"Militarisation" of the police?

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Anonymous
Nov 14 2010 00:07
"Militarisation" of the police?

At the bottom of this article I found this:

Quote:
The controversy comes as police arrested a 57th person in connection with last week's student march through London, which ended in violent scenes. As police face continued criticism for failing to control the march, the Observer has learned that defence firms are working closely with UK armed forces and contemplating a "militarisation" strategy to counter the threat of civil disorder.

The trade group representing the military and security industry says firms are in negotiation with senior officers over possible orders for armoured vehicles, body scanners and better surveillance equipment.

The move coincides with government-backed attempts to introduce the use of unmanned spy drones throughout UK airspace, facilitating an expansion of covert surveillance that could provide intelligence on future demonstrations.

Derek Marshall, of the trade body Aerospace, Defence and Security (ADS), said that such drones could eventually replace police helicopters.

He added that military manufacturers had discussed police procurement policies with the government, as forces look to counter an identified threat of civil disobedience from political extremists.

Meanwhile police sources say they have detected an increase in the criminal intentions of political extremists and are monitoring "extreme leftwing activity" in light of last week's student protest.

The office of the National Co-ordinator for Domestic Extremism (NCDE) said it was feeding information to Scotland Yard's National Public Order Intelligence Unit, which holds a database of protest groups. NCDE, which in turn works closely with the Confidential Intelligence Unit that monitors political groups throughout the UK, said it had already recorded a rise in politically motivated disorder.

An NCDE insider said: "Over the past year there has been an increase in the criminal activity committed by such individuals but this is committed by a very small minority".

An internal Metropolitan police report is expected to be completed this week into why senior officers failed to anticipate the violence during last Wednesday's student demonstration.

This has got to be just shitting us up hasn't it? Or are the state really that scared?

anessen
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Nov 14 2010 00:38

I'm not sure if they're actually scared of us or they're just using this as an excuse.

Wellclose Square
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Nov 14 2010 00:42
Quote:
An NCDE insider said: "Over the past year there has been an increase in the criminal activity committed by such individuals but this is committed by a very small minority".

This 'small minority' must be the same as that identified by certain sections of the press (favoured by the attentions of the NCDE?) as being behind the 'mindless violence' at Millbank. Is there a script somewhere?

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Joseph Kay
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Nov 14 2010 00:46

Well state strategists have to be taking seriously the prospect at least of widespread unrest. on the other hand, the threat of it is a trump card for those with a vested interest in getting certain police projects funded...

raw
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Nov 14 2010 08:45

There has always been contingency plans for civil unrest and possible strategies to deal with sustained mass disorder - though putting that in an article in the context of something relatively minor like breaking a few windows is interesting.

As for the acts of violence over the last year they mention I assume it is stuff related to Smash EDO and the clandestine activities which has seen banks, government contractors and police stations being attacked by militants across the UK

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jef costello
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Nov 14 2010 08:55

I'd imagine this is the police trying to defend their budgets, makes you wonder about how unhappy they were to be caught off guard at the anti-education cuts demo. The armored vehincles thing maks it a touch unreal, no one could be stupid enough to imagine that those could be justified in any way.

Ariege
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Nov 14 2010 09:20

Actually I think that this debate is a little unreal. The state is not scared of a few kids breaking windows. Of course the police are going to overstate the threat posed by militants and of course Tory politicians are going to support militarisation of the police force. This is a win-win process for the arms industry; authoritarian politicians and police.

Quote:
no one could be stupid enough to imagine that those could be justified in any way

Oh yes they could, and they are. For large numbers of people almost no measure to control "militants" and "extremists" would be beyond the pale. The Daily Mail readers and their like, the main targets for authoritarian propaganda really would not care if the police had tanks and ran people over to control demo's.

