What was the last film you watched? v3

1101 posts / 0 new
Last post
cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
Mar 23 2017 23:57

Angele et Tony - Beautiful French film about an unlikely love affair between Angele, recently released from prison for causing an accident that killed her husband and Tony, a fisherman. Beautifully shot, acted and directed. Subtle in the best possible way.

Kramer vs Kramer - Classic seventies film starring Meryl Streep and Dustin Hoffman about a divorce and the subsequent custody battle over their child. A great study of human communication and relationships only slightly marred by what I felt was a slight MRA subtext.

Beauty and the Beast - So far, so Freudian. Disney cement their brand for another generation with this epic retelling of the fairytale classic. Very enjoyable but with a touch too much royalty appreciation for me. If the servants sang one more time about how much they loved to serve I think I might have lost it right there in the cinema.

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
Mar 24 2017 21:12

Elle - A film that could only have been made by a man who really really hates women. It has some good bits, the storyline about the protagonist and her father is, at times, interesting, insightful and touching. The film is mostly notable for how much rape and sex it contains. See this film only if the idea of a rape film made by a man sounds like a good one to you.

Chilli Sauce's picture
Chilli Sauce
Offline
Joined: 5-10-07
Mar 24 2017 22:03

Saw Logan. Generally not an action fan, but I did love the X-Men when I was a kid so I keep up with the franchise. A bit hokey at times, but a legitimately well-done film. Bit weird to see Steven Merchant in there though, not really sure it worked.

Sike's picture
Sike
Offline
Joined: 25-10-15
Mar 25 2017 09:04

This has not been made yet so obviously I've not watched it but with Jake Gyllenhaal reportedly on board it looks as though it will indeed be made into a movie.

Anarchists Vs ISIS

It's said to be inspired by the recent Rolling Stone article by the same name.

I'll reserve judgement, but personally I'd be much more interested in seeing a movie about western anarchists aiding refugees of imperialist wars while combating racist xenophobia and militarism at home then one about anarchists traveling to far off lands and involving themselves in nationalist wars the context of which they often seem to know little about. I just hope that this movie doesn't promote the idea that anarchism is supportive of the imperialist ambitions of the US led international anti-IS coalition or the so-called 'war on terror'.

jef costello's picture
jef costello
Offline
Joined: 9-02-06
Mar 25 2017 09:18
Spikymike wrote:
Well I saw the 'Paterson' film at the cinema in December but I'm afraid it didn't grab me. There is a reasonable review I found later on this Trot site here: www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/01/03/pate-j03.html

I was going to watch it and then saw that it was by Jim Jarmusch. He cannot be forgiven for ghost dog.

Chilli Sauce wrote:
Jef, I really do think you've missed your calling as a film critic.

Maybe I should get a twitter...

potrokin wrote:
Submarine, it's a comedy film about a guy growing up in Wales in the 1980s, directed by Richard Ayoade. It was great.

Will check it out, just watched The Double

The Double : not a bad film although it basically strips out the whole psychological aspect from Dostoyevsky's story and sets up a world so weird that the character's bewilderment seems a little off. If you live in a kafkaesque nightmare then you'd probably takes things in your stride a little better.

Entdinglichung's picture
Entdinglichung
Offline
Joined: 2-07-08
Mar 30 2017 11:26

Der einsame Wanderer (The lonely wanderer) by Werner Philipp Sauber (1968), Sauber made this movie when he was a film student in Berlin. He was killed by the police 1975 being member of the 2nd June Movement, trying to set up a factory cell at the engineering plant Kloeckner-Humboldt-Deutz in Cologne, where he was working under a false identity ... the movie is from a period in which he was only starting to become engaged in radical politics and is considered by some critics as a masterpiece about alienation/solitude

Noa Rodman's picture
Noa Rodman
Offline
Joined: 4-11-09
Mar 30 2017 21:11

Sirocco (1951)

wiki wrote:
In 1925 Damascus, the Syrians are engaged in a guerrilla war against the French rule of Syria. Harry Smith (Humphrey Bogart) is an amoral American black marketeer secretly selling them weapons. As the situation deteriorates, French General LaSalle (Everett Sloane) orders that civilians be executed each time his soldiers are killed, but his head of military intelligence, Colonel Feroud (Lee J. Cobb), persuades him to rescind the plan.

Finally found it online, but nothing special.

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
Apr 5 2017 17:27

Who's gonna love me now? A documentary about Saar, a gay man from Israel living in London, dealing with the fall-out of living with AIDS and his family's reaction to this. It's really good. Definitely see it, take some tissues. It's very thought-provoking.

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
Apr 8 2017 21:06

The Olive Tree - great little vaguely activism themed Spanish film about a woman who travels to Dusseldorf to get back an olive tree that her family sold and which she believes will help her grandfather who has dementia. Laugh out loud funny but also very touching and very inspiring.

