Batman - The Dark Knight Rises (spoilers)

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satawal
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Aug 14 2012 12:58

Wayne Manor - Historic site of class warfare

I was in Nottingham last week and in-between work popped into the council owned deer park/natural history museum - Woolaton Park. To my surprise there was stuff up about how the new batman ( which I have not seen) had in part been filmed there and Woolaton Hall was the films Wayne Manor.

Given comments above about Batman as reactionary hero the history of the hall is worth mentioning. Owned by a coal baron the chartists tried to attack it but were repelled by an armed detachment of yeomanry. Having been repelled the chartist rioters went on to burn Nottingham castle, another great hall and a silk mill. The owner was so proud of his defence that the spectrum of muskets used against the rioters was (and still is) displayed on the wall in the main hall. You can see a picture here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/9745838@N02/7288199846

The following is from Nottingham Radical History Group website

"1831-2
In March 9,000 city residents sign a petition calling for electoral reform.
Following the defeat of a very moderate parliamentary reform bill in the House of Lords, the ‘Reform Riots’ erupt as large numbers of people militantly respond to the hated ‘boroughmongers’ yet again succeeding in defending their privileges. Houses of known Tories, as well as dwellings and shops of their supporters and various law enforcers are attacked all over Nottingham. Crowds target the property of local grandees, such as the 4th Duke of Newcastle. Colwick Hall is trashed, Nottingham Castle and a silk mill in Beeston burned down. An attempt to liberate prisoners from the House of Correction is thwarted by the military. Following the mobilisation of Yeomanry and large numbers of special constables, an attack on Wollaton Hall is also repelled. In the end two people are shot and wounded by the military. Three persons are subsequently hanged on the steps of Shire Hall (known today as the Galleries of Justice). "

From: http://peopleshistreh.wordpress.com/timeline/

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Juan Conatz
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Aug 30 2012 09:48

pretty good superhero flick, laughable and half-assed political commentary on Occupy.

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flaneur
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Aug 30 2012 10:42

Is that not a unfair criticism, why should it have decent politics? It's not like Nolan fancies him as Godard or Pasolini, he probably liked the look of Occupy thematically and thought it would be identifiable. The other thing is he's a 30 something millionaire director, he would struggle to relate even if he did give a toss.

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Arbeiten
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Aug 30 2012 10:51
flaneur wrote:
Is that not a unfair criticism, why should it have decent politics? It's not like Nolan fancies him as Godard or Pasolini, he probably liked the look of Occupy thematically and thought it would be identifiable. The other thing is he's a 30 something millionaire director, he would struggle to relate even if he did give a toss.

Let him say whatever he wants on a huge public forum because he is rich wink. I don't think anyone is saying the film should have had good politics. They are just saying it had shit politics. That is completely fair in my eyes....

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flaneur
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Aug 30 2012 11:04

No, more like because he's rich, he's only going to look at things like Occupy from an aesthetics perspective. If you go see a populist blockbuster film, you're likely to be disappointed by the politics every time. But I dunno why anyone would think that surprising.

NannerNannerNan...
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Aug 31 2012 16:53
revol68 wrote:
Nolan, 21st century Burke.

Can't up this enough.

I was watching the movie online, but all it did was piss me off. If nolan wanted to suck elite dick he doesn't need to make movies.

Superheros in the 21st century have just become metapolitical fascist bullshit. Beating up teh criminals and making sure the status quo doesn't even get threatened. There are no more villians, just rabble-rousers and brown people.

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flaneur
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Aug 31 2012 18:37

Think someone said this already but superheroes have always been like that, Batman especially since Frank Miller's stuff in the 80s. Though without that, you'd never have the superhero destruction stuff of Watchmen and The Boys. So swings and roundabouts.

Still, there's been a few Batman comics to show how little he can actually change things. Arkham Asylum started the idea he has a symbiotic relationship with those he put away and needs them just as much as they need him. And Night Cries is about a care home where the children are being abused but he knows he can't do anything about fundamental societal problems. Because he's this perfect symbol, someone else can come in and destroy him as they fit.