Demonstrations like the student demo the other day are not only doomed to fail, they are defeatist. Who expects to change Government policy by such means? The people running the main event will be rising through the ranks of the Labour Party in a few years time and no doubt quite a few of the "anarchists" who caused trouble will be working in banks or call centres wondering how they could ever believe that they would change the world. A few young people have got themselves into hot water with the law for no good reason at all; their rage and violence has fed the monster not threatened it.

So, here comes another generation of marches and chants, of violence on the sidelines, and no prospect of advance or influence. When I was busy wasting time on demo's and actions the police had shields and cavalry, little cannisters of gas, loudspeakers and the CJA; in a few years time they'll have more body armour, surveillance drones and armoured vehicles. We will gain nothing like this; we will gain nothing by being party to this.

Baderneiro Miseravel
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Nov 14 2010 10:47

Ariege,

So what is your point, exactly?

Caiman del Barrio
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Nov 14 2010 10:58
Ariege wrote:
Demonstrations like the student demo the other day are not only doomed to fail, they are defeatist. Who expects to change Government policy by such means? The people running the main event will be rising through the ranks of the Labour Party in a few years time and no doubt quite a few of the "anarchists" who caused trouble will be working in banks or call centres wondering how they could ever believe that they would change the world. A few young people have got themselves into hot water with the law for no good reason at all; their rage and violence has fed the monster not threatened it.

So, here comes another generation of marches and chants, of violence on the sidelines, and no prospect of advance or influence. When I was busy wasting time on demo's and actions the police had shields and cavalry, little cannisters of gas, loudspeakers and the CJA; in a few years time they'll have more body armour, surveillance drones and armoured vehicles. We will gain nothing like this; we will gain nothing by being party to this.

While I sympathise with your highlighting of the tactical limits behind violent protest, you really need to cop the fuck on. 3,000 students (not anarchists, fuck, do you work for the Telegraph?) being furious enough to break police lines, smash windows and trash a govt HQ represents a serious escalation and it is something to be built on. I can only assume that you're very far from events cos all I can see is students talking, planning and organising a next, more substantial step. We've already seen post-demo occupations and now they're organising for a walkout in a couple of weeks. It's not just the Tories and Lib Dems who are shitting themselves, the NUS are severely compromised and the uni authorities are really starting to worry.

Let's see what we can do here, jesus...

Ariege
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Nov 14 2010 11:07

My point is that the militarisation of the police is not new, we should not be surprised by it, it makes perfect sense that a few kids involved in petulant protests should be used as an excuse to strengthen the state apparatus. People who are seriously concerned to change society should not get involved in smashing windows and chucking stuff at coppers because it does not improve our situation any; it is defeatist, bankrupt and childish, nihilistic and counter-productive.

The state will become better and better armed and spend more and more of a dwindling budget on policing people and each and every pretext will be used to hasten the project. This is the nature of the state.

We would be better served wondering how the hell we are going to get people to consider the ideas of the libertarian left than wondering how many people get arrested on another bloody doomed march or what gear the police will have next time. It is of no more concern to me than how many people got arrested the last time it kicked off at a football match.

Ariege
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Nov 14 2010 11:12

I did write "anarchists" not just anarchists.

I am a long way from the events, but I have seen some events in my time. I remain to be convinced that anything different will come from this. So go and prove me wrong; when the ephemeral radicalism of students starts the avalanche that topples the lot I shall pat you on the back and pass you a freshly looted Havana cigar.

Caiman del Barrio
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Nov 14 2010 11:28

I agree with many - most - of your criticisms. i think there has to be an awareness of the tactical limitations of stuff like Wednesday in the longterm. Indeed, check my - and others' - posts on the thread announcing the demo. I was proved wrong, which is nice. smile

What Goldsmiths UCU (woop woop) say is true though: the violence has forced the issue onto the front pages and it is now the burning issue in public discourse. Other workers facing the chop now have a reference point and a precedent (I've kept my politics very quiet where I am right now, but EVERYONE is discussing students and cuts generally as a result of Wed), and I think they'll be inspired by the students' militancy.