Reddebrek's picture
Reddebrek
Offline
Joined: 4-01-12
Apr 10 2017 19:09

A Sinner in Mecca by Parvez Shama. A short documentary of a gay muslim attending Hajj recording footage using an Iphone. Its very interesting, it shows quite a lot of what Mecca is like and how the Hajj is run.

Its not the best shot film I've ever seen but that comes with the territory of undercover filming. It also shows some of the really nasty features of the Saudi regime, the destruction of Islamic historical sites, the public executions and having a massive shopping mall less than a kilometer away from the Kabaa.

The footage was a bit light, its 70 minutes long but had to use homemovies of the directors married life in the US to reach it. I'd have preferred less of that and more information on the foundation of Wahhabi Islam and the Saudi Kingdom. We get a few details on that but not much.

Oh and at the end of the film a goat is ritually sacrificed. I recommend watching it though you might want to turn it off at the final five minutes or so.

jef costello's picture
jef costello
Offline
Joined: 9-02-06
Apr 21 2017 18:07

A box came to Brooklyn - very stagey short film about paranoia erupting in a small neighbourhood in Brooklyn when a mysterious box is left in the street. The actors are a bit self-conscious and at the end they get very anvilicious.

Also watched Rogue One and The force awakens. Pretty much like watching the first star wars twice more, nothing bad but it neither grabbed my atention.

Edit: also watched a The Millenial Dream which seems to be some kind of advert for millenials as well as a propaganda piece to argue that it isn't really that bad for them.

Fleur
Offline
Joined: 21-02-12
Apr 21 2017 22:54

Get Out, directed by Jordan Peele.
Excellent horror movie, genuinely creepy, don't trust rich white people. Ever.

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
May 5 2017 21:48

The Levelling - beautiful film set in Somerset a few months after the floods. Clover returns home to the family farm after the death of her brother. A stunning human story but I also felt like it was a really important film about the politics of the countryside.

Auld-bod's picture
Auld-bod
Offline
Joined: 9-07-11
May 7 2017 16:06

‘The Lunchbox’ (2013), is set in present day Mumbai and is a mix of Hindi and English. It is a modest light drama, which has lots of detail of life in the city and the scenes of cooking will make your mouth water. I wanted it to go on, as it appears to circle round the question: can the wrong train get you to the right station? I enjoyed it.

petey
Offline
Joined: 13-10-05
May 7 2017 16:42
Reddebrek wrote:
A Sinner in Mecca by Parvez Shama. A short documentary of a gay muslim attending Hajj recording footage using an Iphone. Its very interesting, it shows quite a lot of what Mecca is like and how the Hajj is run.

Its not the best shot film I've ever seen but that comes with the territory of undercover filming. It also shows some of the really nasty features of the Saudi regime, the destruction of Islamic historical sites, the public executions and having a massive shopping mall less than a kilometer away from the Kabaa.

The footage was a bit light, its 70 minutes long but had to use homemovies of the directors married life in the US to reach it. I'd have preferred less of that and more information on the foundation of Wahhabi Islam and the Saudi Kingdom. We get a few details on that but not much.

Oh and at the end of the film a goat is ritually sacrificed. I recommend watching it though you might want to turn it off at the final five minutes or so.

this sounds fascinating.
still in theaters, apparently, not yet on video.

petey
Offline
Joined: 13-10-05
May 7 2017 16:43
Fleur wrote:
don't trust rich white people. Ever.

understood. grin

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
May 7 2017 19:32

Citizen Jane: Battle for the city. Documentary about Jane Jacobs, writer and activist who wrote a book called The Life and Death of Great American Cities. A fascinating film about urban planning, even if that sounds like a bit of an oxymoron.

Khawaga's picture
Khawaga
Offline
Joined: 7-08-06
May 7 2017 20:08
cactus9 wrote:
Citizen Jane: Battle for the city. Documentary about Jane Jacobs, writer and activist who wrote a book called The Life and Death of Great American Cities. A fascinating film about urban planning, even if that sounds like a bit of an oxymoron.

Not at all, I find urban planning fascinating, especially in cities where there is informal sprawls (like Cairo).

Fleur
Offline
Joined: 21-02-12
May 7 2017 20:18
Quote:
Not at all, I find urban planning fascinating

Same, but I am regarded as a bit of a nerd at times smile

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
May 7 2017 22:53

See this film!

jef costello's picture
jef costello
Offline
Joined: 9-02-06
May 9 2017 12:36

Colossal, not at all what I was expecting. Not really a comedy, especially once it gets going, in spite of its extremely silly premise. Anne Hathaway is an alcoholic who moves back to her hometown and when she goes to the park a monster starts destroying Seoul, turns out the monster symbolises something but not quite what I expected. It wasn't too bad but it wasn't compellling.

