Suggested reading?

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zugzwang
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Jun 2 2018 14:22

Nietzsche and Anarchy, anonymously authored book published by Active/Elephant Editions. It tries relating Nietzschean ideas to anarchism (also pointing out their influence on certain anarchists, e.g. Goldman and Rocker). Not that knowledgeable about Nietzsche myself. I don't think the author has a very good understanding of anarchist communism, however, with passages like these:

Quote:
Anarchy, as I understand it, means: no domination. No rulers, and no slaves. For Nietzsche, this is a laughable idea. Many would agree with him. Nietzsche thinks: every project that presents itself as a project of freedom is really just another project of domination in disguise – if it succeeds in overcoming the stronger forces that are currently dominating it, it will become a new tyrant in turn. Just look at the histories of christianity, democracy, socialism, or whatever other social movement.

https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/shahin-nietzsche-and-anarchy
https://www.akpress.org/nietzscheandanarchy.html

wojtek
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Jun 5 2018 21:30

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-44022004

wojtek
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Dec 10 2018 16:40

Anyone read this already?
https://deepvellum.org/product/the-anarchist-who-shared-my-name/

cactus9
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Dec 14 2018 16:26

I'm just reading "Hired", it's about low wage Britain. The 1st chapter is very good.

blackrails
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Dec 14 2018 22:46

I quite recently read ’New Forms of Worker Organization: The Syndicalist and Autonomist Restoration of Class-Struggle Unionism’ by Ness/Lynd, and can recommend it.
It was a little scary to read the part about Russia and how their new-ish anti striking laws has affected the situation, since that’s happening here in Sweden now.

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jef costello
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Dec 15 2018 17:22

Rivethead - Ben Hamper. About working the assembly line at GM during the end of the peak days into the 80s. Pretty interesting stuff by a pretty interesting guy, even though there is still a fair bit of misogyny.

Neuromancer - William Gibson. This book is why every film has a ridiculous idea of what computer hacking is. That said the book is well worth a read, I've been reading a bit of older sci fi over the last year and enjoying it.

Dynamo - Tariq Goddard. I quite liked this, about the competition between the factory team and the secret police team. I feel like I've mentioned this before, the writer thinks the real story ahd a happy ending when the guy lost his whole family to the purges. Anyway the book is quite good. Worth a pound fromm a charity shop anyway.

zugzwang
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Jan 21 2019 07:08

I got a copy of Ken Knabb's Situationist International Anthology which I look forward to reading at some point.

I was also reading Kautsky's Economic Doctrines of Marx, which probably makes me a heretic and traitor, to supplement my re-reading of Marx's Capital. Does anyone know if this is actually worth reading or would it be better sticking with Heinrich's or someone else's intro to Capital? I don't see much issue with it as far as the section on commodities goes. Lenin apparently liked it as well according to the note on MIA (if that's what's trying to be said here):

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Despite Lenin’s denunciation of Kautsky this book was considered such an excellent introduction to its subject that it was still being used as a text-book at the Lenin School in Moscow in 1931. This translation is that of 1925 republished by the NCLC in 1936.

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Khawaga
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Jan 17 2019 00:01
Quote:
Does anyone know if this is actually worth reading or would it be better sticking with Heinrich's or someone else's intro to Capital?

Never hurts to read different interpretations of it. When I first read through Capital, I used Harvey's lectures, which I now have major issues with, but they still helped me. I am sure you'd get something out of Kautsky, though Heinrich's intro is the best (I do have issues with it, however, like how he spends only ten pages on all of Volume 2...).

zugzwang
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Jan 17 2019 23:15
Khawaga wrote:
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Does anyone know if this is actually worth reading or would it be better sticking with Heinrich's or someone else's intro to Capital?

Never hurts to read different interpretations of it. When I first read through Capital, I used Harvey's lectures, which I now have major issues with, but they still helped me. I am sure you'd get something out of Kautsky, though Heinrich's intro is the best (I do have issues with it, however, like how he spends only ten pages on all of Volume 2...).

What's wrong with his lectures exactly (something with this I guess)? I saw a few minutes of his video lectures and read his 17 Contradictions book; I think I took issue with his representation of anarchists at one point. It seems he has a new book on Capital out: A Companion to Marx's Capital: Complete Edition.

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Khawaga
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Jan 18 2019 00:18

Yes, I think the cristicuffs review is spot on. He just doesn't appreciate the value form or understand abstract labour at all, so on some very key concepts he just doesn't explain things at all. His understanding of the commodity fetish is off (as often happens, he confuses it for the money fetish) and in general doesn't seem to understand that all economic forms are fetishes that leads to inverted behaviour or skewed thinking. There was more, but it's been years ago since I listened to his lectures, so I can't remember. Still, I don't think they're bad (and in some parts are actually quite good for someone who is new to Marx's analysis), and I think one of Harvey's later books (the madness of economic reason) is quite good in explaining capital as a total system and how it leads to irrational behaviour.

Oh, I found 17 Contradictions to be a mixed bag; it is certainly not for a beginner, he rambles at times, uses strange examples, and the various chapters seems to fizzle out. He doesn't really explain what contradictions really are and how they are resolved, so again, like most of the stuff I've read by him, it's a mixed bag of some really good stuff and some stuff that will just confuse you.

