development

The Ideology of Progress in Latin America – Revista Argelaga

An essay “written on the occasion of the premier of the documentary film, ‘Asfaltar Bolivia’” [Paving Bolivia] in Barcelona (2015), denouncing the destructive impact of capitalist development and its hypocritical rhetoric of “progress”, “development” and “modernization”, in the context of the recent nationalist upsurge based on extractive industries and a modified form of globalization that has swept over Latin America as the new populist leaders attempt to impose “modern, consumerist, individualist and predatory lifestyles” to create a “social base” so the “extractivist bureaucracy can consolidate its power” at the expense of indigenous communities and “collective ways of life”.

Anti-developmentalism: what it is and what it wants - Miguel Amorós

A 2014 restatement of the meaning of “anti-developmentalism” by the Spanish activist and author, Miguel Amorós, which he defines as the new form of the “modern class struggle”.

Seeing like a state - James C. Scott

In this wide-ranging and original book, James C. Scott analyzes failed cases of large-scale authoritarian plans in a variety of fields. He argues that centrally managed social plans derail when they impose schematic visions that do violence to complex interdependencies that are not -- and cannot be -- fully understood.

Man and nature - Elisée Reclus

The present pamphlet contains two essays concerning the relationship between man and nature by the anarchist geographer Elisée Reclus. The first is a review of the book, Man and Nature, by George Perkins Marsh. In the second essay, Reclus concerns himself with the the awareness of nature in modern society.

The evolution of cities - Elisée Reclus

Anarchist geographer Elisée Reclus on the development and growth of cities.

North Devon community occupy local pub

Community outside pub

Residents of Forches housing estate in Barnstaple, North Devon, occupy their local.

Urban devastation: the planning of incarceration - George Williamson

Urban Devastation front cover

A pamphlet penned by George Williamson under a pseudonym, analysing urban development in the background of capitalist society and class struggle. Published by Solidarity (Oxford) c1976, much of it is still relevant.

Two editorials from Argelaga - Revista Argelaga

The two lead editorials from the first two issues (2013) of the Barcelona periodical, Argelaga: An Anti-Developmentalist Libertarian Journal, introducing the journal and declaring its perspectives and goals, which are summed up as the creation of “an atmosphere of dissidence and desertion in which the historical subject, which is nothing but the anti-capitalist community, can be constituted and consolidated” (Argelaga no. 1) in a struggle that is not just rural but aimed also at “a return to the city, that is, to the self-governed and de-capitalized space where liberty and history originated” (Argelaga no. 2).

Some random notes - Miguel Amorós

A series of observations concerning the current crisis and some possible solutions, touching upon the new kind of proletarian class struggle (based not on integration into capitalism but exclusion from its benefits), the need to rejuvenate the city as “agora”, the importance of “anti-developmentalism” and the need to unify its critical impetus with “urban and territorial conflicts”, the role of violence, and the formulation of different kinds of “rights” (to food, water, education, health care, assembly, self-defense, etc.) whose implementation will constitute the reinstatement of “customary traditional liberties”, etc.

The war against territory, the highest stage of domination - Miguel Amorós

An essay on the contemporary crisis (“the real crisis”) as the assault of capitalism against “the territory”, defined in the sense of land in its socially balanced and natural determinations (“metabolism with nature”) as opposed to the commodity real estate, the false, one-sided opposition movements (technocratic tinkering and misanthropic primitivism) that have arisen in response to this crisis, and the possible solution to the crisis that consists in a movement for a “predominantly rural, horizontal and egalitarian” society based on “renewable energies”, “ecological agriculture”, “public transport” and “local production”, among other things.