1975 Tacoma-Olympia IWW outreach foldover

1975 Tacoma-Olympia IWW outreach foldover

Published by the Tacoma-Olympia Industrial Workers of the World, November 1975

IWW Branch information out reach to Tacoma-Olympia, Washington (USA) area union workers on the not taking their right to strike, right to vote on contracts, attend union meetings for granted.

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Comments

fnbrilll
Oct 26 2016 07:08

Likely Ottilie Markholt's work.

An obituary

syndicalist
Oct 26 2016 11:22
fnbrilll wrote:
Likely Ottilie Markholt's work.

An obituary

I figured as such

drakeberkman
Oct 30 2016 04:29

Really interesting little flyer to read, especially since I'm living in Olympia and currently looking for a job in the Port of Tacoma. It's also interesting to come across this since it further uncovers the history of the IWW in the 1970s. By that I mean in most cases it seem like the IWW existed as a dual organization for libertarian socialist union members to congregate in and demand democracy in their representative unions.

At least that seems to have been the most active segment of the membership at that time. Even in Chicago around this time when IWW members set out to establish an industrial union in the 50 or so machine shops in Southside, they apparently all could only find work in the few shops that were already union. ironically.

fnbrilll
Oct 30 2016 05:54

there's a bunch of material on Libcom which deals with the IWW in the 1970s era.

I would suggest looking at Ottile Markholt's book on the West Coast Maritime Industry if you're interested in port work.

syndicalist
Oct 31 2016 14:20
drakeberkman wrote:
Really interesting little flyer to read, especially since I'm living in Olympia and currently looking for a job in the Port of Tacoma. It's also interesting to come across this since it further uncovers the history of the IWW in the 1970s. By that I mean in most cases it seem like the IWW existed as a dual organization for libertarian socialist union members to congregate in and demand democracy in their representative unions.

At least that seems to have been the most active segment of the membership at that time. Even in Chicago around this time when IWW members set out to establish an industrial union in the 50 or so machine shops in Southside, they apparently all could only find work in the few shops that were already union. ironically.

At some point I'd like to come back to this. I think the Tacoma-Olympia leaflet was more a reflection of the views of the writers than the IWW.

My 1970s and 1980s IWW experiences with dual carding and reactions to those of us being dual card members have left me with a bad taste in my mouth. And have left me with a certain less than enthusiasm for the IWW in general (although I think there are decent folks in the IWW and will support it on principle)