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flaneur
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Oct 6 2012 13:41

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Standfield
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Oct 7 2012 03:44

iexist - try here, some very good stuff listed:

http://libcom.org/library/art-further-reading-guide

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Standfield
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Oct 7 2012 04:24

Well, in terms of reviews, I'm not sure, but Third Text and the New Left Review have some very interesting contemporary reviews/articles from time to time. NLR is bi-monthly and TT is seasonal, so it's not a regular source as such, but still good.

http://newleftreview.org/
http://www.thirdtext.com/

There are Marxist "art critics" out there, the ones that spring to mind are Julian Stallabrass and Chin-Tao Wu. Both write occasionally for NLR, and Stallabrass is a patron of TT.

Hope this helps.

Mark.
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Oct 7 2012 09:43

Paul Mason: Does Occupy signal the death of contemporary art?

omen
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Oct 7 2012 11:09
iexist wrote:
I should have been more accurate, I meant reviews and such

Maoist Movie reviews. Enjoy! wink

Also, I'm planning to blog here a series of essays about the history of the depiction of communism in Hollywood (a bit more complicated than that actually). I've got copious notes, and I started writing it up, but I just got a book on the subject, and want to finish that first*. It won't include reviews, as such, but I will be picking apart a selection of classic (mostly) sci-fi movies**.

[* So far, it looks like there isn't a lot of overlap between the book and what I am intending, but I still want to finish it first. I've also got to get a blog here!]

[** And they're ones I like, I might add, so I'm not going to be writing this: "Under the joint dictatorship of the proletariat we won't need this movie."]

omen
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Oct 7 2012 11:55

As for The Dark Knight Rises, I've not seen the film yet, but according to this, the co-creator of (the original) Bane, Chuck Dixon, describes himself as a "lifelong" conservative, and specifically says that Bane is "far more akin to an Occupy Wall Street type if you're looking to cast him politically."

I've been fairly "meh!" about the current run of superhero movies, which is why I haven't got around to watching TDKR yet. I saw the The Avengers again when it came out on DVD, and I suddenly realized I hadn't thought about it once since I first saw it. I quite enjoyed it while I watched it, and I've seen it three times, now, but I find it eminently forgettable. By comparison, I watched the French-Belgium film Rosetta (about a girl who works on a Belgium waffle stand) about a decade ago on TV, once, and I still find myself thinking about it every few months. I don't know what the budget was but I'm guessing less than $220 million.

Released around the same time as The Avengers was Cabin in the Woods (both directed and co-written by Joss Wheedon, whose work I like) which I thought was a far better movie, imo. Again, it was produced for peanuts, by comparison with The Avengers.

I wasn't bothered about the last two Batman films either, though I have a soft spot for Tim Burton's Batman, and to a lesser extent Batman Returns, which were sullied somewhat by the shit sequels. Although in hindsight they do look somewhat twee and Burtonesque (does every film of his have to look exactly the same!?).

Mark.
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Oct 9 2012 10:53

David Graeber takes on Batman:

http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/super-position/

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Steven.
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Oct 9 2012 11:27
iexist wrote:
I should have been more accurate, I meant reviews and such

there are quite a lot here:
http://libcom.org/tags/reviews

omen wrote:
By comparison, I watched the French-Belgium film Rosetta (about a girl who works on a Belgium waffle stand)

interesting fact: in Belgium, Belgian waffles are called "waffles".

omen
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Oct 9 2012 11:35
Steven. wrote:
omen wrote:
By comparison, I watched the French-Belgium film Rosetta (about a girl who works on a Belgium waffle stand)

interesting fact: in Belgium, Belgian waffles are called "waffles".

Heh. I clearly didn't think that one through. (Think I probably edited in the first Belgium after I'd written the rest.)

Also, good find Mark., I'm reading it now.

wojtek
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Dec 18 2012 23:25