Collection of the translated writings of Amadeo Bordiga

Collection of the translated writings of Amadeo Bordiga

This is a collection of, to my knowledge, all the translated writings of Amadeo Bordiga. Spanning from 1912 to 1965, this collection features every topic from the nature of the USSR, the role of the communist party, and the dictatorship of the proletariat.

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The Amadeo Bordiga Collection.pdf4.38 MB

Comments

Anarcho
Dec 11 2017 11:17

I guess we can now look forward to such "libertarians" as Stalin, Mao, Lenin, Trotsky, etc. appearing on libcom?

Seriously, why if this nonsense being posted onto a libertarian website? Bordiga was an authoritarian and his so-called "communist" ideas are as centralised as any state-capitalist regime.

Ed
Dec 11 2017 14:25
Anarcho wrote:
I guess we can now look forward to such "libertarians" as Stalin, Mao, Lenin, Trotsky, etc. appearing on libcom?

Seriously, why if this nonsense being posted onto a libertarian website? Bordiga was an authoritarian and his so-called "communist" ideas are as centralised as any state-capitalist regime.

Hey, so Anarcho, you've already been told this in the past but libcom isn't just a repository for texts from the anarchist tradition but texts which have some historical or theoretical relevance to radical workers. So texts on libcom aren't so much 'who has great politics?' but rather 'who would be useful for radical workers to have some kind of critical engagement with?' So, as much as I might share your opinions on Bordiga (which I do, btw), he undoubtedly has a place within that critical engagement, as he's an important point of reference for many left communists (who again we might have differences with but nonetheless are part of the broad 'ultra-left' milieu).

As an aside though, a lot (all?) of your recent posts have been almost c&ps of the same thing ('why is this on libcom?') with little/no specific relevance to the article in question. I think that's shitty behaviour to users who are taking time out of their day to make radical texts available (sometimes translating 1000s of words) for no reward at all. We get you don't like Bordiga (we even share a lot of your criticisms), you've let it be known multiple times now across various article. But if you keep posting the same thing with such little engagement with the article you're responding to then that is getting on to be trolling and we'll just remove those comments in future.

Now, you might feel like we don't have enough critiques of Bordiga (having checked quickly I actually don't think we have any!), but we would welcome them. And if you wanted to add more anarchist/libertarian stuff to balance out the Bordigist stuff (though tbh I don't think we even have that much Bordigist stuff anyway) then we'd be really pleased to host it. We'd also love to host your own writing, if you fancied, as in general we're big fans and that would certainly help tip the scales (further) in favour of anarchist writing on the site.

Mike Harman
Dec 11 2017 20:27
Ed wrote:
Now, you might feel like we don't have enough critiques of Bordiga (having checked quickly I actually don't think we have any!), but we would welcome them.

Just skimmed it now and http://libcom.org/library/bordiga-versus-pannekoek looks like it, or at least a critical comparison with Pannekoek.

bordiga-awakened
Dec 23 2017 06:21

Anarcho, if you read Bordiga you'd know the problem with the USSR and other capitalist countries (the term state capitalist is redundant) wasn't their form (centralised or decentralised, democratic or un-democratic), but that the law of value and commodity production continued to operate in them. While I appreciate that as an Anarchist you're not going to particularly like Bordiga or the broader tradition of the Italian Left I do think you could keep a more open mind, Bordiga produced a lot of work and I'm sure if you dug through it you'd find things you could appreciate in spite of your broader theoretical differences.