The student and education workers demo on the 24th Nov

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ernie
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Nov 18 2010 21:41
The student and education workers demo on the 24th Nov

There does not seem to be any discussion about the forthcoming student and education workers demonstration and what sort of activity could be carried out. Is there to be a radical workers and student bloc, or any other form of activity in relation to the demo, and if so is there any proposals for any meetings or discussions on what such a blocs or action's attitude should be?

The present vague proposed plan appears to be to march on the Libdem HQ, which is would appear not only to be rather pointless but pretty dangerous given the states declared aim of cracking down on a rerun of what happened at Tory party HQ.

Even if there is no block etc it would be useful to have a discussion not only about this demonstration but the whole question of the ferment that appears to be developing in some universities and FE colleges amongst students and staff, and how best to participate in this.

Caiman del Barrio
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Nov 18 2010 22:24

In Colchester I've seen no evidence of building to this, be they flyposters, leaflets, word of a rally, nothing.

Yorkie Bar
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Nov 18 2010 22:30

Stuff is happening in York and Leeds on the day, beyond that and the stuff in London I don't know. I think trying to organise an anarchist presence in the current climate would just make us a target.

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Joseph Kay
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Nov 18 2010 23:53

The London stuff just sounds like the EAN (SWP front) jostling to position itself as the militant leadership, no doubt negotiating a kettle with the cops whilst declaring its 'intention' to beseige Lib Dem HQ. a few students get their heads caved in by TSG and Socialist Worker has some photogenic martys for its front page.

locally (Brighton) things are looking more interesting - potentially. there's signs that sixth formers are getting organised and could be walking out. that might be the first sign of things leaving campus and becoming more of a student movement than 'campus radicalism'. or it might be a tedious, overpoliced A-B. it's really hard to tell, but something feels like it's changed since Millbank. i don't know if it has, or if my politics are clouding my perception.

Jason Cortez
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Nov 19 2010 00:31

Well, i think us folk in london should putting stuff out pointing out the likely result of the LibDem HQ siege and suggesting alternatives, like roaming marches which on focus a few specific targets and generally snarl up London stop the circuits capital beard Whilst occupations would be great, it is pretty clear that students want to 'walk out' and are hoping for a repeat of the 10th. I think the occupations make come after the 24th. Plus it is pretty hard for sixth formers to have the confidence to occupy. Looks like some students are meeting up to go en masse to cowley st.

dinosavros
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Nov 19 2010 02:18

Speaking as an outside observer it would be a good idea to try and inform students in advance about covering up their faces this time, carrying a change of clothes, anything to prevent identification, maybe via fitwatch or something like that.

I was amazed at how naive some of the students were at millbank, completely unaware of how they were being photographed and the potential repurcussions. And I was just as amazed at how many cameras were constantly going off, plus the tweets and everything, very 'information age'.

Maybe some self-criticism about black bloc tactics is in order, some have been hyper critical of black blocs here on libcom in the past but the last events have shown that even if theyre fetishized by activist types, especially in the english speaking world, the reasoning behind them is necessary, if used intelligently.

I also agree that showing up at the lib dem hq on the 24th sounds completely self-defeating.

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Joseph Kay
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Nov 19 2010 07:55
dinosavros wrote:
Maybe some self-criticism about black bloc tactics is in order, some have been hyper critical of black blocs here on libcom in the past but the last events have shown that even if theyre fetishized by activist types, especially in the english speaking world, the reasoning behind them is necessary, if used intelligently.

well, I don't think disguising your identity is the same as a black block. if there'd have been an actual visible black block on the 10-11-10 march (as opposed to a handful of people in black in a huge crowd) I think that would have broadcasted an intention to cause trouble. it's not so much even that black block is fetishised as a tactic, but that a lot of the anarchists I know don't seem to own any other kind of clothing, it's an identity as much as anything. I think urging people to conceal identities when committing violent disorder is smart, but I think turning up on marches in anarchist fancy dress is generally counter-productive (with some exceptions of course).

ernie
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Nov 19 2010 12:43

From what we experienced at the 'organising meeting' on Monday it would seem that the Left is seeking to impose itself on what is not a clearly defined movement at the moment. One things is certain the Left and the state do not want a re-run of the last demonstration, by which I do not mean Millbank but the general expression of the will to struggle by thousands of young and not so young people. They want to corral it into their proposed delivering up of workers and students to the state, which is what a mach on Lib Dem HQ would amount to.

