RTA. The union has publicided several cases where staff having accidents in cars have not been covered, but the myth persists, or probably nearer the mark, know it's a myth and hope it will never happen to them.

Devrim wrote:
I think in times of dispute, especially actions like these one day strikes, the postmen should be at their most unco-operative. We had a work to rule one Christmas (I think 1987). I didn't deliver any mail for three weeks. There are lots of things that can be done; an overtime ban,every postman weighs his bag before he goes out (in my day it was 35lbs-it dosn't matter what the weight is, 118 postmen queeing up to weigh their bags causes a delay), stick to the cut off, work at a slightly more relaxed pace...
This will cause a backlog by itself, added to the backlog caused by any strike action, it will start to clog up the system. Also, and equally importantly, it brings the workers directly into the struggle themselves, giving them some control over the struggle, however small. It also escaltes the struggle, however slightly.
Devrim

I always weigh my bags. These days it's 16 kilo maximum for a delivery pouch and 11 kilo maximum for a drop bag. An overtime ban would be great, and more and more people refuse to work overtime because of the amount of mail these days means Royal Mail expect it to be done in six and a half hours, which is pushing it on many deliveries despite Crozier saying we're 40% underworked. But there are always grabbers and the desperate who will work it. Much overtime performed by drivers is Scheduled Attendance which is allocated to their duties and can only be stopped by either side giving three months notice. I've always been opposed to S.A as in my view holding duties solely for overtime working keeps people unemployed.
I work at a relaxed pace. They don't pay me enough to do otherwise, so I brew up whenever I feel like (although in some offices I hear managers are stopping this) take my time sorting, and generally do the job as it should be done. Unfortunately, job and finish is knackering the job and staff are doing themselves out of a job at worst and asking for hours to be reduced at best if it continues.

You mention the mechanised sorting. I would say if our office is anything to go by, at least sixty per cent of letters would be machine sorted. Flats and packets are still sorted by hand. They would still struggle as they did in 1988 using casuals to sort manually. A problem with Royal Mail using casuals (if it's true) is many people these days seem to think every casual worker has arrived here from the EC or further afield and certain groups will use this to attack immigration as has been seen already on royalmailchat. I don't need to tell anyone on here that a worker is a worker and a scab is a scab regardless of where they come from, but some people need it spelling out to them.

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Jul 21 2007 19:55
Forty Twenty wrote:
I always weigh my bags. These days it's 16 kilo maximum for a delivery pouch and 11 kilo maximum for a drop bag. An overtime ban would be great, and more and more people refuse to work overtime because of the amount of mail these days means Royal Mail expect it to be done in six and a half hours, which is pushing it on many deliveries despite Crozier saying we're 40% underworked. But there are always grabbers and the desperate who will work it. Much overtime performed by drivers is Scheduled Attendance which is allocated to their duties and can only be stopped by either side giving three months notice. I've always been opposed to S.A as in my view holding duties solely for overtime working keeps people unemployed.
I work at a relaxed pace. They don't pay me enough to do otherwise, so I brew up whenever I feel like (although in some offices I hear managers are stopping this) take my time sorting, and generally do the job as it should be done.

Well, it sounds like you are wokring normally. There are always grabbers. When I worked there, it was the UCW Branch Chair. Also, S.A. sounds like a problem.

The point is that whatever you do yourself gets screwed up when some are bashing he dockets really hard. Do you still have kitchen meetings at the P.O.? I think that this is the place to be pushing for everyone to start weighing their bags, stop screwing around with their cars.

Forty Twenty wrote:
Unfortunately, job and finish is knackering the job and staff are doing themselves out of a job at worst and asking for hours to be reduced at best if it continues.

It has always been a problem. I remember big arguments about driving without seatbelts on, and with the Sherpa doors open. Yes, it was unsafe, but on job, and finish...

Forty Twenty wrote:
You mention the mechanised sorting. I would say if our office is anything to go by, at least sixty per cent of letters would be machine sorted. Flats and packets are still sorted by hand. They would still struggle as they did in 1988 using casuals to sort manually.

What is it like in the DOs? How accurate are the machines? In my day a walk sorted pack would only be about 50% true.

Forty Twenty wrote:
A problem with Royal Mail using casuals (if it's true) is many people these days seem to think every casual worker has arrived here from the EC or further afield and certain groups will use this to attack immigration as has been seen already on royalmailchat. I don't need to tell anyone on here that a worker is a worker and a scab is a scab regardless of where they come from, but some people need it spelling out to them.

