school students

It's not all fun and games

Blog entry about capitalist business simulations including football team managing and sharedealing at the Croydonian anarchist's school and sixth form.

What happened in Brighton? - N24 student walkout

A breakaway group on Black Lion street, having escaped the Town Hall kettle

The following aims to provide some basic materials for people who were involved or interested in the events of N24 (during the student movement in Britain winter 2010-11), to think about what happened there and what it means for them – and for next time. It’s based on numerous personal accounts, collated into a punch-by-punch narrative.

Statistics statistics statistics

As the title suggests, the role of statistics in school policy towards teachers and students is becoming ever more prominent. Of course schools have long since entered the realm of competition but recent events have reminded me of this.

Education and the nature of success

The first full blog post from Croydonian anarchist, describing (and critiquing) a talk recently put on by his school about being "successful".

Class size matters... but money is tight.

The resistance to smaller class sizes in state schools boils down to one thing - economics.

Italy: Occupy Everywhere, Occupy Everything! November 17

…And here we go again! Italy’s streets were put under occupation once again today, as part of the “International Student’s Day”, originally created to commemorate the students deported by the Nazi regime after a protest in Prague.

Opposing academies and "free" schools - Education Workers Network

The text of a brief introductory leaflet on Academies and Free Schools by the Education Workers Network distributed at the 2011 London Anarchist Bookfair.

A warning to students of all ages - Raoul Vaneigem

Raoul Vaneigem

The author of The Revolution of Everyday Life tackles the issue of education under bourgeois society and how it must be overcome.

Mobilisation versus representation: the UK student movement in November and December 2010

This article was published in the January 2011 issue of The Commune. It argues that the student movement's strength comes from below, not from the long march through institutions.

France: occupations of secondary, primary and infant schools

Infant school occupation, Caen

Since the very end of March, there have been increasing amounts of schools occupations throughout France. Provoked by the suppression of nearly 16,000 teaching posts, the closure of classes, the threatened closure of some of these schools and the consequent increases in class sizes, these occupations have been particularly concentrated on infant schools and primary schools, but have also included "Middle Schools" ("Collèges" for 11 to 14 or 15-year-olds) and those lycées with "Collèges" attached to them. Though it's hard to gauge how many occupations there have been, it must be at least 250.