World War II

The Hajduks of Cotovschi

A short history of The Hajduks of Cotovschi, an anarchist communist partisan organization from Romania, that pursued its activity in Bucharest, between 1939 to 1941.

Class-conscious machinists: "Stormy petrels of west coast labor"

Machinists on strike at Bethlehem shipyard, San Francisco, October 29, 1945

Sister machinist unions, San Francisco's Lodge 68 of the International Association of Machinists and Oakland's Local 1304 of the CIO's Steel Workers Organizing Committee (which left the IAM over a wildcat strike in 1936), had a national reputation for militancy; Lodge 68 had more strikes during World War II than all other Bay Area unions combined. Along with Local 1304, they accrued this strike record in open defiance of the National War Labor Board, who were backed by the FBI, the Office of Economic Stabilization in the White House, a Navy Vice-Admiral, the War Manpower Commission, the collective bosses, who in turn were supported by the CIO, ILWU, and Communist Party.

American labor on the defensive: A 1940’s odyssey - Stan Weir

An article by Stan Weir surveying the effects World War II and the post-war years had on CIO unions and the American working class.

War on the waterfront - Peter Cole

drawing of IWW dockers

Chapter 4 of "Wobblies on the waterfront-interracial unionism in progressive-era Philadelphia" by Peter Cole, an excellent text about the American IWW in the early 20th century, and interestingly about some Wobblies' support of World War I.

Wartime strikes: The struggle against the no-strike pledge in the UAW during World War II - Martin Glaberman

Martin Glaberman's examination of American car industry workers wildcat strike wave, despite their own union's no strike pledge, during World War 2.

The struggle in the factory: history of a Royal Ordnance Factory

The History of Dalmuir R.O.F. is the history of any other war-time factory, it is the story of the workers' struggle against the forces of capitalism aided an abetted by the fakirs of the trade unions and the Communist Party. Faced with these odds it is creditable that the workers did not succumb entirely, and that a band of them continued in opposition and endeavoured to preserve some degree of sanity throughout the welter of lies, distortions and intrigue that surrounded the worker.

Death to the brutes

Following is a complete translation of the anarchist poster
titled "Death to The Brutes." One hundred fifty copies were
printed in August, 1943; it was signed International
Revolutionary Syndicalist Federation (F.I.S.R.).
The Stan Iverson Memorial Library & Anarchist Archives

To All Intellectual And Manual Workers

The following is a complete translation of a text written in
Marseille in 1943 by Jean Sauliere (alias Andre Arru), Voline
and other comrades. Between 3,000 and 5,000 copies were printed
in Toulouse. It was signed International Revolutionary
Syndicalist Federation (F.I.S.R. was the French acronym).
Translations and Summaries by Charlatan Stew
Seattle, U.S.A., 1995
Taken from: http://recollectionbooks.com/siml/library/index.html

Winston Churchill and the "second front": a reappraisal - Tuvia Ben-Moshe

This article shows how Churchill's war strategy was determined by British soldiers' reluctance to fight another bloody world war.

Churchill's plans 'to drench Germany with poison gas' and anthrax - Robert Harris and Jeremy Paxman

'... It may be several weeks or even months before I shall ask you to drench Germany with poison gas, and if we do it, let us do it 100%.' - Winston Churchill