Israel/Palestine social protests

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IlanS
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Aug 9 2011 14:33

Tojiah
"Some of my facebook friends, the more radical leftist ones, are negative about the main Rothschild Boulevard protest, at least. The main complaint is the current unwillingness of the majority of them to connect with previous, mostly non-Jewish housing struggles."

They are probably immature comrades of our Tel Aviv anarchist scene who do not have yet understanding of the contribution of partial/specific struggle within the present system on the revolutionizing of people.

If you look on the way the things changed from a two dozen or so protesting dwelling less than a month ago into state wide including Palestinians for social justice in all the spectrum.

Protesters clearly oppose the neo-liberalism. They prefer direct democracy over older politics... and you better do not question too much the wisdom of those leading it.

It is well known that majority of secular Jews are for end of occupation. Most of them because it cost too much money and blood.

When the strategy is the demand for social justice from the present government, the call for the end of occupation is like striking workers calling/trying to force a capitalist to transform the workplace to a cooperative.

Samotnaf

"btw, just before the war with Lebanon in '82, wasn't there a big "black panther" movement amongst young Sephardi Jews in Israel...? Do you think that that influenced the Israeli state to go to war at that time ?"

The Israeli "black panther" movement started from interaction between Israel libertarian Marxist/communist Matzpen youth around stolen musical records by Musrara Mizragi Youth 1970. It developed with our involvement and encouragement... till they were co-opted after few years.

Tojiah
"wasn't there a massive social movement of non European Sephardi jews in Israel in the months (perhaps as much as 20 months) before the war in Lebanon; I can't believe I imagined it - I know I smoked a lot of wacky backy back then, but I don't think I drifted that far away from reality..."

There was not any serious ferment within the Sephardi jews since the "black panther". There were from time to time a localized protest that never collected momentum.

The 1982 war was a mean to disperse the PLO power in Lebanon.

The serious anarchists against the wall initiative (all within the PGA spectrum but not all self labeled anarchists) involve (in parallel to the joint struggles in th 1967 regions) mainly with the Jaffa tent camp and the Lewinsky one.

The last report is there are nearly 1200 tents in the Tel Aviv camps.

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Alf
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Aug 9 2011 13:14

Article now on website. It owes a lot to the discussions and links posted on this thread

http://en.internationalism.org/icconline/2011/08/social-protests-israel

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Aug 9 2011 13:17
IlanS wrote:
Tojiah
"Some of my facebook friends, the more radical leftist ones, are negative about the main Rothschild Boulevard protest, at least. The main complaint is the current unwillingness of the majority of them to connect with previous, mostly non-Jewish housing struggles."

They are probably immature comrades of our Tel Aviv anarchist scene who do not have yet understanding of the contribution of partial/specific struggle within the present system on the

Well, this was a few weeks ago. I think many of them have changed their mind, and they seem to take it more seriously now, so your disparaging remarks are really kind of inappropriate.

IlanS wrote:
Tojiah
"wasn't there a massive social movement of non European Sephardi jews in Israel in the months (perhaps as much as 20 months) before the war in Lebanon; I can't believe I imagined it - I know I smoked a lot of wacky backy back then, but I don't think I drifted that far away from reality..."

You are misattributing this to me; this was by Samotnaf.

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Aug 9 2011 18:39

Ilan - are you in Israel?

PM me if you don't want to answer here

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Aug 9 2011 17:33
Mark wrote:
Angry Arab has a comment here that is pretty bad - particularly as he identifies as an anarchist of sorts.

Yeah, I saw that one. First time I read about the "Revolution of sons of Dogs". Despicable. The Angry Arab is pretty decent on the Arab world, but on Israel he is lobotimzied. He's a typical lefts that parrots the zionist dictum of Israel being an exception. In Angry Arab's view Palestine always is the exception; he e.g. will frequently say that he hates all flags, all nations, but for Palestine he makes an exception. It becomes quite sickening after awhile, but his blog is still a good source on all other things Arab (especially his commentary on al-Jazeera has been really good during the Arab Spring).

Mark.
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Aug 9 2011 22:03
Alf wrote:
Article now on website. It owes a lot to the discussions and links posted on this thread

http://en.internationalism.org/icconline/2011/08/social-protests-israel

The article seems pretty good to me.