Roaming demonstrations with the aim of disrupting the capital doesn't really hold out any real focus or opportunity to use such a gathering of students and workers as a means for helping to develop a real sense of solidarity and confidence. This can only really come about through assemblies where those participating can discuss what is happening, what to do, and to make contacts.

We are not in the same situation as France, and it is certainly that the Left will be able to try and organise to take any demonstration or movement under their control. What we can do though is to try and offer a proletarian alternative, as a comrade says above. This is why we distributed a leaflet (http://en.internationalism.org/icconline/2010/10/student-demonstration at the organizing meeting. Such a leaflet is only one part of such a response, there also needs to be discussions about what can be done.

At the moment it is clear that there are dispersed and heterogeneous actions taking place. JK has referred to his local FE College, on the other hand I have heard from someone at Bristol Uni that there is nothing happening. This is not surprising given the lack of a consistent movement, the dispersed nature of the sector, and also the xmas holidays are fast approaching. But something is clearly moving, it is not just our understandable political desire for something to happen (well hopefully not!).

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shug
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Nov 19 2010 17:08

Let me see if I've got this right. A contribution to debate is now fecking spam is it?

dinosavros
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Nov 20 2010 00:53

Joseph Kay, yes I agree with you about black blocs.

More generally, thinking about this march being planned and how it could make or break follow up student actions, I am reminded of the EU Summit in Thessaloniki (Salonica) in 2003. There were very high expectations for summits at the time. But what happened was that the 2 black blocs moved through a pre-determined route, making it easy for the cops to plan a very effective counter strategy including blocking of side streets etc, and despite the fact that the anarchist bloc was huge, numbering in the thousands, the police broke us up and scattered us easily and of course the bloc didnt get near its goal. And that was the greek police which is not as efficient as the british one.

The psychological effect afterwards was very depressing for me, and many others I am sure, it took a while to get over.

The historical lesson being don't be predictable.

Maybe that is stating the obvious but maybe not.

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Red Marriott
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Nov 20 2010 01:35
Quote:
Thousands of schoolchildren and sixth formers are expected to take part in a national walkout on Wednesday as student protests over fees, which saw more than 50,000 people march in London last week, are stepped up across the country.
More than 16,000 young people have signed up to take part in the "day of action" and student leaders are predicting sit-ins, demonstrations and occupations in protest at plans to raise tuition fees and scrap the education maintenance allowance [EMA].
At the forefront of the demonstrations will be thousands of school and FE students – some as young as 15 – who have organised scores of walkouts across the country.
... "They are cutting the EMA and people are struggling enough already." said White. "This is a really big deal for a lot of working class students here and as soon as you mention it people get really concerned. It is the difference between whether they can get lunch or not, whether they are going to be able to afford the tube and get to college on time," she said.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2010/nov/19/students-school-pupils-protest
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cantdocartwheels
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Nov 20 2010 03:58

Perhaps we can learn from how badly the anti-war movement went and concentrate on building links between local groups and long term local campaigning rather than shitty formulaic a-b marches in central london.

Perhaps someone could stick something together based on the experiences of student walk outs during anti-war stuff. Fallback and caiman (i think) were involved a lot in that and there must be a few other people online who did stuff related to it.

