art

Michaelis, Margaret born Margaret Gross, 1902-1985

A short biography of modernist photographer and anarchist Margaret Michaelis 1902-1985.

The ‘G’ Word - review

Tom Jennings' review of the graffiti art show at the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead.

Bring the war to the streets - AYN art

Phone box

Photographs of an anti-Iraq war art project carried out by some people involved in the Anarchist Youth Network in 2002 and 2003. Most may not believe now that it was very politically useful but it is archived here for reference. The concept of it was threefold: to put military imagery into peaceful London settings, to illustrate that the British government going to war in Iraq would likely bring conflict to the UK in terms of terrorism and as a call to action, to bring a war against the war-mongering capitalist system to the streets of the UK. It involved sticking toy soldiers about the place, and camouflaging everyday objects about the city with paint.

National Gallery wardens strike as Velázquez exhibition opens

140 wardens at the National Gallery, London, are on strike today over changes to their holiday entitlement.

Pissarro, Camille, 1830-1903

Haymakers Resting, 1891 (210 Kb); Oil on canvas, 65.4 x 81.3 cm (25 3/4 x 32 in); McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, TX

A short biography of French Impressionist artist and anarchist Camille Pisarro.

Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970

A short biography of Latvian-born abstract expressionist artist and anarchist, Mark Rothko.

Signac, Paul, 1863-1935

A short biography of Paul Signac a French neo-impressionist painter and anarchist who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the pointillist style.

The cultural Cold War: corporate and state intervention in the arts - Mike Harman

Number 8 by Jackson Pollock.

A look at involvement of governments and corporations attempting to push their interests in the world of art and culture since the middle of the last century.

A short history of radical puppetry - Kerry Mogg

Anti-WTO demonstrator, 1999

A short history of puppets, puppeteers and working class politics from the English Civil War to the streets of Seattle in 1999.

The Revolution of Modern Art and the Modern Art of Revolution (Clark, Gray, Nicholson-Smith, Radcliffe & others, 1967)

A situationist-influenced critique of modern art by some UK radicals in the days of 1967 when, for many, revolution seemed to be getting close. Despite the occasional silly over-estimation of delinquency and shop-lifting, still a fine critique of its time of art and its limits.