-----

From +972:

J14 gets Israeli expats to take another look at homeland

“The revolution of the young”: Arab author addresses 300k rally

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Alf
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Aug 10 2011 09:55

Thanks Mark. Keep up the good work of providing links and info.

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IlanS
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Aug 10 2011 14:12

You can read my take on the uprising at:
Revolt in Israel - saying no to neoliberalism
http://www.anarkismo.net/article/20262

rooieravotr
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Aug 11 2011 04:21

Awful statement by Angry Arab

Quote:
You want me to be impressed with your protests over rent? I am never impressed with anything you do, but maybe you can impress somebody else if you protest the fact that you--YOU THE PROTESTERS--are occupying buildings that you stole by force from Palestinians and that you--YOU THE PROTESTERS--are protesting over a land that you stole by force. You never are bothered by the consecutive massacres that you--YOU THE PROTESTERS--perpetrate in your national army. There is only conflict between you and us: only conflict.

and

Quote:
But the conflict will continue: It will only end by the end of that Zionist entity and an end to the occupation of Palestine. And once the Palestinian refugees are returned to their homes all over Palestine, I will make sure that you get decent rents in the formerly Palestinian refugee camps because we may be a bit short of space for the occupiers then.

This is blaming the whole Israeli population for the crimes of their rulers and their predecessors. And it is a call for deportation of a rather large part of the population, to put it mildly. It is horrifying to read.

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Aug 11 2011 04:54

Maybe we should ignore him until he stops working for the State occupying Alta California for the American colonialist government.

Mark.
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Aug 11 2011 11:15
Quote:
#Tent48 #J14 Updated Arab tents list: Nazareth, Baka Elgarbeyah, Sakhnin, Arrabeh, Jaljulyi, Haifa, Jaffa, Jerusalem (students dorms), Hurfesh, Julis-Yerka, Majd Elkrom, Um Elfahem, Nakab, and more to come!

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Tent-No-1948/145119862236730

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Quote:
Protests against the rising costs of living marched on Wednesday in several cities across Israel. In Holon, protesters in the Jesse Cohen neighborhood burned tires and blocked roads after city inspectors ordered them to dismantle their tent compound within 24 hours. Most of the people occupying the tents are homeless.

The residents' representative, Nissan Zacharia, criticized the municipality's decision to clear the encampment. "A small match can ignite everything here," he said, adding that if the tents are dismantled "[Holon] will become like London, and it will be the mayor's responsibility." [edit: more on Holon here]

[…]

In Wadi Nisnas in Haifa 200 protesters marched chanting the usual slogan – "the people want social justice" – but in Arabic. This was the first protests organized by Haifa's Arab community, which constitutes ten percent of the city's population.

Activists in other cities has been discussing whether the protest is political. Among these protesters in Haifa, the answer was clear, as they chanted, "The occupation is a disaster, it serves the tycoons," and "money should be given to neighborhoods, not settlements."

33-year-old Raja Za'atra, who organized Wadi Nisnas's tent city, said the protest is part of the nation-wide movement, but also seeks to highlight the specific problems facing the Arab sector. "The banks won't give mortgages to people who want to buy an apartment," he said. "In the case of the Arab population, the supply is limited and the prices keep rising." He added that there is also a shortage of kindergartens and schools for the Arab population…

http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/marches-held-across-israel-as-social-protests-enter-fourth-week-1.378052

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http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/south-tel-aviv-social-protest-camp-celebrates-inter-ethnic-solidarity-1.377976

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Quote:
A guillotine, the symbol of the French Revolution, has been placed Wednesday in the center of Tel Aviv's "tent city," turning into one of the biggest attractions in this ongoing social protest.

The surprising display arrived in Rothschild Boulevard following another long night of protests across the country, this time focusing on contractor conditions. Demonstrators in five different cities participated in rallies Wednesday night against working conditions, wearing white masks and chanting: "Contractor companies are organized crime."