Caiman del Barrio
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Nov 20 2010 11:13

Nice one Cantdo, volunteering others for work. Fallback and I are already struggling to match your Stankhanovite dedication to The Cause... wink

Links are starting to be made at local levels, at least where I'm close enough to watch. Doubtless 24th will be a washout (I'm worrying abotu what happens if it rains), but I understand the need for national coordinated action.

I think we need to consider tactics in order to access schoolchildren and 6th formers (wahey, wait till The Torygraph read this one wink ).

gypsy
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Nov 20 2010 11:56
Caiman del Barrio wrote:

I think we need to consider tactics in order to access schoolchildren and 6th formers (wahey, wait till The Torygraph read this one wink ).

Is there any chance there could be a private forum for vouched for members on here? Would make it harder for the torygraph etc.

ernie
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Nov 20 2010 12:12

Tommy Ascaso

I was not trying to spam. The aim of the link was to illustrate one of the possible ways in which it could be possible to try and encourage this movement. I deliberately did not put a link in the post starting this thread in order to avoid it looking like we were simply trying to advertise our own activity.

Whilst we are not in the same situation as the anti-CPE movement in 2006, it would be worth while seeking to find out more information on how links were built between the assemblies.

On nation wide coordination, this is problematic. At the moment the Left are the only ones with the ability to do this. There is not a wide spread movement to provide the means for the linking up of assemblies into a more national coordination. In fact, which a level of organisation would imply a far higher level of struggle than exists.

In the recent struggles in France, there was a minority movement for the formation of assemblies in different towns and even for the linking up of this on a local and regional level, but this was against a background of a mobilization of the class in France, based on a palpable anger against the attacks. This is not the situation in Britain at the moment.

Caiman and Cant point about local initiatives etc is probably the most likely development at the moment

Jason Cortez
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Nov 20 2010 12:49
ernie wrote:
From what we experienced at the 'organising meeting' on Monday it would seem that the Left is seeking to impose itself on what is not a clearly defined movement at the moment. One things is certain the Left and the state do not want a re-run of the last demonstration, by which I do not mean Millbank but the general expression of the will to struggle by thousands of young and not so young people. They want to corral it into their proposed delivering up of workers and students to the state, which is what a mach on Lib Dem HQ would amount to.

Roaming demonstrations with the aim of disrupting the capital doesn't really hold out any real focus or opportunity to use such a gathering of students and workers as a means for helping to develop a real sense of solidarity and confidence. This can only really come about through assemblies where those participating can discuss what is happening, what to do, and to make contacts.

We are not in the same situation as France, and it is certainly that the Left will be able to try and organise to take any demonstration or movement under their control. What we can do though is to try and offer a proletarian alternative, as a comrade says above. This is why we distributed a leaflet (http://en.internationalism.org/icconline/2010/10/student-demonstration at the organizing meeting. Such a leaflet is only one part of such a response, there also needs to be discussions about what can be done.

At the moment it is clear that there are dispersed and heterogeneous actions taking place. JK has referred to his local FE College, on the other hand I have heard from someone at Bristol Uni that there is nothing happening. This is not surprising given the lack of a consistent movement, the dispersed nature of the sector, and also the xmas holidays are fast approaching. But something is clearly moving, it is not just our understandable political desire for something to happen (well hopefully not!).

Frankly ernie I think you are fetishisizing the assembly form because public meetings, internet forums and handing out leaflets, is the whole of the ICC's interaction with the wider class. The assembly offers, for you the perfect form -radicalised workers, students etc- into which to inject your revolutionary content. Because for you people can't really develop their ideas through their own struggles beyond a certain limit, they need the demythifying cleaning power of ICC with added whiteness. You project the questions of organisation [form(s)] and politics [content] as reflections of your own group's practise.
As you yourself admit, there are not really any signs that assemblies are emerging from the struggle (beyond a public meeting or two being advertised as such, but have/are likely to be really forums for politicos) and they won't appear just because a isolated handful of left communists keep promoting them. If there is a wave of occupations and/or regular presence on the street through various mobilisations then the conditions will be there.

