History

The last words of Eugen Leviné

Eugen_Levine

Eugen Leviné (1883 – 1919) was one of the leaders of the short-lived Bavarian Council Republic and a member of the Communist Party of Germany. Along with hundreds of other workers, communists, socialists and anarchists, he was arrested following the attack on Munich by the German Army and the Freikorps, and later executed. In June 1919, while on trial for high treason, Leviné made his last speech.

The workers' movement in Africa

"Africa" in the media is generally synonymous with catastrophes, wars and permanent massacres, famine, incurable sicknesses, corrupt governments; in brief, endless absolute misery. The workers' movement is assumed either not to have existed at all, or to have been a mere appendage of the "anti-colonial" struggle for "national liberation". This series of articles, concentrating particularly on Senegal and South Africa, aims to set the record straight.

The Princetown escapee

A short account of the case of Scots anarchist John Kerr, war resister

The downing of Iran Air 655

A look at the shooting down of Iran Air 655, a commercial airline flight shot down by the US Navy killing all 290 people on board.

Building a community: construction workers in Stevenage 1950-1970

Construction workers in Stevenage

Interesting pamphlet about the workers who built the new town of Stevenage, commissioned by the government in 1946. Constructed from interviews with the workers themselves, they discuss their disputes with the employers and their building of a community.

Battles on the Barbican: the struggle for trade unionism in the British building industry, 1965–7 - Charlie McGuire, Linda Clarke and Christine Wall

Construction workers at the Barbican. Photograph by John Steeden.

History of the industrial disputes and workers' struggles on the Barbican construction site 1965-1967.

Building the Barbican 1962-1982: taking the industry out of the dark ages

Workers on the Barbican site, 1965

Fantastic pamphlet on the workers' struggles during the construction of the brutalist masterpiece the Barbican in central London. Told largely in the words of the workers themselves.

Building Utopia: The Spanish Revolution 1936-1937 by Stuart Christie

Within the Spanish anarchist and anarcho-syndicalist movements there were three distinct points of view on the question of war and revolution. The first, probably the majority view, was that the war would be over in a matter of weeks, after all, a few days had been enough to rout the army in Barcelona and other industrial centres, and that the social revolution and Libertarian Communism as debated and adopted by the CNT’s national congress at Zaragoza in February, five months previously, was an inseparable aspect of the struggle against economic and social oppression.

The Revolution Without Specificity; A Critique of Anarchism Without Adjectives

A critique of AWA as non-specific sectarianism by Rage Against Capital

Damn his charity, we'll have the cheese for naught! Nottingham's great cheese riot and other 1766 food riots - Valentine Yarnspinner

Illustration of a protest to reduce the price of grain

Superb pamphlet by Valentine Yarnspinner published by the People's Histreh group about a cheese riot in Nottingham in 1766, and other food riots of the time.