What history are you reading?

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Kdog
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Dec 28 2007 23:53

Race, Class & Workers Insurgency by James A. Geschwender. On the League of Revolutionary Black Workers - by a white sociologist whio was in study groups with some of the founders. Better than the more famous Detroit, I Do Mind Dying. But like, Detroit, manages to take the side of the marxist-intellectuals against the nationalist-workers in the split.

Better yet Muhammad Ahmad's new We Will Return in the Whirlwind: Black Radical Organizations - 1960 1975 a history of RAM, SNCC, the Panthers and DRUM/LRBW.

Also gotta mention I've become obsessed with Walter Mosley's "Easy" Rawlins detective series.

Mike Harman
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Dec 29 2007 00:10

Year of Fire, Year of Ash - Baruch Hirson (on South Africa '76).

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syndicalistcat
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Dec 29 2007 01:27
Quote:
Strike is good, however Brecher apparently removed the councilist/anti-union angle from the later edition (circa 2000, original was 72). Hardly surprising given he's now part of Michael Albert's little gang of utopian social democratic losers.

Brecher's views are I think further to the right than Albert. It seems he's given up altogether on the idea of replacing capitalism. Albert still considers himself a revolutionary.

I've been re-reading "Workers Control in America" by David Montgomery, "An Auto Worker's Journal" by Frank Marquart, "Prophets of Order" by Don Stabile, and "Labor and Monopoly Capital" by Harry Braverman. I'm writing a piece on the early beginnings of taylorism and the corporate form of capitalism in the early 1900s, and the emergence of the "new class" of corporate techno-crats.

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Hieronymous
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Jan 1 2008 22:30
Kdog wrote:
Race, Class & Workers Insurgency by James A. Geschwender. On the League of Revolutionary Black Workers - by a white sociologist whio was in study groups with some of the founders.

It was interesting to read in Geschwender's book about how nearly everyone in LRBW was also a Panther. How does Ahmad describe this connection?

severin
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Jan 1 2008 23:09

Reading 'Flowers in the Dustbin: Culture, Anarchy and Postwar England'

by Neil Nehring.

Awesome text with a strong libertarian communist perspective, cites many many libertarian marxist, situationist and anarchist sources in an analysis of British working class youth culture.

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Kdog
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Jan 2 2008 05:15
Hieronymous wrote:
Kdog wrote:
Race, Class & Workers Insurgency by James A. Geschwender. On the League of Revolutionary Black Workers - by a white sociologist who was in study groups with some of the founders.

It was interesting to read in Geschwender's book about how nearly everyone in LRBW was also a Panther. How does Ahmad describe this connection?

I think its pretty well agreed in both that the Panther chapter in Detroit was opened up by League to prevent a competitive relationship from developing. It was not the organizational rivalry they feared - tho there might have been some of that, and justifiably too - but the strategic/political differences. The League saw the Panthers' embrace of the lumpen sections of the class, and their spectacular show of firearms, etc. as a big mistake. At the same time they saw that the Panthers had really struck a chord among Black youth. There was gonna be Panthers in Detroit sooner or later, so they decided to initiate the chapter to evxert influence/control.

Ahmad does point out the relationship his organization, RAM, had with the founders and activists in not only the Panthers and DRUM but also SNCC. He might overemphasize the importance of RAM to both groups.

solidarity,

K.

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Anarchia
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Jan 2 2008 06:02

Finished Subversion Of Politics a few weeks back, was really disappointed, thought it was fairly crap. Really interesting topic, but piss-poor writing and piss-poor analysis by Katsiaficas.

Also recently read The Unknown Revolution by Voline finally - had read excerpts before but never the whole thing. Well worth reading, I thought.

Will be moving on soon to Anarchism - A Documentary History Of Libertarian Ideas, edited by Robert Graham. Looks fairly similar to No Gods No Masters edited by Guerin, which I read and enjoyed, but the Graham one has sections on Japan, China and Korea which I'm really looking forward to, as I've never read much about anarchism in Asia before.

Also just finished a pamphlet called Honor America - The nature of fascism, historic struggles against it and a strategy for today by Stanley Arinowitz, which was published in 1970. Was amusing, but didnt really say much...

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Global Dissident
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Jan 5 2008 22:40

Over the holidays I read The Society of the Spectecle, Che's Guerilla Warfare and a little anthology of "Revolutionary writings" from Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Vaclav Havel. Next I'm reading Johnny Got His Gun and The Conquest of Bread after that.

heartskat
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Jan 8 2008 12:55

"Historical Introduction to Law" by André Castaldo, Dalloz editions.

MalFunction
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Jan 8 2008 13:18

Just bought a bundle of copies of history workshop journal from the 1990s

to add to the pile of one-day-i'll read-these items.

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Nate
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Jan 10 2008 08:21

Tidal Wave, by Sara Evans, it's a history of feminism in the US in the 1960s-1970s mostly. Just started it.

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Hieronymous
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Jan 12 2008 20:23
Kdog wrote:
Muhammad Ahmad's new We Will Return in the Whirlwind: Black Radical Organizations - 1960 1975 a history of RAM, SNCC, the Panthers and DRUM/LRBW.

Yo Kdog,

Thanks for suggesting this. I just picked it up and started reading it and it looks great.