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4107640,00.html

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J14 facebook page (in English)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tent-City-Israel-English/218844531499499?sk=wall

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Aug 11 2011 19:07

More racist nonsense from the government employee of the American colonial authorities in occupied Alta California:

Angry Arab wrote:
It is anti-Semitic to receive Israeli bullets in your chests
This is hilarious. Zionist hoodlums and Israeli propagandists (well, they are the same so I am being redundant here) are turning the fight against real anti-Semitism into a joke. Look at this? They claim that calling Israeli protest "Revolution of the Sons of a Dog" is anti-Semitic? How exactly? What am I missing? In the Arab world, "son of a dog" is a common insult and not reserved to one particular group. So there is nothing anti-Semitic in referring to Israeli Revolution of the Sons of a Dog as Revolution of the Sons of a Dog. OK? Those Zionist hoodlums are so out of it: they will tell us tomorrow it is anti-Semitic to resist Israeli occupation. Tell them to go play in the garden.

link

Mark.
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Aug 11 2011 22:43

+972: Why haven’t I pitched a tent?

Mark.
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Aug 11 2011 23:21

These videos are from early last week and so not up to date but are still worth watching.

Mark.
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Aug 12 2011 10:46

Mass social protests to take place in 11 Israeli cities on Saturday

Quote:
For the first time since the beginning of the social protests that have swept Israel over the past month, protesters will not be gathering for a march in Tel Aviv on Saturday evening, and instead protests will take place in at least 11 other cities across the country.

The main events will take place in Be’er Sheva and Afula. Activists are also preparing for marches in Eilat, Dimona, Modi’in, Petah Tikva, Ramat Hasharon, Hod Hasharon, Netanya, Haifa and Beit Sha’an.

[…]

“The idea is a general expression of solidarity with the different tent city protest sites in the country,” said Yonatan Levi, one of the protest leaders. “It is important to us to gather support for the tent cities, some of which have received less attention. It is also important to gather attention to the tent protest sites in the periphery, where the sites that the tent cities have sprung up in are dealing with serious problems and years of neglect,” he added...

Activists hope for biggest protest ever seen in Israel's south

Protests force Israel to confront wealth gap

Mark.
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Aug 13 2011 17:46

From Puerto del Sol to Tahrir Square

Quote:
Matan Kaminer is an Israeli radical left activist and an MA student in anthropology at Tel Aviv University. He is currently active in organizing the protest encampment at Levinsky (HaKavkazim) Park in Tel Aviv, where native Israelis, migrants and refugees have joined forces.

Interviewer: Wladek Flakin, Junge Welt

03.08.11

Back in March, Israeli Premier said that, in contrast to virtually every other country in the Middle East, there would be no protests in Israel. But last Saturday, up to 150,000 people went out onto the streets demanding social justice, the largest social movement for many years. What is the social background of this movement?

First of all I should say that this explosion was totally, totally unexpected. If you had asked any radical in Israel three weeks ago what the chances were of a gigantic wave of social protest – you would have gotten laughed at. This is totally unprecedented and unpredicted. That said, in retrospect it’s obvious that the main trigger was the collapse of economic horizons for the younger generation of the middle class. All of a sudden people realized that their woes weren’t a personal failing but a consequence of the system. And then they rebelled. It was only later that the poor and disadvantaged among the Jewish population joined in. And now, the Palestinian minority is making its first steps to join the movement – on its own terms.

This protest movement began with a tent city on the Rothschild Avenue in Tel Aviv, very similar to the tent cities at the Puerta del Sol in Madrid or the Midan at-Tahrir in Cairo. Do the young Israeli demonstrators see themselves as part of an international movement?

Yes, definitely. Everybody’s talking about Cairo, and above the assembly area on Rothschild there hangs a large sign saying “Rothschild corner of Tahrir”. In terms of the actual forms of protest and organization I imagine we’re closer to Madrid – one of the most important organizers in Rothschild is Aya Shushan, who spent the previous months in Spain on the plazas. But it’s important to emphasize that in the Israeli context, taking an idea about protest or even revolution from an Arab country isn’t a trivial matter. The solidarity implied here with the peoples of the Middle East is perhaps the most potentially revolutionary aspect of the movement.

In the last year, Israel has experienced a number of important strikes. Are workers participating in this movement, or is it mostly middle-class youth (as many right-wing commentators claim)?