Your only action is to distribute leaflets and intervene at the 'organising' (or at least what you believe are these, hence your intervention at the EAN) because, well what else can you do, being so completely divorced in your practise from the living movements of people. So your participation will be limited to bemoaning your own limitations (dressed up in the language of these being those of the class) and the betrayal of the Left (despite your continual pointing out, that their behaviour is inevitable because they are the left wing of capital, your practtise dein's your theoretical sophication).

If you think that students and education workers assembling wink at Trafalgar Square want to stand around discussing 'politics' on the 24th you clearly clueless. The students want action, excitement and engagement not demobilisation into talking shops under the guise of them being a higher form of organistion. Many will want a replay of the 10th, whether that is experience of being with tens of thousands of other youth on the streets, wanting to cheer on and witness the destruction of LibDem HQ or a desire to participate in events. To feel themselves as part of the making of history. Whilst i share your concern that the 'siege' of the LibDem HQ will be an opportunity for the left to induct a whole swave of youth into the ritualised 'oppositional' set pieces of defeat. Where they will get to express their rage, but it will be found to be impotent against the organised power of the state on a pre-ordained battle ground. Their anger transformed into frustration, their power dissolved into humiliation through the police's use of the kettle and baton and the left's practise of staged symbolic protest as recruitment. Leaving these young students returning home demoralised and deflated. Confused why it was not what it promised to be, despite maybe moments where the rage burst the limits of compliant protest. Because there was not the joy of directing ones own actions in conjunction with thousands, of rendering the veil of normalcy
and the glimpsing of possible futures. But what do you offer? Discussion! Yes we need to discuss, to reflect but we need to act on the terrain of struggle to transform the conditions within which we act. It was the smashing of Millbank that changed these, it enabled the discussion to take place beyond the confines of politicial groups, it is still raging through society, ideas and people are in motion. It could all fizzle out very quickly
To end I will quote JK from another thread as i think it goes to the hear of the problem with the ICC's approach in many ways

JK wrote:
in some ways this is a rearticulation of the classical view of Direct Action (Pouget), although i draw different organisational conclusions to Pouget for a variety of reasons; essentially if people act for themselves in their own interests, they are driven to try and comprehend those actions and interests, which may lead to revolutionary ideas. action running ahead of consciousness which then seeks to make sense of it, as opposed to consciousness being delivered Blue Peter style as one prepared earlier by a vanguard party or would-be leadership of ideas. it's not to say i think political propaganda or arguments are always-already pointless, i spend considerable time doing them, but i think they have to be conceived as dialogue based on interest rather than simple dissemination of a line and the associated political practices; rhetoric, demagoguery etc.
Samotnaf
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Nov 20 2010 14:04

Totally agree with Jason Cortez's approach above. Though of course, as with everything, it depends on both the form and content of this dialogue.

Same with the project of linking General Assemblies, that the ICC talk about - are they going to co-ordinate the proletarian requisitioning of food, the distribution of arms, the simultaneous occupation of public and private institutions, the looting of Tescos in every town in the UK or what? If it's not a practical matter, then it's a bureaucratic one - loads of delegates delegated to delegate, or maybe they're delegated to discuss - but discussing what? International discussion of a sort already exists (eg on libcom) - so the real question is what theoretical practice and practical theory helps us towards our goals of the total reappropriation of the social product, the liberation of territory, the abolition of hierarchical social relations, etc etc.

But the ICC think that being applauded at a public meeting (see post 4 in this) is already something. A friend during the kids' walkout and demonstrations in Parliament square at the start of the Iraq war told me he surprised himself by getting onto some step ladder or something and making an impromptu speech in Parliament Square linking the refusal of classes with the refusal of class society , which was cheered by the schookids. This - in a situation of kids refusing school and having a tussle with the cops - is applause which has a bit more meaning, but a meeting in which almost everyone there is already on your side to a certain extent, being applauded, widely or not, is not really noteworthy.

gypseytimetraveller:

Quote:
Is there any chance there could be a private forum for vouched for members on here? Would make it harder for the torygraph etc.

