management

Better than we know ourselves: a ruling class view of the trade unions

An article adapted from the May 2012 article of Black Flag magazine which examines the trade unions from the perspective of the bourgeoisie.

Human Resources: Social Engineering in the 20th Century (Documentary)

Human Resources: Social Engineering in the 20th Century explores the rise of mechanistic philosophy and the exploitation of human beings under modern hierarchical systems. Topics covered include behaviorism, scientific management, work-place democracy, schooling, frustration-aggression hypothesis and human experimentation

The battle of the sandwiches: what does the bosses' offensive look like?

Alex Erikson talks about a new manager who came into his workplace with the intent of breaking worker solidarity through small, winnable issues.

Hey boss, have you been working out?

Apparently bosses that exercise are nicer. I don't really care.

The origins of the union shop - Tom Wetzel

Union shop billboard

Article about the practice and limitations of union (closed) shops in the US workers' movement in the 1930s and 40s. In particular it examines how they helped unions act as a tool of discipline over workers as opposed to a tool for defending their interests.

Wherefore Art Thou Supervisor?

J.Pierce talks about the time they refused a supervisor position at a recycling center.

Technology and class

Subversion examine the role of technology in class struggle as a tool for ratcheting up the exploitation of the working class.

The Beloit Iron Works and the submergence of class struggle

The history of class struggle in the Beloit Iron Works and how the company responded to it and kept it to a minimum.

Myths of Dispersed Fordism - Echanges et Mouvement

Cover

Still-relevant debate from the early 1990s between Echanges et Mouvement and the Spanish journal Etcetera on the effects of post-Fordism on class composition/recomposition and class struggle.

Labor discipline and the decline of the soviet system - Don Filtzer

The issue of labor discipline lay at the very heart of the antagonistic relationship between the Soviet elite and its work force. Soviet industry was plagued with high labor turnover, absenteeism, heavy drinking, and slow work. Don Filtzer explains how this encouraged the system's eventual collapse.