women

The logic of gender: on the separation of spheres and the process of abjection

Marxist-feminists have employed a number of binary oppositions: productive/reproductive, paid/unpaid and public/private. We interrogate these categories and propose new ones. Starting from the specificities of the production and reproduction of labour-power, we define gender as the anchoring of individuals into two separate spheres of social reproduction. We trace the development of these spheres through the history of the capitalist mode of production, and survey the dynamics of gender in the recent crisis, which we characterize as a rise of the abject.

Latin American anarchist women

Porto Alegre modern school, 1917

Pamphlet about the lives of some little-known Latin American anarchist women, by Edgar Rodriguez.

Elena Quinteros, 1945-1976

Elena Quinteros

A short biography of Uruguayan anarchist teacher Elena Quinteros, who was disappeared by the US-backed military dictatorship, written by Edgar Rodrigues.

Yakimova, Anna, 1856-1942

Anna Yakimova

A short biography of Russian revolutionary Anna Yakimova, a.k.a. Anna Vasilevna Yakimova-Dikovsky.

The women's day massacre, 1937

A striker wounded in the women's day massacre

A short account of the 19 June killing of 16 people and wounding of 283 by police during a demonstration of women and children in support of a steel workers' strike.

Sisters Uncut Occupy London’s Holloway Prison

Image credit @sistersuncut, flares on the roof of Holloway Prison

Sisters Uncut, a UK-based feminist group, held a week-long occupation of north London’s Holloway Prison in late May in response to conservative austerity policies that have had a damaging effect on social services for victims of domestic violence.

Violence in the women’s suffrage movement

Police survey Saunderton Railway Station after a suffragette arson attack, 1913

A brief account of some of the many violent incidents in the UK women’s fight for the right to vote in the early 20th century, by Steven Johns.

Voting as Counter-Revolution – how the politicians who gave us the vote saw things 100 years ago

A hundred years ago, the British ruling class decided to extend the vote to women over thirty and to working class men. By doing this they hoped to restore people's faith in parliamentary government and thereby counter any revolutionary tendencies inspired by the Russian Revolution. As Sylvia Pankhurst said in 1923:

Chiefly a Dialogue. Concerning Some Difficulties of a Dunce.

Chiefly a Dialogue. Concerning Some Difficulties of a Dunce. by Louisa Sarah Bevington, published 1895. Copy from Victorian Women Writers Project.