A brief explanation of the concept of territory and its implications - Miquel Amorós

An explanation of the meaning of “territory”, illustrated in its historical, social, economic and political context from the times of Cleisthenes to today’s pathological “anti-cities” and mutilated rural areas, as the dynamic unity of humanity as transformative agent and nature as abstract totality, and its significance for the “anti-developmentalist critique” that seeks to reunify the these two aspects of the world in a two-pronged struggle to restore the emancipatory nature of the city (the agora, “city air makes one free”) and the salutary aspects of rural life (the commons, etc.), a struggle that goes by the name of “territorial defense”, the pivot of the modern social revolution.

State and Capital

Excerpts about the relationship between the state and capitalism from Michael Heinrich’s recent book, An Introduction to the Three Volumes of Karl Marx’s Capital.

Co-ops or workers' revolution?

An article by Tom Wetzel (under a pseudonym) which lays out the limitations of cooperatives as an alternative to capitalism.

American labor: new beginning

The U.S based group, Unity & Struggle's first political document from 2009, analyzing the situation as they see it.

The new historical simultaneity - Robert Kurz

In this 2004 article, Robert Kurz discusses the condition of “simultaneity” caused by the concluding phase of the discontinuous “catch-up modernization” of the world’s nations that culminated in “the constitution of the transnational structures of capital” in which the traditional workers movement and leftist politics, inseparable from the national form of capitalism and its “Enlightenment ideology”, have been rendered obsolete and ineffective, and asserts that critique “must become more profound and must understand the repressive assumptions behind these concepts instead of demanding the realization of their ideals” (“nation, political regulation, bourgeois recognition”).

The mechanism of corrosion - Robert Kurz

In this article first published in 2002, Robert Kurz examines the cycles of booms and busts since the 1980s, identifies the United States as the linchpin of the world economy in its role as global consumer, points out that this role can only be sustained temporarily by way of credit and fictitious capital created by financial bubbles (a “pseudo-economy”) that increasingly renders the population superfluous for value production, predicts that “the real estate bubble will burst, too”, and concludes with the observation that “if the North American motor stops running, the whole world economy will grind to a halt”.

The political economy of human rights - Robert Kurz

In this article written in 2002 during the build-up for the second Iraq War, Robert Kurz exposes the ideology of human rights in the context of capitalist society as more of a “threat” than a “promise” for the economically “superfluous”, who are no longer the subjects of rights and, as such, forfeit all claim to value, and calls this “the principal secret of all political economy and, most pertinently, of modern democratic politics” and claims that “the emancipatory critique of human rights is the precondition of all critique in the 21st century, just as the critique of religion was the precondition of all critique in the 19th century”.

Self-emancipation and consciousness - Démocratie Communiste (Luxemburgiste)

A brief statement concerning the relation between consciousness, collective struggle, emancipation and the attainment of “a democratic, free and egalitarian world society”, from the French group, Démocratie Communiste (Luxemburgiste).

On cooperation - Paul Delesalle

An article by the French anarchosyndicalist Paul Delesalle in which the author points out some of the shortcomings of cooperatives from a revolutionary point of view.

Lessons of the counterrevolutions - Amadeo Bordiga

A 1953 text in which Amadeo Bordiga examines the lessons of counterrevolutions from the defeat of Spartacus to the Battle of Legnano in 1176 and from the Peasant War in Germany of 1525 to Stalinism (“State capitalism is not a semi-socialism, but just plain capitalism”) and recapitulates some “fundamental positions of Marxism”, which he describes as a “doctrine for the understanding of ... counterrevolutions”, since “everyone knows how to orient themselves at the moment of victory, but few are those who know what to do when defeat arrives” and “it is necessary to understand the counterrevolution in order to prepare the revolution of tomorrow”.