It depends what you mean by workers and middle class. Israel has a post-Fordist service economy. The important strikes in the last year have been initiated by the new, militant trade union federation, Koah LaOvdim (Power to the Workers), and most of its unions are in services – from home day care workers to Open University lecturers. The one exception is Haifa Chemicals, a big industrial establishment which is on strike now. From what I hear, the workers there are taking an active part in the movement in Haifa. But “the working class” is not a category that people identify with and act as part of (as opposed to “the middle class” – somewhat like in the US). The struggle has not taken up the issue of work relations, with two exceptions: one is a demand to raise the minimum wage. The other is solidarity with public sector workers like doctors and teachers who are perceived as working for the general good.

Ofer Eini, the leader of the largest trade union Histadrut, said on Monday that he would not support the protests if their goal was to bring down the Netenyahu government. On the other hand, many demonstrators took up the chant: “Mubarak, Assad, Netanyahu!” Does the movement aim to bring down the government?

I saw a sign saying that, but I haven’t heard anybody chanting the slogan. The movement is split on the question of whether to call for Netanyahu’s resignation, mainly because people are afraid of being “political”. That may sound bizarre in this context, but in Israel “political” has two connotations that are relevant in this context. One is the idea of being involved in parliamentary wheedling, which is very much out of favor. The other, of course, is taking a stand on issues relating to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

One sign at a demonstration read: “Build apartments, not settlements!” Have the protestors been connecting the social question to the question of the occupation of the Palestinian territories?

Making this connection is not as straightforward as the question makes it sound. Of course, on a moral level one can say that “a wrong against one is a wrong against all” and that therefore any demand for “social justice” leads directly to opposing the occupation. But that logic is a bit too abstract. Some Palestinian activists have been voicing concerns that the demands of the protesters will be met at the expense of the Palestinians – by more land expropriations for example. In this context it is important to emphasize that if Jewish Israelis were willing to actively participate in the colonization process, in the West Bank as well as in the Negev and Galilee, then there would be no housing problem. Our extreme-right government would be happy to subsidize them. There is an implicit refusal to play that game in the current protest. This refusal is not idealistic or altruistic, but it is nevertheless there.

A whole different dynamic is based in the fear that the government will start a war or a mini-war with one of our neighbors in order to quell the rebellion. It is not out of the question – Assad, for one, would be happy to play this game with Bibi. A Facebook group called “Committed to continuing the protest even in the case of a military operation” set up yesterday already has 561 members, so there is some basis for hoping that the movement might turn anti-war for reasons of self-preservation.

But, these considerations aside, it has to be admitted that for the most part this movement has so far quite consciously kept its distance from the Palestinian issue. This is rapidly becoming untenable and dangerous. Yesterday the head of the Yesha Commission, which represents the settlements in the West Bank, visited the Rothschild encampment and was received cordially. While at first the right tried to isolate the protest by ascribing it to anarchists and left-wingers, the immense support it receives from all sectors of the public (excluding the settlers) has probably convinced them to try and take it over.

What role has the radical, anti-zionist left in Israel been playing in these protests?

Organizationally speaking, almost none. Prior to the rally in Tel Aviv last Saturday there was an attempt to organize a “radical bloc” which apparently faded away. Exceptions are Koah LaOvdim, which I mentioned above but is not “radical left” though many of its militants are, and Tarabut, a mostly Jewish component of Hadash/al-Jabhah (the mostly Palestinian-Israeli Democratic Front for Peace and Equality).

But as individuals and as a vibrant, well-connected network, the radical left has been amply involved. While some activists dismissed the movement early on, wary of the distance it has kept from the Palestinian issue, most have now jumped on the wagon – limited as it may be, this is the most exciting thing to have happened here in a generation. I think most of us are busy working the interstices, trying to articulate the causes of the working poor and the Palestinian minority with the struggle, as well as working to build democratic institutions within it. Things are happening of themselves, but we can use our connections and our experience to help them along.

Being a radical left activist in Israel is at most times a pretty depressing proposition. We act not out of belief that we can change anything, but rather out of the moral conviction that we cannot do otherwise. Now, suddenly, everything is open, and our activity can make a huge difference. There is something scary about that, but also something very very exciting. Let’s hope it holds.

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Aug 13 2011 18:24
Quote:
The important strikes in the last year have been initiated by the new, militant trade union federation, Koah LaOvdim (Power to the Workers), and most of its unions are in services – from home day care workers to Open University lecturers.

anyone know anything about this union?