Despite some people thinking that the State has major problems reading private messages etc. on the internet, discussions of practical matters seems too risky to take, assuming you want the action to have a fair chance of happening. Particularly now as the State will be doing everything in its power to make sure that things don't get out of hand. And though the State likes to present the image of its omnipotence, I find it hard to believe that when it comes to the internet they don't have the means to read everything they want to if they find out about it.

gypsy
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Nov 20 2010 15:27
Samotnaf wrote:
Totally agree with Jason Cortez's approach above. Though of course, as with everything, it depends on both the form and content of this dialogue.

Same with the project of linking General Assemblies, that the ICC talk about - are they going to co-ordinate the proletarian requisitioning of food, the distribution of arms, the simultaneous occupation of public and private institutions, the looting of Tescos in every town in the UK or what? If it's not a practical matter, then it's a bureaucratic one - loads of delegates delegated to delegate, or maybe they're delegated to discuss - but discussing what? International discussion of a sort already exists (eg on libcom) - so the real question is what theoretical practice and practical theory helps us towards our goals of the total reappropriation of the social product, the liberation of territory, the abolition of hierarchical social relations, etc etc.

But the ICC think that being applauded at a public meeting (see post 4 in this) is already something. A friend during the kids' walkout and demonstrations in Parliament square at the start of the Iraq war told me he surprised himself by getting onto some step ladder or something and making an impromptu speech in Parliament Square linking the refusal of classes with the refusal of class society , which was cheered by the schookids. This - in a situation of kids refusing school and having a tussle with the cops - is applause which has a bit more meaning, but a meeting in which almost everyone there is already on your side to a certain extent, being applauded, widely or not, is not really noteworthy.

Despite some people thinking that the State has major problems reading private messages etc. on the internet, discussions of practical matters seems too risky to take, assuming you want the action to have a fair chance of happening. Particularly now as the State will be doing everything in its power to make sure that things don't get out of hand. And though the State likes to present the image of its omnipotence, I find it hard to believe that when it comes to the internet they don't have the means to read everything they want to if they find out about it.

I agree sam. Although it would make it alot harder for the media to know about certain things that we want to keep in house or within our group.

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miles
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Nov 20 2010 15:40

JC

After wading through the, frankly, dross of your last post, this seems to be the core argument you're putting across:

Quote:
Yes we need to discuss, to reflect but we need to act on the terrain of struggle to transform the conditions within which we act. It was the smashing of Millbank that changed these, it enabled the discussion to take place beyond the confines of politicial groups, it is still raging through society, ideas and people are in motion. It could all fizzle out very quickly

Maybe I'm just thick, but after "critiquing" the ICC the best you come up is - the idea that political discussion exists, as do political movements, independently of 'politicos'.

Well done. Genuine question - do you have anything more to say than that? Because in truth many leftists I know are already salivating at the prospect of this generations 'Poll Tax revolt'.

Lurch
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Nov 20 2010 17:57

Just because a member of the ICC raised this discussion, it doesn’t follow that it should be about the ICC. This is about the NUS-called demos – not just in London, though it’s obviously an important focus - on the 24th.

Jason Cortez wrote

Quote:
“Whilst i share your concern that the 'siege' of the LibDem HQ will be an opportunity for the left to induct a whole swave of youth into the ritualised 'oppositional' set pieces of defeat. Where they will get to express their rage, but it will be found to be impotent against the organised power of the state on a pre-ordained battle ground. Their anger transformed into frustration, their power dissolved into humiliation through the police's use of the kettle and baton and the left's practise of staged symbolic protest as recruitment. Leaving these young students returning home demoralised and deflated.”

