art

The Mexican Suitcase

A treasure trove...

In Madrid I happened upon a unique collection in the annals of Spanish Civil War. Robert Capa considered a pioneer of photojournalism provided the iconic Falling Soldier image. Negatives of his, David Chim and Gerda Taro were thought lost when Capa fled Paris in 1940. The collection formed a heavily circulated body of work sympathetic to the Republic. The collection of 4,500 fortunately resurfaced in 2007 in Mexico and until September 2012, part of the La Maleta Mexicana collection - Círculo de Bellas Artes. Unfortunately, my camera is limited, but hopefully it gives a flavour of the collection.

Political graffiti in Milan photo gallery, 2012

Photo gallery of radical, left-wing and anti-fascist graffiti around Milan in 2012.

Art of Carlos Cortez

Some images of the art of Carlos Cortez, a long time member of the IWW and anarcho-syndicalist who died in 2005.

Towards a futurology of the present - Marco Cuevas-Hewitt

Marco Cuevas-Hewitt outlines an emerging practice amongst radical writers; one entailing an attentiveness to intimations of alternative futures arising in the present. This "futurology of the present", as he calls it, represents a significant break with the hackneyed jeremiads and manifestos of earlier political generations, which limit themselves either to a simple negation of the present or to the authoritarian prescription of an idealised future. Delving into questions around the role of artists and writers in social movements and wider society, Cuevas-Hewitt's goal is a re-imagining of radical politics and a re-tooling of radical writerly practice.

‘Tomorrow never happens, man’ – Janis Joplin[1]

Another World - Michelle Kuo talks with David Graeber

David Graeber talks with the Editor-in-Chief of Artforum about philosophy, totalities, insurrectionism, baseline communism, and his book Debt.

MICHELLE KUO: Many artists and critics have been reading your work on everything from the long history of debt, to anarchism, to culture as “creative refusal.” That interest seems to be a reflection of how the art world, at this moment, sees itself in parallel to politics and economics.

Libertarian communism and the transitional regime - Christiaan Cornelissen

This 1931 text by the Dutch anarchosyndicalist Christiaan Cornelissen, who in 1916 was a signatory of the pro-war Manifesto of the Sixteen, argues against the possibility of the direct implementation of communist policies after the revolution and for the persistence of money, “government”, police and prisons during a transitional period that will only gradually overcome the baneful legacy of capitalism, and calls upon the trade unions to cultivate a technocratic leadership cadre to direct high level strategic planning by financial-industrial socialist trusts, and thus prepare humanity and the economy for communism. We do not agree with this article but reproduce for reference.

Libertarian Communism and the Transitional Regime – Christiaan Cornelissen

Author’s Preface

Before outlining the basic features of a libertarian communist economy in the pages that follow, it is important to bring to the reader’s attention all the difficulties that will confront anyone who attempts such a labor.

Gerd Arntz illustrations

A collection of working class and other assorted illustrations by German council communist artist Gerd Arntz.

The avatars of culture as commodity - Miguel Amoros

A situationist-inspired summary of the history and meaning of culture, from its origins as the privilege of leisured classes in ancient societies to its takeover by the bourgeoisie in the 19th century and its subsequent decline as today’s “mass culture” of “entertainment”, which the author claims is subordinated to the logic of the commodity economy and is therefore a “bureaucratic and industrial substitute”, “decontextualized and stripped of historical perspective” and intended for the consumption of a “passive”, “childlike” “spectator public”.

The Avatars of Culture as Commodity – Miguel Amorós

The Sadness of Post-Workerism

David Graeber.

David Graber provides an overview and critique of the 'Art and Immaterial Labour' Conference that took place at the Tate Britain in January 2008. Contributors included Antonio Negri, Bifo Berardi, Maurizio Lazzarato, and Judith Revel.

Art and revolt - Fernand Pelloutier

Text of a speech delivered on behalf of the group, Arte Social, in Paris in 1896, in which one of the founders of French revolutionary syndicalism expresses his views on art and revolution, discusses the decadence of bourgeois morality and illustrates its deleterious effects on the morale of the working class by means of colorful anecdotes drawn from contemporary newspaper reports, and proclaims that "the goal of revolutionary art" is to "remove the veil from social lies".

Art and Revolt – Fernand Pelloutier