Personal info on a post

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Jim Crutchfield
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Feb 9 2007 16:42
Personal info on a post

Hello. There's a post on LibCom that contains my personal cell phone number, and I'd like it edited out. Would an administrator please contact me by email for details? Thanks.

Regards,

Jim Crutchfield

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 9 2007 16:44

i've pm'ed you

Black Flag
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Feb 10 2007 16:39

This has nothing to do with this thread but I would like to change my user name, can anyone help?I have already tried changing it but when I typed in my e-mail address I was told that a user(me obviously)had already got that e-mail address,what can I do?

Black Flag
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Feb 10 2007 16:41

incidently my e-mail address is: admin - not needed, and you'll get spammed wink

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 10 2007 16:41

an admin can do it for you - post up your new username here and someone will do asap

Black Flag
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Feb 10 2007 16:41

ok my new username is:V

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 10 2007 16:44

already taken unfortunately - plan b?

Black Flag
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Feb 12 2007 16:25

Right I will have to go for:Big Jack McTussoch

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 16:43

done. assuming that isn't a joke tongue

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jef costello
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Feb 12 2007 18:57

I think you should say who this person was before, so I don't get confused

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 19:25

Tim - i've edited your tagline to say 'formerly Tim' - you can delete it obviously in my profile - edit - personal - custom title

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Lone Wolf
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Feb 12 2007 19:32
Joseph K. wrote:
Tim - i've edited your tagline to say 'formerly Tim' - you can delete it obviously in my profile - edit - personal - custom title

The correct term is nee only with an umlaut (is that the word) above the second e.. or does that only apply to married women when referring to their maiden name..does anyone know..its the kinda thing Jef might know and nee sounds a bit French...cool

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 19:36

umlaut's the german one : rotated 90o, it's called something else which i was told the other day but can't remember embarrassed

acute accent will do (hold down Alt Gr and press e = é) - et voilà!

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Lone Wolf
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Feb 12 2007 19:56

Cool - just tried that...how do you get it the other way slanted for the a in voila????

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 20:08

dunno ... i only learned that the other day, i just looked up voilà at dictionary.com and copy & pasted tongue

aswad
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Feb 12 2007 20:54
Joseph K. wrote:
umlaut's the german one : rotated 90o, it's called something else which i was told the other day but can't remember embarrassed

Doppelpunkt

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 20:59

is dopplepunkt [double point?] the name of the ".." above an o? i've just been told the é accent is called an aigu "if you want to sound clever", and i do. but an acute accent for laymen.

Grace
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Feb 12 2007 21:04
Joseph K. wrote:
is dopplepunkt [double point?] the name of the ".." above an o? i've just been told the é accent is called an aigu "if you want to sound clever", and i do. but an acute accent for laymen.

Haha no Doppelpunkt is a colon. The two dots over vowels in German is an Umlaut and in other languages it's usually a diaresis.

Grace
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Feb 12 2007 21:07
Lone Wolf wrote:
The correct term is nee only with an umlaut (is that the word) above the second e.. or does that only apply to married women when referring to their maiden name..does anyone know..its the kinda thing Jef might know and nee sounds a bit French...cool

It's just for maiden names as far as I'm aware - née means 'born' in the feminine, it's not quite the same as 'formerly'

Blacknred Ned
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Feb 12 2007 21:19

Right Grace, so Big Jack (if Big Jack is a bloke.... and it would be funnier if Big Jack is a woman) should have the tagline né Tim because né is the pp of the French verb naitre, to be born.... well except that I have no idea where the circumflex is and so I can't quite get naitre right of course!

petey
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Feb 12 2007 21:21
Grace wrote:
diaresis.

oooooooooo we have a CLASSICS degree!! smile)

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Lone Wolf
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Feb 12 2007 21:39

Hey cheers Grace and other peeps..

Guessed you guys would like my lil questions there...

(language nerds.. roll eyes wink )

JK Can't believe you went to the effort of c and ping voila!! I applaud your efforts here.. cool (super-geek... tongue)

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Joseph Kay
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Feb 12 2007 21:55

actually i have a firefox plugin that pops up dictionary definitions if you alt-click, so it wasn't much effort. although i've just confirmed i'm a super-geek.

Grace
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Feb 12 2007 21:59
Blacknred Ned wrote:
Right Grace, so Big Jack (if Big Jack is a bloke.... and it would be funnier if Big Jack is a woman) should have the tagline né Tim because né is the pp of the French verb naitre, to be born.... well except that I have no idea where the circumflex is and so I can't quite get naitre right of course!

Errrr, possibly. I'm pretty sure the term only applies to name changes by marriage but yeah if you were gonna use the same term regardless it should be masculine so né.

Grace
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Feb 12 2007 22:01
newyawka wrote:
Grace wrote:
diaresis.

oooooooooo we have a CLASSICS degree!! smile)

Ohhhhhh yeah cool

Blacknred Ned
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Feb 13 2007 12:22

Grace wrote:

Quote:
Errrr, possibly. I'm pretty sure the term only applies to name changes by marriage

Are you suggesting that only women should change their names at marriage? I think you seriously need to update your narrow view of this (stinking bourgeois) institution to come into line with modern (sickly pc gobshite) liberal norms.

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Steven.
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Feb 13 2007 12:35
Blacknred Ned wrote:
Grace wrote:
Quote:
Errrr, possibly. I'm pretty sure the term only applies to name changes by marriage

Are you suggesting that only women should change their names at marriage?

I take it this is a joke, Ned?

Grace
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Feb 13 2007 13:07
Blacknred Ned wrote:
Grace wrote:
Quote:
Errrr, possibly. I'm pretty sure the term only applies to name changes by marriage

Are you suggesting that only women should change their names at marriage? I think you seriously need to update your narrow view of this (stinking bourgeois) institution to come into line with modern (sickly pc gobshite) liberal norms.

Not at all, but I doubt formerly-Tim decided to change his username because he got married tongue

aswad
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Feb 13 2007 13:12
Joseph K. wrote:
is dopplepunkt [double point?] the name of the ".." above an o? i've just been told the é accent is called an aigu "if you want to sound clever", and i do. but an acute accent for laymen.

This : is called Doppelpunkt. 'Double point' would be the literal translation.
Above a, o, or u it's called Umlaut by most people, however not by us;) - since we can pronouce the appropriate sounds (ducking and running).

You can sound even more clever, BTW:
this accent ` is called accent grave
and the other one which looks like a rooftop is an accent circonflex

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Steven.
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Feb 13 2007 13:18

I learnt the accent names doing a thing where you hold your arms over your head.

Grace
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Feb 13 2007 13:22
aswad wrote:
This : is called Doppelpunkt. 'Double point' would be the literal translation.

In English the punctuation mark is called a colon. Not sure where the term comes from though, the German makes more sense as always.

Quote:
Above a, o, or u it's called Umlaut by most people, however not by us;) - since we can pronouce the appropriate sounds (ducking and running).

That's interesting - do you just say the sound of the letter to indicate that you're talking about for example an o-with-Umlaut rather than just o?

[philology geek]If you want to sound even more clever the full term is an 'Umlaut mark' because it indicates that the phonological phenomenon of Umlaut has taken place i.e. the vowel sound has become more frontal - this is just a Germanic thing which is why although the same mark is used in e.g. French it doesn't indicate a vowel change in Romance.[/philology geek]