Mark.
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Aug 13 2011 18:51

I hadn't heard of it before but a quick search produced this:

Quote:
“Koach La Ovdim – Democratic Workers’ Organization” is a new general trade union which unites workers from a variety of fields. The organization was founded in 2007 as an initiative of several leading activists in the field of workers’ rights and workers’ struggles and has been since growing rapidly, unionizing in its ranks thousands of workers. The Caregivers’ Union is one of the many branches of “Koach Laovdim.

Koach la ovdim aims are:

To assist unorganized workers in getting organized in their workplace both in the public and the private sector.

To promote the existence of organized labor in the Israeli economy.

To wage an uncompromising struggle in the defense of workers’ rights and the improvement of their pay and working conditions.

To work for the establishment of social and economic justice, a welfare state and industrial democracy.

The organization is based on a democratic structure in which the power is vested in the hands of the workers. “Koach La Ovdim” believes in social and economic equality, as well as equality between Men and Women, Jews and Arabs and all the sectors of Israeli society. As well as Nepali, Philipinies, Indian, Shrilankan and all the workers of other nationality…

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Aug 13 2011 18:56

Thanks Mark, but I had seen that. I was more interested if anyone had some more "insider" knowledge. Its aims seem pretty darn good for an Israeli union (at least compared to Histadrut), but I want to know how they've been in practice.

Mark.
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Aug 13 2011 21:09

The tent protests - Haifa

Quote:
The “tent protest” is spreading and getting larger by the day.


In the Haifa Arab neighborhood Wadi Nisnas, a number of tents have been set up on the roundabout at the entrance to the Wadi. The activists came up with their own local demands from the government, which include demand for attainable housing solutions for Haifa’s young Arabs, free education for all from kindergarten all the way to university, real development of Haifa’s Arab neighborhoods in cooperation with the residents, cancellation of the discriminating policy according to which no mortgage is granted for apartments and houses in Arab and weakened neighborhoods, cancellation of all discriminating criteria in mortgages, anchoring the right to education, health and welfare in law and making them basic rights that are granted free to all, cancellation of all discriminating criteria in the employment market and in higher education and, most important (to me at least), ending the occupation and directing resources and budgets to housing and social needs instead to settlements and militarism.

Yes, definitely a political protest. The connections have been made.

[…]

Anyway, I went to the demonstration in Wadi Nisnas yesterday. Though I was dead tired, it was important for me to be there. Because this is my protest also. It was very different from the demonstration in Horev Center two weeks ago. It felt much, much more political.

After that, we went to the Hadar Tent. This tent is different from the one in Carmel Center. In Carmel Center, they have “cultural” evenings. I haven’t been there myself, but I heard that they have poetry evenings, lectures on different issues, political discussions. And most of the tent people are activists. In Hadar, it’s not like that at all. I was there last night for about an hour. There were very few activists. Most of the people were residents of Hadar. One woman told us that she’d been living without electricity for nine months. Most of the people I saw are from the very lowest socio-economic strata. Children eating watermelon. Although I myself am struggling economically to survive, and feel that this protest is my personal protest, I couldn’t help but think of the differences between us.

It’s true, I’m probably considered lower middle class. I’ve got a Masters degree, got a good job (actually two part time jobs), stable income, a rented apartment, electricity and running water. I even have a swimming pool subscription. My teenage daughter doesn’t lack anything. And still. I feel that I am barely making ends meet. Still I have lots to complain about in terms of my economic situation. I can’t afford to buy an apartment, and I don’t have any substantial economic security-net. And so when I think of the woman who lives without electricity, I see my situation in a different light.

It’s important that this protest doesn’t leave anybody behind. Not the middle class, not the weakest socio-economic groups. The solutions have to be such that will enable dignified living for all groups. The voices of the weakened and the marginalized have to be heard and taken into consideration.

This is a social political protest. All encompassing. To meet the social needs of the different groups, including housing, health, education and welfare, resources need to be redirected to these issues. Both the public and the government know where these resources can be found – national security. So the first connection has been established. Now the second phase of redefining priorities, redefining concepts, redefining security.

