Shūsui Kōtoku

The Great Treason Incident - Anarchism in Japan

Sketch of the anarchist defendants

A podcast episode on the Great Treason Incident and the early Anarchist movement in Japan.

Anarchy #05

Fifth Issue of Anarchy Magazines second series, the cover issue is on Anarchism in Japan, in two parts.

Monster of the Twentieth Century: Kotoku Shusui and Japan's First Anti-Imperialist Movement

This extended monograph examines the work of the radical journalist Kotoku Shusui and Japan’s anti-imperialist movement of the early twentieth century. It includes the first English translation of Imperialism (Teikokushugi), Kotoku’s classic 1901 work.

The origins of socialist thought in Japan - John Crump

Socialism first gained a major foothold in Japan after the revolution and the subsequent Meiji restoration of 1868. Against the background of the rapid development of capitalism in Japan after the revolution, and the accompanying emergence of the working class, this study shows how early Japanese socialists drew on both Western influences and elements from traditional Japanese culture. This book made an original contribution to the study of Japan in the 1980s, its unique perspective shines a bright light on debates still relevant today.

Hatta Shūzō and Pure Anarchism in Interwar Japan - John Crump

A pioneering study of Japanese 'pure anarchism' between the wars focused on its principal theoretician, Hatta Shuzo.

Volume 6 Issue 2

Vol. VI APRIL, 1911 No. 2

Three Japanese anarchists: Kotoku, Osugi and Yamaga - Victor Garcia

Excellent pamphlet looking at the history of the Japanese anarchist movement, and in particular the lives (and deaths, in the two former cases) of Shūsui Kōtoku, Osugi Sakae and Taiji Yamaga.

Anarcho-syndicalism in Japan: 1911 to 1934 - Philippe Pelletier

An essay on the rise and fall of organized anarchism in Japan in the early 20th century, with special emphasis on its anarcho-syndicalist dimension, with interesting details concerning the disputes, splits and controversies that plagued the Japanese movement and which were surprisingly similar in their basic contours to those that affected the anarchist movement in the West during the same period.