Quote:
It seems he has a new book on Capital out: A Companion to Marx's Capital: Complete Edition.

Is it new or is it just the omnibus of the companions to Vol 1 and Vols 2 and 3?

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Agent of the In...
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Jan 18 2019 16:19
Khawaga wrote:
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It seems he has a new book on Capital out: A Companion to Marx's Capital: Complete Edition.

Is it new or is it just the omnibus of the companions to Vol 1 and Vols 2 and 3?

It's an omnibus, combining volumes one and two of A Companion to Marx's Capital. It's probably convenient if you prefer physical copies of books.

zugzwang
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Jan 21 2019 06:52
Khawaga wrote:
Yes, I think the cristicuffs review is spot on. He just doesn't appreciate the value form or understand abstract labour at all, so on some very key concepts he just doesn't explain things at all. His understanding of the commodity fetish is off (as often happens, he confuses it for the money fetish) and in general doesn't seem to understand that all economic forms are fetishes that leads to inverted behaviour or skewed thinking. There was more, but it's been years ago since I listened to his lectures, so I can't remember. Still, I don't think they're bad (and in some parts are actually quite good for someone who is new to Marx's analysis), and I think one of Harvey's later books (the madness of economic reason) is quite good in explaining capital as a total system and how it leads to irrational behaviour.

Thanks, I'll be wary of all that when I get to reading his Companion. I'm still enjoying the Kautsky book at the moment (still on part 1); I think it does a good job getting across ideas presented in Capital, especially with all the examples it uses. It feels like a lot of Marx's analysis is beginning to sink in, which I don't guess happens immediately after reading through Capital once (or Heinrich and others for that matter...).

This seems like a good description of commodity fetishism from Kautsky:

Quote:
As soon, however, as various kinds of work were carried on by individuals independently of each other, as soon, therefore, as production became planless, the relations of producers to each other appeared as the relations of products. Henceforth the determination of the relations of producers to each other no longer rested with themselves; these relations developed independently of the wills of men; the social powers grew over their heads. To the simple intelligences of past centuries they seemed to be divine powers, and to later enlightened centuries they seemed to be the powers of Nature.

The natural forms of commodities are now invested with qualities which seem to be mystical, in so far as they cannot be explained from the relations of producers to each other. Just as the fetish worshipper ascribed to his fetish qualities which had no existence in its natural constitution, so to bourgeois economy the community seems a sensuous thing endowed with supersensuous qualities. Marx calls this “the fetishism attaching to labour products when they present themselves as commodities – a fetishism which is inseparable from the mode of production."

zugzwang
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Jan 24 2019 15:29

The translation is a bit suspect though, not sure who Mary is:

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It is therefore understandable why Mary excluded merchant’s capital and interest-bearing capital from the first two volumes of Capital; these books are devoted to an analysis of the basic laws of capital.

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Jan 24 2019 19:30

What's a good book on the history of feminist ideas, one that explains the waves and different competing schools of thought that it encompasses? I guess I'm looking for something that is sort of academic but from a socialist perspective. I've read Feminism is for Everybody: Passionate Politics by bell hooks, which I thought was okay. It doesn't fit what I'm looking for though.

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jura
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Jan 24 2019 20:03

Lise Vogel's Marxism and the Oppression of Women covers the marxist part. It's not a history of feminism per se, though.

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R Totale
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Jan 25 2019 08:30

For socialist feminist history, you might want to try Sheila Rowbotham? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheila_Rowbotham

Not sure exactly what book'd best suit what you're looking for, but Hidden from History: 300 years of Women's Oppression and the Fight against it and/or The Past is Before Us: Feminism in Action since the 1960s might be relevant?

wojtek
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Mar 20 2019 04:23

New non-fiction writing from Sweden:
https://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/march-2019-sweden-kopparberg...

https://www.wordswithoutborders.org/article/march-2019-who-dreams-of-us-...

zugzwang
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Mar 21 2019 01:37

Goetia's "Capitalism is Awfully Nice" in Fifth Estate (basically deals with how everyone is inauthentic, phony kiss-asses under capitalism). Mostly rings true but I think it's lacking in its critique of capitalism. FE's politics generally are a mess (anarcho primitivist type stuff etc.; I don't think consistency in politics is really what they're going for to be fair) and nothing I'd really recommend.

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Sike
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Apr 2 2019 04:49

Any opinions about Otto Ruhle's abridged version of Capital? I've seen mixed opinions of it.

zugzwang
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Apr 28 2019 00:27
Sike wrote:
Any opinions about Otto Ruhle's abridged version of Capital? I've seen mixed opinions of it.

I'd be interested in that too.

Also if anyone has recommendations for guides/commentaries to volumes 2 and 3 of Capital i'd be very grateful. I was kind of looking for something like Cleaver's chapter-by-chapter commentary to volume 1 that he has here

http://la.utexas.edu/users/hcleaver/357k/357ksg.html

Raphael
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May 4 2019 17:53

I like Peter Kropotkin's The Conquest of Bread, Mark Bray's Antifa, Thomas Picketty's Capital in the 21st Century and Neil Faulkner's A Radical History of the World