Behaviour contracts for students

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the button's picture
the button
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Apr 21 2006 11:35
Behaviour contracts for students

This is being floated at Goldsmiths -- getting the students to sign up to a (binding) contract about how they'll conduct themselves in lectures & seminars, addressing issues like racism, sexism, etc.

Is it just Goldsmiths, or is this part of a wider trend across higher education?

JoeMaguire's picture
JoeMaguire
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Apr 21 2006 11:54

Contracts Im not sure about, but there is something of an agreement, which makes education sound more and more business orientated. I think its really used as a get out clause in case students try and put complaints against the institution.

ftony
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Apr 21 2006 12:33

on a slightly different note i've heard about contracts on attendance being put into force at oxford i think

not heard anything about conduct anywhere though. have you read the proposed contract?

the button's picture
the button
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Apr 21 2006 12:36
ftony wrote:
have you read the proposed contract?

Nope. I think the plan is to introduce it for the next intake of undergraduates. Then again, it'll probably come to nothing, given the dizzying pace & efficiency with which Goldsmiths operates.

Steve
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Apr 21 2006 12:48

It is becoming more of a customer/service provider relationship in higher education now. Some students are demanding more contact time, actual teaching hours. The old method was that you had a lecture/tutorial and then were expected to do independent research. Now it seems some students want to be given the 'facts' to get a pass and little else.

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the button
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Apr 21 2006 12:50
Steve wrote:
It is becoming more of a customer/service provider relationship in higher education now. Some students are demanding more contact time, actual teaching hours.

.... and wanting contact time when they want it, rather than during "office hours."[/young people today]

Mike Harman
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Apr 22 2006 08:19

This happens loads in FE/6th Form - easy to do with either immigration visa or EMA requirements on attendance/punctuality rather than over the whole college.

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sam sanchez
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Apr 22 2006 12:57

We had it at my secondary school. Talk about gun to your head. Agree to policies you have no say in making or you won't get an education.

Is there anything we can do about it as a network?

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JDMF
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Apr 23 2006 10:09
sam_frances wrote:
Is there anything we can do about it as a network?

could start by collecting some information about this and writing it up to an article format? The stuff that you and catch mention would be good examples of different uses of these contracts.

Have to say this is the first time i've heard of these...

Mike Harman
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Apr 23 2006 10:13

EMA:

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/financialhelp/ema/index.cfm?SectionID=1

Quote:
"Let me get this straight - all I have to do is turn up and sign the attendance register to get my money"

Not necessarily - you'll also have to display progress and commitment to your learning programme as well as attendance. Young people who receive EMA have to sign an EMA Contract with their school, college or provider. This sets out the terms and conditions you have to follow to receive your weekly payment and bonuses.

"What's the point - even if I'm able to apply, I'll only get an extra £10 every week"

Not necessarily. EMA comes in weekly payments of £10, £20 or £30 per week, depending on your household income. Plus you can get periodic bonuses of £100 if you knuckle down and show some commitment to your learning programme. Either way, you're getting paid for learning, and that's got to be good news if you're a learner short on cash.