Corbyn: a new theory

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jc
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Joined: 23-12-13
Sep 22 2017 14:42
Corbyn: a new theory

First post on my new blog - would be great to hear any criticism or comments! The idea is that Corbyn is Labour leader because of tensions between trade union executives and the rest of the ruling class, instead of a new leftwing grassroots movement (like most of the Left seems to think).

https://theotherleft.noblogs.org/post/2017/09/22/corbyn-a-new-theory/

I'm still working out the style, etc so any suggestions there would help too.

Thanks,
JC

Who PhD
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Joined: 1-05-17
Oct 3 2017 09:06

Does it matter?

If we don't vote him in, whether we like it or not, the alternative will be much worse, and until the capitalist system is dismantled that alternative will have power over us.

Anarchism is attractive, but nowhere near likely to manifest in the near future. Certainly not in this election cycle

mn8
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Oct 12 2017 18:54

The 'New' Labour Party was an important compromise, so it wasn't likely to break without interference from elsewhere.. Corbyn's movement has allowed radical trends, unlike New Labour which just ought to manage them.

While itt may be that Corbyn reflects a similar conflict, they have also co-existed with giving space to radical movements. This is important to them! Hence even if they started as managing and overlooking working class they have intersect with new radical movements. They aren't all 'grassroot,' of course, it is the Labor Party!

jc
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Oct 18 2017 11:49

Does it matter? Yes, but not directly - it's a theory article not a call to action. It's a starting point to build up a good plan for how to interact with Corbyn's labour and the people getting involved.

> If we don't vote him in...

The article doesn't tell people how to vote.

But your response begs a lot of questions.

First off who's the "we"? The tiny minority of people on this website? The people who will read that blog? All libertarian socialists? The numbers of all those groups are too small to influence any election. So any question of voting is totally irrelevant.

Between us we've probably not even got the free time to make an impact on other voters through canvassing and campaigning either. It's only when we take action that isn't open to law-abiding party campaigners that we will even be noticed at all. Grassroots organising at work is one way, direct action is another.

Second off, you're assuming the only way to influence an election is voting. Bakunin's theory was that the ruling party is determined by the balance of forces on the ground. That is - IF working class unions are strong, THEN you get more socialist policies. In this case, that means probably Corbyn.

Even if you want to Corbyn to be in charge that doesn't imply you have to vote! If Bakunin's idea is correct, you simply have to organise.

This is what the article said at the end:

> The most important way to support Corbyn’s policies isn’t to vote or join the Labour party, because without a grassroots movement from outside parliament it will be impossible for him to fullfill all his promises. Instead of joining the party we should be joining unions, organising protests and action, fighting the cuts.

jc
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Oct 18 2017 11:51
mn8 wrote:
Corbyn's movement has allowed radical trends, unlike New Labour which just ought to manage them.

While itt may be that Corbyn reflects a similar conflict, they have also co-existed with giving space to radical movements.

Which radical trends exactly? How have they helped radical movements?