Hot Rod, amusing film, an affectionate spoof of 80s movies about Andy Sambereg as a man-child obsessed with being a stuntman and beating his stepfather in a fight who then needs to raise 50 grand to save the stepdad's life.

Serge Forward's picture
Serge Forward
Offline
Joined: 14-01-04
May 9 2017 21:50

Hunt for the wilderpeople.

Noa Rodman's picture
Noa Rodman
Offline
Joined: 4-11-09
May 15 2017 12:30

The Tall Man (2012)

IMDB reviewer (spoiler) wrote:
As a spectator we are until the end encouraged to empathize with the main character, Jessica Biel, who snatches kids from 'white trash' parents to deliver them to more privileged foster parents, all of this for the good of human kind.

What's disturbing is that, viewers with not enough critical thinking can easily be led to see the children snatcher as a genuine hero who sacrifices her own life for the common good.

First Biel is presented as a hero, then definitely a moral monster, though at the end indeed possibly again hero (so I agree with the reviewer's basic point).

Biel is jailed for life by falsely confessing that she murdered the children (feigning a kind of madness, she tells that by killing them she saved them – at that point we do believe she is a monster), whereas in fact she 'merely' abducted them for an adoption-network and thus "really" saved them (from a life of misery).

She sacrifices herself by falsely confessing to "saving-killing" the children, in order to "really" save the children.

A false confession to this crime is rare, although in a BBC-documentary on child sacrifice in Uganda the shamans did exaggerate their victims in order to seem more dangerous. Perhaps the principle is the same as in Dzerzhinsky's Cheka which published false numbers of executions, just to inspire terror but without actual killing.

There are abuses with adoption-networks, but the particular false confession in this movie is non-existent in real life, so that to ponder on its psychological motivation or morality is an academic exercise (clearly it'd be horrendous to the parents who think their child has been killed). Regarding false confession (or forsaking proper self-defense) in general though, it is a most serious crime itself.

potrokin
Offline
Joined: 28-05-16
May 15 2017 20:11
Serge Forward wrote:
Hunt for the wilderpeople.

A great film. I laughed throughout.

potrokin
Offline
Joined: 28-05-16
May 15 2017 20:12
Auld-bod wrote:
‘The Lunchbox’ (2013), is set in present day Mumbai and is a mix of Hindi and English. It is a modest light drama, which has lots of detail of life in the city and the scenes of cooking will make your mouth water. I wanted it to go on, as it appears to circle round the question: can the wrong train get you to the right station? I enjoyed it.

A nice film. I enjoyed it too.

potrokin
Offline
Joined: 28-05-16
May 28 2017 19:14
jef costello wrote:
A box came to Brooklyn - very stagey short film about paranoia erupting in a small neighbourhood in Brooklyn when a mysterious box is left in the street. The actors are a bit self-conscious and at the end they get very anvilicious.

I enjoyed this film and it has a good message I feel.

cactus9
Offline
Joined: 9-12-14
May 25 2017 23:27

Colossal. Do not see this film unless you are extremely high. I have also seen Their Finest recently which was also terrible. For such a wonderful actor Bill Nighy certainly guarantees a turkey every time he appears in a film.

Spikymike
Offline
Joined: 6-01-07
May 26 2017 10:10

My partner and I watched Rahul Jain's short film 'Machines' a 'fly on the wall' ducumentary about the poorly paid, monotonous and hazardous working conditions in an Indian textile factory where ageing machinery is run into the ground and the only really high tech stuff is the bosses computer run surveillance of his workers. Pretty depressing really but would make a good basis for a more political discussion group with lots of issues hinted at in the various comments from both workers and bosses.
Found a short review here but maybe others around:
www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/machines-958481

Noah Fence's picture
Noah Fence
Offline
Joined: 18-12-12
May 26 2017 12:38

Finally watched Reds, I thought it was great although the Emma Goldman character was different to the picture of her character that I had in my mind. I actually liked the cynicism of Eugene and after all, he was pretty much right in being pessimistic. When I talked about this with another Libcommer I was informed that I'm an asshole if I like him!

I'm going to see The Hippopotamus when it comes out. To say I can't bear Stephan Fry would be a gross understatement but the book from which the film is taken is such a brilliantly bawdy, vulgar and puerile romp that I simply have to check it out.

Warboats's picture
Warboats
Offline
Joined: 12-05-17
May 28 2017 17:31

I just watched Blame! on Netflix, I was so excited when it came out because I'd read the manga a long time ago (excuse me if I sound like a weeabo) and it really left an impression on me. The film wasn't as good as I expected, but they got the atmosphere right.