pacifism

Retort Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1946)

The Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1946) issue of Retort, an anarchist publication produced out of Bearsville, New York from 1942-1951.

Resistance Vol. 12, No. 3 (August-October 1954)

The Vol. 12, No. 3 (August-October 1954) issue of Resistance, an anarchist publication produced out of New York.

Anarchy #014

Issue of Anarchy magazine from April 1962 dealing with pacifism and direct action.

Direct Action and the New Pacifism

NlCOLAS WALTER, who was one of the original members of the
Committee of 100 is a frequent contributor to Anarchy and to Freedom

Editorial: We are not Gandhis

An anti-pacifist editorial from the September 1925 issue of Industrial Pioneer.

Is Britain Worth Dying For?

Lady Olga Maitland (Families for Defence) arguing with CND in 1987

Transcript of the opening remarks from a debate between Steve Coleman arguing No (for the Socialist Party of Great Britain) and Lady Olga Maitland arguing Yes, (Women and Families for Defence) also a member of the Conservative party, taking place on 19 January 1984 at Islington Central Library in London. Full audio recording also available online.

The Keir Hardie Myth

New mural at Peace Passage based on Keir Hardie speaking at an anti war rally ju

From Socialist Standard March 1961
The myth about Keir Hardie's attitude to war is very persistent. At an anti-Polaris rally in Glasgow last December, the Co-operative Movement representative had only to refer to him, ". . . if we could get Keir Hardie here . . ." to have his words drowned by applause. Whatever the sentiments of the audience may have been, it was certainly in error about Hardie's attitude to war.

A new anarchism emerges, 1940–1954

A history by Andrew Cornell of the American anarchism movement from the beginning of the Second World War until the mid-1950s.

The War and The Socialist Position

Socialist Standard September 1914

The text is taken from the original leaflet, THE WAR AND THE SOCIALIST POSITION, produced and printed by The Socialist Party of Great Britain. The leaflet was published for distribution to the working class until being prevented from being circulated at meetings by the capitalist State on the spurious grounds that it was considered “likely to cause disaffection to His Majesty or to interfere with the success of His Majesty’s forces by land or sea etc.” with the imposition of The Defence of the Realm Regulations enacted in November 1914.