OK, concretely, what do ‘we’ (presuming there is a ‘we’) at least attempt to do about this? Isn’t that what this discussion (forgive me for ‘fetishising’ discussion) is about?

Jason Cortez wrote:

Quote:
“As you yourself admit, there are not really any signs that assemblies are emerging from the struggle (beyond a public meeting or two being advertised as such, but have/are likely to be really forums for politicos) and they won't appear just because a isolated handful of left communists keep promoting them. If there is a wave of occupations and/or regular presence on the street through various mobilisations then the conditions will be there.

I don’t know about a ‘wave’ of occupations’, but occupations are indeed already occurring. So are regular strikes and, obviously, street protests. The conditions – including real attacks on jobs, education, standards of living, so-called ‘welfare’ payments’ - are already there.

Jason Cortez wrote:

Quote:
“The students want action, excitement and engagement not demobilisation into talking shops under the guise of them being a higher form of organistion. Many will want a replay of the 10th, whether that is experience of being with tens of thousands of other youth on the streets, wanting to cheer on and witness the destruction of LibDem HQ or a desire to participate in events. To feel themselves as part of the making of history.”

You know what ‘the students’ want? OK. On one level, I agree. Hopefully they’ll get the collective feeling of making history, of participating, of transforming – some of them for the first time. But you, yourself, feel the framework is distorted; that the ‘attack’ on Liberal HQ could be a trap (I agree on that). Sorry chum, but you have a ‘political view’ of what’s going on. But to at least try and make that view known to others? That would make you just a ‘politico’!! God forbid!

So why, in the forthcoming demos, amongst and not excluding other actions, is taking time out to discuss where we are, and what we should do next, necessarily ‘demoblisation’? And, what better opportunity when there are actually people gathered together, rather than individualised on the interwebby? Not only at the beginning, but during, and at the end?

And, I’m sure you’ll also agree, this isn’t just about ‘students’: apart from their ‘teachers’, caretakers, cleaners, college admin folk, etc, it’s also about everybody else under attack.

So maybe one concrete proposal is for the chant-leaflet-poster-placard-banner: ‘Join us – we’re all under attack’ It had an effect when I was working in a 4th floor office in central London during an 80s demo. Sorry not to come up with a ‘more radical’ suggestion, but size matters, as does including other members of the working class.

I also agree that a call to occupy student premises (and not just student premises – we’ve already had Visteon) - is valid in the current situation: so there’s another ‘concrete’ suggestion to put forward. Unless you consider that too ‘political’ or ‘substitutionist’?

Irrespective of what you, I (or the ICC) think, these demos on the 24th are going ahead. Does ‘Libcom central’ have anything to say to the movement?

Samotnaf wrote:

Quote:
“Totally agree with Jason Cortez's approach above.”

Of course you do, dear. So blind are you to what’s actually going on; so keen are you to agree with any badmouthing of the ICC; so bereft, our ‘resident expert’ on France, to even venture a constructive opinion on how to collectively approach next week’s GB demos...

Don’t you just love the smell of opportunism in the morning, of ‘political pacifism’?

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Nov 20 2010 21:14

Interesting article in todays Guardian, here

Quote:
More than 16,000 young people have signed up to take part in the "day of action" and student leaders are predicting sit-ins, demonstrations and occupations in protest at plans to raise tuition fees and scrap the education maintenance allowance [EMA].

EMA is one of the things that hasn't really come up very much in the media, as the focus has tended to be on University fees. That's going to hit the poorest students hard, a potential loss of £120 a month. In fact, if I'm not mistaken, this cut is coming in before the fees increrase, starting next September.

Also interesting:

Quote:
A delegation of students from Westminster Kingsway further education college in London approached activists at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) .
Ellen White, 18, studying sociology and history A level at Westminster Kingsway, said there was growing anger over the government's plan to axe the education maintenance allowance – the means-tested benefit for people in post-16 education.
Yorkie Bar
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Nov 20 2010 21:30

arguing with the icc is just about the least productive thing i can imagine anyone doing on this thread at this point

princess mob
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Nov 20 2010 21:49
ernie wrote:
on the other hand I have heard from someone at Bristol Uni that there is nothing happening.

