politicians

Libertarian critique and the left wing of capitalism - Miguel Amorós

In these (January 2016) draft notes for a lecture on the “partiocracy” and its crisis—pertaining for the most part to Spain and Southern Europe—Miguel Amorós points out that, while the “professional politicians” continue to betray their former constituencies (relatively privileged layers of the middle class), and the civil society movement (the “left wing of capitalism”, “led for the most part by professors and lawyers”) tries to rally those same constituencies to support illusory “reforms”, a revolutionary response must involve at least in part the pursuit of a kind of “restoration” that takes its “inspiration from historical examples of non-capitalist ways of living together”.

Syrian refugees get Obama’s sympathy, what about the refugees of the war on drugs and NAFTA?

Obama claims to care about Syrian refugees, but the refugees from the US led "war on drugs" and free trade agreements receive no such sympathy.

Labour party debate What is Socialism?

Is Labour Government the Way to Socialism 1946 SPGB pamphlet cover

Transcript of the opening remarks of a debate between Steve Coleman (for the Socialist Party of Great Britain) and Councillor Laurence Spigel (for the Labour party) taking place on 4 April 1985 at the Duke of York in London. Full audio recording also available online.

The golden mediocrity - Miguel Amorós

Considerations on the political situation in Spain in 2015, with a brief historical survey of the origins of the civil society movement in the aftermath of the defeat of the workers movement in the eighties, the rise of postmodernism, the impact of the economic crisis, the sources of middle class discontent that gave rise to the civil society movement during the nineties, the new social democratic nostalgia and renascent regional nationalism, and the need to break out of the constraints imposed by the civil society movement in order to really fight for “an egalitarian social transformation of society”.

5 reasons to steer clear of the Labour Party bandwagon

After a campaign that seemed to drag on endlessly in the wake of the general election, Jeremy Corbyn has won the Labour Party leadership by a landslide. The most immediate consequence of this has been a surge in membership. Here are some reasons not to get caught up in the tide.

On America, part 4: I hate my job

When it comes to problems on the job, we're generally given few options: quit, vote, join a union. Here's why that's not good enough.

The final part in a series challenging some of the underlying assumptions of American political thought, earlier parts here, here, and here.

Disenchantment – Argelaga

An essay on political corruption in Spain published in May 2015, its impunity, its roots in the “partiocracy” that emerged from the “Transition”, its penetration of the Judiciary, and the resulting disenchantment of the population—awakened from its apathy regarding such chicanery now that the economic boom that accompanied the construction of the new Spanish State-form has come to an end—which has led to attempts by political opportunists to rehabilitate the party system by forming new, vaguely progressive “civil society” parties and regional separatist movements, rather than recognizing that “corruption is not the exception, but is inscribed in the very nature of the system”.

Capital Mafia: fascists, politicians, cooperatives and the Roman mob

Massimo Carminati.

An excellent in-depth analysis on recent revelations in Italy about the connections in Rome between the Mafia, the far-right and local politicians, both left and right-wing.

On Labour's pledge to axe the bedroom tax

Why the pledge from the Labour Party to axe the Bedroom Tax doesn't mean we've won and, if we take it at face value, could mean that we lose.

Like father, like son: Fascists of the 3rd Millennium in Italy

Two policemen are under investigation for covering up a fascist brawl that involved Rome’s Mayor’s son, Manfredi Alemanno.