You raise important questions here. I was recently working at a car factory in the Czech Republic (Skoda Auto). We had a strike there a few months ago. We did a couple of leaflets on the strike, double sided A4, one side Czech, one side Polish. From 28,000 workers (in total), 2300 were Poles (more on the lines). It is an issue that we will have to confront more often in the future.

Devrim

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Jul 21 2007 20:31
Devrim wrote:
Do you still have kitchen meetings at the P.O.?

Not these days. Since one delivery a day came in, we never all sit down together for a break. We used to have some good debates, but there were more militant workers when I started than there are now. You might not agree with everything they said, but there was no doubt that when push came to shove you were on the same side. Our rep is bloody awful. Ex-Labour councillor who fixed his daughter up with a nice house and who the management keep on side with a few hours overtime. One utter bastard really

Devrim wrote:
What is it like in the DOs? How accurate are the machines? In my day a walk sorted pack would only be about 50% true.

They're much more accurate these days. Certainly into the high nineties. They're on about walk sequencing machines now which means no prepping at all. It's the old story which we're all familiar with. The modern day spinning Jenny in a real sense with all the problems for us which would have been recognised back then. Modernisation eh? wink

Devrim wrote:
Forty Twenty wrote:
A problem with Royal Mail using casuals (if it's true) is many people these days seem to think every casual worker has arrived here from the EC or further afield and certain groups will use this to attack immigration as has been seen already on royalmailchat. I don't need to tell anyone on here that a worker is a worker and a scab is a scab regardless of where they come from, but some people need it spelling out to them.

You raise important questions here. I was recently working at a car factory in the Czech Republic (Skoda Auto). We had a strike there a few months ago. We did a couple of leaflets on the strike, double sided A4, one side Czech, one side Polish. From 28,000 workers (in total), 2300 were Poles (more on the lines). It is an issue that we will have to confront more often in the future.

Devrim

Yes, I think it's something we've all got to come to terms with. I'm old enough to remember the support Powell had in the late 60s among many trade unionists. I wouldn't want to see that again, but because of the way Labour deals with the issue of immigration and asylum seekers they've created an atmosphere of hostility towards new arrivals which gives these racist bastards licence to carry on. Anyway, I'm preaching to the converted here.
Why not register on www.royalmailchat.co.uk and give your thoughts?

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Devrim
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Jul 21 2007 20:45
Forty Twenty wrote:
Why not register on www.royalmailchat.co.uk and give your thoughts?

Thanks, I just have. Are you posting there as 'IWW Fellow Worker'? It is the same rally report.
I remember meeting Billy Hayes when I went to a Broad Left meeting once. It doesn't seem like he has changed much.
Devrim

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Forty Twenty
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Jul 21 2007 21:20
Devrim wrote:
Forty Twenty wrote:
Why not register on www.royalmailchat.co.uk and give your thoughts?

Thanks, I just have. Are you posting there as 'IWW Fellow Worker'? It is the same rally report.
I remember meeting Billy Hayes when I went to a Broad Left meeting once. It doesn't seem like he has changed much.
Devrim

Yes, that's me mate. Billy wouldn't be where he is today without the backing of a big branch. He had the good fortune to be in the right place at the right time when Royal Mail wanted to close Copperas Hill, made a couple of speeches to both rallies and bingo! Deputy General Secreatary's job.

Mike Harman
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Jul 21 2007 22:36

Post office in Coventry on strike - another local dispute seperate from the national ones:

http://tinyurl.com/37e3yu

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2007/07/376650.html

Mike Harman
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Jul 22 2007 13:36

Oxford wildcat ends today/tomorrow. Apparently there was a meeting between Dave Ward (CWU) and Leighton (Royal Mail), then between Dave Ward and the strikers, then a meeting at Cowley Workers' club which voted to end the strike.

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Steven.
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Jul 23 2007 08:49

So did the guy get re-instated?

Mike Harman
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Jul 23 2007 08:52

I assume so. There was talk of it spreading to the rest of Oxford if the CWU/RM meeting didn't go well, so if he isn't reinstated it's a massive climbdown.

Mike Harman
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Jul 23 2007 08:58
Quote:
Mr Fay said a Royal Mail manager from out of the area and a union official would now oversee disciplinary action in the wake of the two suspensions, and that the matter would be resolved within three weeks.

http://www.oxfordmail.net/display.var.1563692.0.postal_strike_ends.php

I guess that means back to work on disciplinary??

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