legal

Class War in Social Democratic Sweden

Two activists with the SAC syndicalist union in Sweden write on the “Peace Obligation” proposal which would effectively outlaw strikes and workplaces actions outside of narrow conditions. The piece explains both the political context for the proposal – crafted jointly by employers and major unions and backed by the Social Democratic Party – as well as the the resistance led by a coalition of independent unions and activists.

Legal Aid Cuts: One Law for the Rich and an Increasingly Worse One for Everyone Else

The government is currently carrying out a review of legal aid following a series of cuts that have been implemented over the last few years. There is a growing view that the cuts have gone too far and could be a false economy as well as undermining faith in the legal system. Whilst it is unlikely that the government will put any significant amount of cash back into the system, it will probably at least pay lip service to the importance of legal aid. This article considers some of the issues at stake.

School Dinner Discipline: a little bit of solidarity can go a long way

A dinner lady came to Brighton SolFed when there was nowhere left to go. At the time, they faced a disciplinary hearing for gross misconduct in three days. They had not been paying union membership dues, so they were refused mainstream union representation.

Five reasons "red" Len won't break the law

“Red” Len McCluskey is once more rattling his sabre ahead of the General Election. But don’t expect it to ever be drawn. Here’s five reasons why.

Tackling the UK's “freelance” TEFL scandal

There's good news for UK language teachers: all of us should be on directly-employed contracts.

Colonial law and ideology: Israel and the Occupied Territories - Ben Cashdan

Investigation into the ways in which the law has been used by the Israeli state to ideologically legitimise land expropriations and the erosion of civil liberties for Palestinians.

Italy: Renzi government reforms jobs and cuts rights

Giuliano Poletti.

At first glance, Giuliano Poletti, Minister of Labour and Social Policy in the Renzi government, could look like an old-fashioned left-wing politician: born into a farming family in the “red” Emilia-Romagna region, raised in the Communist Party, president of Legacoop, the main national organisation of cooperatives. He could be someone to provide a contrast to the Prime Minister’s attitude towards jobs (modelled on the inspiring figures of Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair). But appearances can be deceptive.

Bologna activists banished from the city

Police and protesters clash in Piazza Verdi, Bologna.

It sounds like news from a distant time, way back in Italian history, but it actually happened in 2014. On 6 March, 12 activists were forced to leave Bologna – their own city, where they live and have jobs and partners – as a “precautionary measure“ during investigations into an event more than 9 months ago.

Italy does not tolerate organised protest: students prosecuted

An update on on changes to higher education and student protests in Italy as well as the government's legal repression of them.