How can we (re)build the Anarchist movement in Britain?

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AlexA
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Joined: 16-09-03
Feb 27 2004 13:19

Welcome to the fold knightrose and now The Blast too 8)

I think a good proportion of students work too, over 50% at least, generally in very crappy precarious jobs/temping etc...

butchersapron
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Joined: 25-07-05
Feb 27 2004 13:47

...and quite often in the crappest most precarious jobs. Working class students usually end up having to work through as well...

Augusto_Sandino
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Joined: 21-02-04
Feb 27 2004 14:02

Yeah, actually i'm sorry people, i was a bit snipey. I am a sixth form student, and im looking forward to being a radical uni student. I just think alot of leftists think in the past, they think that unionised sheet-metal workers are leading the revolution, but the sad fact is that they arent, and they hardly even exist. The students though, do pull people into general strikes and stuff all the time, Paris 68 anyone? or Mexico? And i dont mean the London School of Economics or King's College, the majority of students at UEA (where i want to go) or Hull or whatever are going to be working class. I cant see someone who can go to Cambridge going to Hull instead.

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JoeMaguire
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Joined: 26-09-03
Feb 27 2004 16:11

Good luck but my experience of uni was it was so un-radical it was painful, infact theres probably more radical lecturers than there are students neutral

knightrose
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Joined: 8-11-03
Feb 27 2004 17:09
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The students though, do pull people into general strikes and stuff all the time, Paris 68 anyone? or Mexico?

Augusto, Those were very peculiar circumstances and are far from typical. However, don't let that stop you organising at uni when you get there. Far and away the best place for anarchists to propagandise is where they really are, not going off to factory gates to give awy our free sheets! smile

Personally I had loads of fun at both Kings and Keele.

Upsurges of class struggle come along unexpectedly at times and from strange places. Nobody expected the Poll Tax movement to be so huge, nor did they expect our ideas to be so readily accepted at the time. But they were. I can't predict where the next wave will come from, only that it will.

The Blast
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Joined: 12-02-04
Feb 27 2004 18:48
Quote:
I think a good proportion of students work too, over 50% at least, generally in very crappy precarious jobs/temping etc...
Quote:
...and quite often in the crappest most precarious jobs. Working class students usually end up having to work through as well...

So is it fair to say that the price that the state will pay for increasing student numbers (to keep otherwise idle people busy?) and continuing to reduce funding for these students is a further blurring of the distinction between students and workers?

butchersapron
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Joined: 25-07-05
Feb 27 2004 19:14

I think it's happening already, esp with the rise in numbers of part time and mature students...with the younger straight from school students it might take some time to develop along those lines, but in general, yes i can see that happening.

Augusto_Sandino
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Joined: 21-02-04
Feb 28 2004 16:17
Quote:
Upsurges of class struggle come along unexpectedly at times and from strange places. Nobody expected the Poll Tax movement to be so huge, nor did they expect our ideas to be so readily accepted at the time. But they were. I can't predict where the next wave will come from, only that it will.

Yeah, im going with that.

Dhr! Teeson
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Joined: 11-02-04
Feb 29 2004 00:04

i'm a full time student and work in a club most nights. i pay for myself and dont really have too hard a time, but then i dont go in for the whole student glut scene, which is tragically uncommited. i still think i shouldnt have to pay for my education, but i'm fucked if i'm gonna get snared in the debt trap and so be forced to work in civil service to pay it off

i'd say about 3 percent of the student body at this uni are 'in-to' radical politics, but rarely are they as well informed as the goodfolk who contribute to these forums. and its quite hard at first to locate a bunch of people not in it just for the sake of style, the radicals from the neo-hippies, or, the wheat from the chaff

however, i prefer discussing such things as we are wont to do here with the people i work with, because by and large they are dependent only on their own labour and have most to lose [and gain] by socio-economic changes and therefore give a better perspective, a practical voice.

They all think i'm daft of course, but whenever i do offer an opinion, garaunteed the strongest debate will start, and you can see how much people thrive on such debates, and they cant help but admire the direct action initiatives we engage in. one fella says to me that it gave him a hopeful feeling that there were people out there actually doing something to oppose the government

i think the best thing anyone with radical convictions can do especially if they havent been in the labour 'market' for long or at all, is to talk to people who have, and who dont share your opinions. the people i talk with beyond networks come up with the best counter arguments and are the hardest to convince that 'its all fucked up!' at least now they are clearer on the true meaning of anarchy and libertarianism

though in other jobs i've done the people were just as apathetic and numb to radical politics and more so to radical social structures as students are. probably because they are totally unfamilliar with the language and tradition, which seems old world and something the unions take care of. fact is the state has bought the workers off, given them a minumum share of capital, a simulation of bourgeois luxury, and the universal opiate of ubiquitous media.

this said i'm not gonna wait around for the next wave to come, i'm gonna keep rockin the boat and see if i cant help make the next wave happen.

knightrose
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Joined: 8-11-03
Feb 29 2004 08:55
Quote:
Dhr! Teeson: this said i'm not gonna wait around for the next wave to come, i'm gonna keep rockin the boat and see if i cant help make the next wave happen.

Agreed. I wasn't trying to suggest we just sit back and wait for things ot happen. We are, after all, part of society and hopefully part of the cause of its downfall. I was just trying to put forward the optimistic view that it isn't all down to our own efforts.

Dhr! Teeson
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Joined: 11-02-04
Feb 29 2004 11:45

i just hope the next wave is a positive conscious effort toward change rather than a reaction to some environmental disaster [though more than a few i talk with say'bring it on']. my own doom inclination tends toward it being as a result of state oppression following oil-peak crisis.

though maybe it is down to our efforts to build a framework, not in a vangaurdist manner. we build the anarchist movement in britain not from scratch but from what's already present [dialectic?] and simply by seriously TRYING. personally this prospect doesnt make me feel pessimistic, nor is it daunting if we do it together.

The Blast
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Joined: 12-02-04
Feb 29 2004 13:41

This point came up in a conversation I had with other anarchists last week. Like all of you I'm sure, I certainly do all I can now to “spread the word”, kick back against the system and strengthen ties with other revolutionaries.I feel at the same time though, that some of this is preparatory work - so when it kicks off properly next we are ready to go.

I still think that despite all of the superb stuff going on we didn’t do ourselves justice during either the firefighters strike or the anti-war movement. The latter in particular was both inspiring and frustrating. The only times I felt it was out of the control of the Official Opposition was at Fairford and the school strikes/demonstrations. (Please tell me if I’m being overly pessimistic!) The Left succeeded in engineering their passive recruitment fairs (sorry, demonstrations) in London and no doubt done well out of it. How could we have been more influential in encouraging and inspiring the autonomous actions going on? To what extent could we have an influence in another upsurge in struggle similar to that against the Poll Tax unless we get more organised?

Well done LAY people btw. A very positive step smile

Augusto_Sandino
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Joined: 21-02-04
Feb 29 2004 20:35

To go with popular authoritario-commie Che Guevara, revolutionary circumstances can be created by revolutionary actions.

Steve
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Joined: 27-06-06
Feb 29 2004 20:59

Trouble is when Che put his theory (based on the "Foci Theory") into action it failed and he ended up dead. A slight flaw there I think.

Augusto_Sandino
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Joined: 21-02-04
Mar 2 2004 20:33

Yeah, i know. Probably not the best recommendation, from a corpse with no hands. He just came to mind when i was reading the other posts.