Mark.
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Aug 14 2011 10:45

+972: 100,000 demonstrate across Israel as J14 leaves Tel Aviv

Quote:
Some 100,000 people, Arabs and Jews, demonstrated across Israel tonight, after the J14 movement decided to break with tradition and hold rallies in a dozen different locations instead of one central rally in Tel Aviv. The decision resulted in several protests breaking local records, with over 15,000 demonstrating in Beer Sheva, over 30,000 in Haifa, over 15,000 in Afula (population 40,000). Other locations included the Arab city of Nazareth, the blue-collar town of Or Yehouda, the commuter city of Modi’in, Beit Shemesh, Netanya, Rishon Letzion and many others.

While the protest in Jaffa, which has seen many clashes between police and protesters over the years, ended peacefully, in Or Yehouda some 500 people blocked the road and burned tires. One of the speakers at the Beer Sheva rally, a Negev Bedouin, said the J14 struggle was for everyone, and called on Arabs and Bedouin to join the protest.

While this week’s protest numbers fall far below last week’s 300,000, this is the first time a major political movement or campaign decides not to hold a rally in Tel Aviv at all and calls on everyone to demonstrate in their home towns. The organisers are still calling for a million-strong march in early September. They appear to be in no rush to begin talks with the government, preferring instead to set up mixed experts and protesters committees fleshing out various demands, including a committee on changing the system of election and governance in Israel.

Feminist Arab-Jewish blogger Lihi Yona posted on Facebook after attending one of the protests: “I’m just back form the Haifa demo… if I may, this was the most exciting experience I had in my life. The number of Arab women and men speaking to huge applause from the crowd made me believe there will be a just, equitable state here some day. [Author] Sami Michael, who chose to speak in both Arabic and Hebrew, and the Arab singer – and more importantly, the masses that rocked to that singer’s music – made this night the most amazing experience I ever had.”

“For years, I would feel the need to correct people when they’d say Haifa was a mixed city,” Yona told +972. “I would feel the need to point out that it’s not mixed, that it’s segregated. And tonight it really was an integrated city… there were more Arab speakers than Jews and each time someone would say, in Arabic, “Arabs and Jews,” the crowd understood and cheered them on.”

http://twitter.com/#!/Elizrael

Quote:
Thousands are here in Beer Sheva. Our radical group is quite big, including people from Tel Aviv, Jaffa, Beer Sheva and al-Arakib.

Leaving the protest now in a car full of far leftists. Organizers said 40,000 attended. I think we were around 30,000.

Best memory from tonight: Tens of thousands cheering to a speech by a female Bedouin activist who spoke about social justice for all.

Photos from Beer Sheva

Photo from Jaffa

Haaretz: Tens of thousands take to Israel's streets as social protests move out of Tel Aviv

Israel protests spread to 18 cities

Quote:
In Israel, anything that isn’t Tel Aviv or Jerusalem falls under the umbrella term “periphery.”

Sometimes the periphery is distant, in Israel’s miniature terms, such as the southernmost city of Eilat, on the Red Sea, a four hour drive from Tel Aviv. Other times, it can be next door. For organizers of Saturday’s protests in Israel “next door” in this case was literally next door: the Tel Aviv neighborhood of Jaffa, with its mixed Arab-Jewish population and the stunning 3,000-year-old port that Napoleon Bonaparte once ravaged.

“We’re the periphery of Tel Aviv,” said a few semi-embarrassed protesters on this night, the night Israel’s social protesters took over the nation’s streets, and pointedly not those of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.

Eighteen cities saw their downtown areas cordoned off and police deployed as 100,000 people took to the streets in the style that has become typical of these events: families, young people, pensioners peaceably but implacably gathering in central squares, blocking off main roads and shouting for “social justice.”

In the northern city of Haifa more than 30,000 people marched and gathered to hear the 85-year-old writer Sami Michael, an Iraqi-born onetime communist who taught himself Hebrew at the age of 45, laud the protesters for “coming together, Jew and Arab, poor and middle-class.”

In Be’er Sheba, the capital of the Negev, in southern Israel, legendary crooner Margalit Tzan’ani, (think of a Yemenite Dolly Parton with a little bit of Tine Turner thrown in) came to make amends after having insulted the Tel Aviv protesters in an unfortunate radio interview last week in which she referred to the young movement leaders as spoiled and gutless.