Students from UWE in Bristol are planning a week of actions from Monday including mobilising for the Wednesday walk-out. There's also some people organising at Bristol Uni & talking with college students. As for what it'll all look like here in terms of size & policing I really don't know...

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Nov 20 2010 23:03

From what I've seen there's a lot of local actions being planned. The Oxford Education Campaign has posters up all over the shop. Plans for the 24th don't seem to be isolated, but instead seem to be placed in a wider context of local activism which has apparently seen a sudden surge.

I agree with what JK said earlier. It certainly feels like there's *something* in the air at the moment... though like him I'm unsure if it's just political wishful thinking on my part.

The cynic in me thinks that a lot of the individual actions on the day will be pretty pedestrian (which is fair enough, not many students are 'radicals'). Yet on the other hand it does seem as if the action is going to be pretty widespread and involve a large number of people across the nation. To my mind, all it takes is for one local group to do something dramatic and things could suddenly look very different.

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Nov 21 2010 07:28

As long as local groups are aware what other local groups are doing thats a start. Having somewhere online where you can see a list of local student demos and actions would be good,* i assume such a blog might exist already?

*you can probably see a lot of them on indymedia no doubt, but inevitably they'd be mixed in with all mannner of nonsense as we found when we did anti-war stuff

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Nov 21 2010 10:35

Well it seems like social media (Facebook, Twitter etc) is definitely having an effect. There is now a near-constant cross promotion of events on the various pages. As well as the trolling of wealthy, right wing students who just seem to be whipping things up even more. I'm also noticing that schools seem to be getting involved.

I spoke to a friend of mine today who is studying at Goldsmiths, and he says things are 'erupting' there at the moment and that there's a real atmosphere about the place. He's usually a lot more pessimistic about politics than I am, so who knows - maybe something is happening.

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Nov 21 2010 11:57

one thing which would be really useful is that we will have a news article about this on the day - it would be great if people could post on it with what is going on in the area. If you are directly involved even better, but even if you have to be at work, if you could find out what is going on in your area and post it as a comment that would be great

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Nov 21 2010 12:28

Well I'm working that day, but I'm planning to head down at lunch to see what's happening and can post an update when I get back to the office. The facebook group currently has an attendance of almost 250 so it'll definitely be noticed.

mons
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Nov 21 2010 14:03

Yeah scrapping EMA is really shit. I was totally dependent on it.

I think the Oxford one will be much bigger than 250, and involves students and workers from 5 (that I know of) different education places. Meetings of over 100 have had a militant pro-direct action feel to them, and no leftist influence as far I can see. Also the education campaign has been backing other non-education based anti-cuts stuff, which is promising. I will also be writing something on that.

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Nov 21 2010 16:24
mons wrote:
Yeah scrapping EMA is really shit. I was totally dependent on it.

I think the Oxford one will be much bigger than 250, and involves students and workers from 5 (that I know of) different education places. Meetings of over 100 have had a militant pro-direct action feel to them, and no leftist influence as far I can see. Also the education campaign has been backing other non-education based anti-cuts stuff, which is promising. I will also be writing something on that.

Yeah, 250 was just the attendance on the FB group, so that's obviously a minimum. I saw quite a lot of posters in town today as well as graffitti calling for occupation ('OCCUPY... My favourite kind of pie!').

Now that my current round of crunch time is over, I'll hopefully be able to get more involved with things myself.

princess mob
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Joined: 26-01-07
Nov 21 2010 18:10
cantdocartwheels wrote:
Having somewhere online where you can see a list of local student demos and actions would be good,* i assume such a blog might exist already?

Has this been posted yet? It has a lot of local listings.