indigenous

The Occupation of Alcatraz

A history of the occupation of Alcatraz island by the Group Indians of All Tribes (IAT) a coalition of native American activists and documentation published to explain the occupation.

1944-52: Solomon Islanders Establish Autonomus Village Movement

In response to oppression by the British Empire the indigenous islanders turned to a Movement establishing autonomous villages outside the colonial economy.

1975-83: Maori New Zealanders Occupy Golf Course in Struggle for Tribal Lands

In the 70's Maori groups began a series of occupations to reclaim their tribal lands. The occupation of the Raglan golf course, a former burial site was an eight year struggle with the New Zealand government.

Ferguson is Familiar to Indigenous Australians: Larissa Behrendt

Indigenous Australia knows the cynicism exposed by Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson

1600: Iroquois Women Gain Power to Veto War

Account of the struggle of Iroquois women to stop frequent tribal conflict, by refusing sex and agricultural cultivation.

Indigenous Armed Group Created in the Mountains of Guerrero

They send a message to the world: “With autonomy we fight for life and territory”

Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies

A contemporary account and condemnation of the brutal expansion of the Spanish Empire into the West Indies.

The Wave Hill walk-off, 1966-1975

Wave Hill strikers

A short history of the Wave Hill, or Gurindji, strike, when aboriginal agricultural workers walked out for equal pay and then lodged a claim for the land they worked on. They remained out for an incredible nine years, and were eventually given back a proportion of the land.

The Cherokee Removal Through the Eyes of a Private Soldier

In May 1838, federal militias started to round up Cherokees and move them into stockades in several southern states. They were then forced to march one thousand miles westward. Thousands of Cherokees died as a result of the removal. The journey became known as "The Trail of Tears" or "The Trail Where They Cried." Fifty years later, in 1890, Private John Burnett, who served in the mounted infantry; told his children his memories of the Trail of Tears1, which he described as the "execution of the most brutal order in the History of American Warfare."

From Voices of A People's History, edited by Zinn and Arnove

The making of an interethnic coalition: urban and rural anarchists in La Paz, Bolivia, 1946–1947

Anarchist rally in La Paz, 1930.

Kevin A. Young's account of the interethnic alliance between urban anarchists and indigenous peasants which facilitated the 1947 upheavals surrounding La Paz, Bolivia.