Donald Trump

Donald Trump, White Nationalism and America's Colonial Legacy

Rosa Soros discusses the colonial legacy of America, how it is still felt deeply today, and why we need a grassroots, revolutionary working class movement to fight - not just the forces of reaction brought about by the Trump administration - but the tide of liberalism that secured his power.

Trumpism as a historic turning point: 12 theses

Trump will print dollars to finance wars.

The following positions have already been formulated on 28-1-2017. Until now, the development of domestic and foreign policy of the United States confirms the trend towards intensified preparations for war. Therefore, I now publish these statements as a contribution to the debate among workers and within the proletarian internationalist milieu.

Authoritarian Neoliberalism: the Specter of Pinochet

Vaporwave Pinochet

This essay explores the rise of populist demagogues and the economics of their regimes. Rather than marking a clear break with neoliberalism or a direct tie to early twentieth century fascism, these figures historically connect to the regime of Augusto Pinochet and illustrate a growing trend of authoritarian-neoliberalism.

American labor isn’t dead, but definitely needs to wake up

The mood and discussions of late have largely been doom and gloom. Our series has tried to shine a light on some hope for workers resistance to counter the demobilize barrage of social and anti-social media. Our final piece in the Labor under Trump series comes from Ideas and Action the online publication of the Workers Solidarity Alliance. David Fernández-Barrial argues that there is an untapped potential within workplaces to defeat the threats looming, and take us closer to a just and equitable society.

Labor’s death under trump? The potential for a renewed workers movement in an era of dangers

Following the Trump victory speculation has been rampant and has led to various proclamations yet again of the death of labor. Our third piece exploring the potentials for labor under Trump comes from one of our editors S Nicholas Nappalos. He argues that while these dangers are real, they also come with new possibilities for a militant participatory workers movement. Moreover it is not apolitical unions that can address the weaknesses of the labor movement heading into a collision with this government, but an active politicized union movement marking its opposition to both capital and the state.

This Is Not a Drill: Bracing for the Trump Era

In our second installment in our Labor under Trump mini-series, Mark Brenner from Labor Notes explores what union members can do in the face of anticipated threats. At this point most of the debate is speculation, but the labor notes piece is worth discussing because they explore concrete experiences in areas where anti-labor policies have been implemented such as organizing in right-to-work states and solidarity with coworkers independent of their immigration status. Brenner paints a picture of a labor movement at a crossroads, a theme we will return to next week.

Labor under Trump

Great four-part series from the Recomposition blog about the implications for the American working class of the Republican majorities in every branch of government with President Trump at it’s helm.

The recuperation of authentic outrage

The victory of the Trump campaign, and the catapultic rise of the alt-right movement from the shadows of the internet into the mainstream political paradigm, has stimulated a mobilization of opposition, and an immediate call to action. However, the specter of performative activism and pseudo-outrage continues to blur the lines between genuine action and specious placation.

Against factional struggles in ruling classes/elites

The racsim and anti racsim

The polarization in the US following the Trump electoral victory is transformed to the ex-western bloc geography. The ruling classes' inter class struggle reflects an underlying class struggle -- “uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight ” (Marx) -- which is moving in a real-time speed and surely globally.

A popular front of the right?

Rather than being purely fascist or a mysterious contradictory collection of personalities, the Trump Administration can be best seen as a popular front reflecting and representing most of the American right-wing, argues Juan Conatz.