Meanwhile, as government spokesmen finally organized, after a month of demonstrations, to provide pro-Netanyahu spin in real time, the ones most at a loss this week seemed to be Israel’s political analysts, who display disbelief that the protests have yet to fizzle out.

An Israel Radio interviewer caught up with movement leader Daphne Leef, who chose to spend this Saturday night in the Afula march, to ask if the protest leadership hadn’t become ‘too dispersed.”

“Aren’t you asking for too many things? Don’t you think you need focus? What can you achieve like this?” he queried.

Leef, who is 25 years old, started the current civil strife in mid-July when she pitched a tent in the manicured center of Tel Aviv’s Rothschild Boulevard after being kicked out of her apartment, which was undergoing renovations.

“There are 15,000 people here,” she replied, amused. “I think we’re ok for now."

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Tojiah
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Aug 14 2011 01:53
Khawaga wrote:
Thanks Mark, but I had seen that. I was more interested if anyone had some more "insider" knowledge. Its aims seem pretty darn good for an Israeli union (at least compared to Histadrut), but I want to know how they've been in practice.

They've come up on libcom before. Here's an informative post by someone who no longer responds here as much.

Mark.
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Aug 14 2011 11:23
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Aug 14 2011 13:21

An activist - third generation in the left margin of the front of the Israeli Communist Party - which never retreated from its support for the establish of Israel 1948:

"Being a radical left activist in Israel is at most times a pretty depressing proposition. We act not out of belief that we can change anything, but rather out of the moral conviction that we cannot do otherwise. Now, suddenly, everything is open, and our activity can make a huge difference. There is something scary about that, but also something very very exciting. Let’s hope it holds."

The more radical activists of the PGA spectrum - including the anarchists against the wall are usually not depressing. As we do not have the urge to organize the working people frustrated.... We do our share to radicalize the people in every subject we have a chance to. We are in the struggle against the separation fence as partners - not as seldom CP leaders who come to give speech. We were with previous dwellers camps. We see in the consensus decision making and hands mode of discussion of the present uprising the underground currents of change we contribute to on the fly.

Mark.
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Aug 15 2011 21:04

From +972

Can J14 turn the tables for the progressive cause within Israel?

Quote:
The revolutionary social struggle taking place in Israel today is nearing a critical juncture: either it crumbles under the boot of “security needs” and racial segregation, or breaks free from all previous dogmas and reboots our political system

Arab-Israelis should find an ally in the Israeli tent protests

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The writer, a native of Jaffa, believes the current political unrest will bury the fanatical nationalism and extremism of Arabs in Israel, just as it will bury Jewish fanatical nationalism
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Tojiah
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Aug 16 2011 01:00

Yisrael Beiteinu MK: Tent organizers are like Palestinians

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The tent leaders’ demands are incoherent, and if we [the government] aren’t prepared with a clear plan, they will continue to approach us with new demands. This reminds me of negotiations with the Palestinians – because when the issues are not well-formulated, they constantly come back to us with new demands.

Palestinian-baiting. I do hope it will have the opposite effect.

Glenn Beck calls Israel social protesters 'communists'

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Glenn Beck, an American right-wing talk-show host currently visiting Israel, compared the Israeli protesters demanding social justice to communists in his show this week.

We can dream, can't we?

Mark.
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Aug 17 2011 22:30

+972 Podcast: The tent protests and beyond

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Khawaga
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Aug 18 2011 17:21

The terrorist attacks in Eilat and Israeli bombardment of Gaza couldn't have come at a worse point. I wonder how this will impact the protest movement...

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Aug 18 2011 21:34
Khawaga wrote:
The terrorist attacks in Eilat and Israeli bombardment of Gaza couldn't have come at a worse point. I wonder how this will impact the protest movement...

Speaking of which, what the hell is going on there right now? Gaza Youth Breaks Out is reporting that Egyptian soldiers died in an exchange of fire with Israelis. Also a rumor about exchange of fire on the Syrian-Israel border, and other various rumors circulating. Anyone know whatsup?

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Aug 18 2011 21:47
Quote:
The terrorist attacks in Eilat and Israeli bombardment of Gaza couldn't have come at a worse point. I wonder how this will impact the protest movement...

Guardian is reporting that the weekend protest has been cancelled 'to join families in their mourning'.