army

The quiet mutiny (documentary)

John Pilger’s controversial first documentary film created a sensation when it broke the story of a rebellion emerging within the American army fighting the War in Vietnam. Changing public and media perception of the war, The Quiet Mutiny contributed to the withdrawal of US troops from the region.

In this, the first of his 58 documentary films, John Pilger combines candid interviews and amazing frontline footage of Vietnam to portray a growing rift between the US military bureaucrats - "lifers" - and the soldiers who physically and mentally fight the war on the ground, the "grunts". By 1970, it is an internal sense of disillusionment and frustration born from this rift that is triggering the withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

As the US employs psychological warfare against its enemy, Pilger finds himself unable to glean significant information from the military; a press conference he attends is nicknamed "the 5 o'clock follies" for the evasive nature of the proceedings. And so it is with the grunts, the "wheels of the green machine", that Pilger finds a very human side to the US presence in Vietnam: soldiers who are at once ready to serve their country and doubtful of their purpose there. Plied with visits from Miss America and ignored by Vice President Spiro Agnew, they experience the war in a way many of their superiors do not.

Review via - http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/quiet.html

Government to use scab drivers and the police to break fuel strike

Tanker drivers in the UK have voted in favour of strike action over health and safety standards. The strikes are expected to take place over the Easter Holiday period to cause maximum disruption. The government has trained 300 soldiers to take over the duties of striking drivers and has vowed to use the police to prevent any 'irresponsible' picketing.

This week, tanker drivers in the UK have voted in favour of strike action over health and safety concerns. The 2,000 drivers balloted are responsible for around 90% of the fuel delivered to petrol stations in the UK.

Two FSAO Members share their experience as war resistors on active military duty

A brief account of soldiers affiliated to Chicago's Four Star Anarchist Organization attempts to organize within the military and avoid being shipped off to Iraq and Afghanistan.

Recently, two members of FSAO were interviewed and published describing their experiences as war resistors on active military duty at Ft. Polk Lousiana 2004-2005.

The interview was published at Truthout:

GI Resistance Under the Radar

Bloody Sunday (Film)

This week marks the 40th anniversary of 'bloody sunday', when during a civil rights march in Derry, British soldiers opened fire on demonstrators killing thirteen people. Here is the acclaimed 2002 dramatisation of events, starring James Nesbitt. I have not attempted to discuss the events of the day as I could not possibly do them justice. However, if anyone knows of any good texts, please post them.

Bloody Sunday is a 2002 film about the 1972 "Bloody Sunday" shootings in Derry, Northern Ireland. Although produced by Granada Television as a TV film, it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on 16 January, a few days before its screening on ITV on 20 January, and then in selected London cinemas from 25 January. The production was written and directed by Paul Greengrass.

Stealing a Nation (Documentary)

'Stealing A Nation' (2004) is an extraordinary film about the plight of the Chagos Islands, whose indigenous population was secretly and brutally expelled by British Governments in the late 1960s and early 1970s to make way for an American military base. The tragedy, which falls within the remit of the International Criminal Court as "a crime against humanity", is told by Islanders who were dumped in the slums of Mauritius and by British officials who left behind a damning trail of Foreign Office documents.

Before the Americans came, more than 2,000 people lived on the islands in the Indian Ocean, many with roots back to the late 18th century. There were thriving villages, a school, a hospital, a church, a railway and an undisturbed way of life. The islands were, and still are, a British crown colony.

Winston Churchill and the "Second Front": A Reappraisal - Tuvia Ben-Moshe

This article shows how Churchill's war strategy was determined by British soldiers' reluctance to fight another bloody world war.

Egyptian military tortured, “disappeared” thousands of demonstrators

Now that the wave of riots, demonstrations and strikes has toppled Mubarak and the military has taken over, this report examines the supposedly "neutral" role of the military so far.

Since demonstrations and strikes erupted against the Mubarak regime on January 25, the Egyptian military has arrested, tortured and “disappeared” thousands, according to reports from the Guardian newspaper and human rights organizations.

Second guessing the army

A sole military checkpoint was set up on the Western side of Qasr el Nile bridge on Friday. On Saturday, this checkpoint became considerably more hostile, with aggressive soldiers attempting to confiscate my camera and succeeding in confiscating my lighter. I was told I could claim it back at the end of the day. I didn’t try to exercise that right.

Then the primary checkpoint, at the entrance to Tahrir, was a disorganized nightmare. Queues for the men and women were combined, barbed wire was erected, the crowd was kept waiting, growing frustrated. Foreigners living in Cairo were not allowed in. Swaggering officers now checked IDs, a job previously performed by civilians.

Radicalizing the armed forces - Federico Campagna

Noam Chomsky once said that engaging in armed confrontation with the State is a suicide attempt, as "if you come with a rifle, they will come back with a tank, if you come with a tank, they will come back with a fighter jet." However, who exactly are "they"?

source: Through Europe