I also think that the students actually have a winnable battle here. The Lib Dems are beign hung out to dry by one of their most supportive demographics, which is in turn affecting the Tories in the coalition.

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Awesome Dude
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Nov 14 2010 11:59
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Other workers facing the chop now have a reference point and a precedent (I've kept my politics very quiet where I am right now, but EVERYONE is discussing students and cuts generally as a result of Wed), and I think they'll be inspired by the students' militancy.

I think that the most important outcome of Wednesday is that the societal wide 'consensus' around the inevitability of cuts and their absolute necessity, built by all three leading bourgeois parties, has been publicly and spectacularly smashed by a section.

There has been a terrible impasse: that there's nothing labour can do to stop the cuts (evident from continental workers disputes?). This has turned into a pessimistic refusal to actively fight the cuts thereby allowing the ruling class to efficiently impose it's unified agenda of unravelling the social wage.

Wednesday was not decisive. But it could mark the beginning where a section of the class hardest hit the cuts, the youth with rampant unemployment, begin to systematically confront the ruling class programme.

no1
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Nov 14 2010 12:39

I think almost everyone (politicos and non-politicos) will agree that breaking a few windows and trashing a place is not a tactic capable of 'stopping the cuts'. Yet a lot of the same people are quite excited about the 10/11/10 mini-riot, because it was a very effective way of breaking with the protest politics of the past few years and of upping the ante.

IMO it was a relatively conscious symbolic attack on the political elite and perhaps on this kind of political representation. Especially since the anti-war movement protest is constantly portrayed as being about 'letting politicians know what we think', political representatives go on about how they are doing their best to 'listen' and how we are totally different to places like Burma because here people are free to protest. However the line that's always drawn is that protest must not be disruptive or 'violent'. Even strikes are more and more being described as a way for workers to voice their disagreement with redundancies etc, with the BA strike being outlawed because it was going to be disruptive.

Quite a few people I talked to said how the mood at the demo had been quite exciting, but then at the end of the demo they all felt a bit down and asking themselves "is this it?". That's when text msg arrived from Millbank and a lot of people went there. People were fed up with the protest rituals of the past few years, and they made a break with it by crossing that line.
It seems like a lot of students are also pretty upset about voting for the LibDems and then being 'betrayed' about tuition fees, it does show what a fraud electoral politics are, and it does undermine the logic of protesting to let politicians know what you think.

The question is of course where things are going to go next. I think it's essential that anarchists and communists focus on deepening the break with representative politics, and argue in favour of self-organised struggle that is based on an understanding of how capitalism actually works. This sounds generic, but I think it's where we need to focus. For example I don't think it's a co-incidence that a lot of students are upset with NUS president Aaron Porter - representation is something that many people are asking themselves questions about. The danger is of course that the more militant leftists are going to replace the sell-out careerists now.

no1
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Nov 14 2010 12:51
blackrainbow wrote:
I think that the most important outcome of Wednesday is that the societal wide 'consensus' around the inevitability of cuts and their absolute necessity, built by all three leading bourgeois parties, has been publicly and spectacularly smashed by a section.

I'm not sure it's the consensus around the inevitability of cuts that's been smashed - IMO what's been smashed is the idea that the role of the working class is to passively endure while the ruling class fuck us over. After Wednesday we're determined to at least give them a bloody nose.

Also, I think that cuts are inevitable within a capitalist framework. In other words, a genuine will to 'stop the cuts' implies accepting the possibility of organising society in a non-capitalist way. Of course leftists are bleating about 'stop the cuts' and then propose social-democratic solutions.

gypsy
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Nov 14 2010 13:09
no1 wrote:
I think almost everyone (politicos and non-politicos) will agree that breaking a few windows and trashing a place is not a tactic capable of 'stopping the cuts'. Yet a lot of the same people are quite excited about the 10/11/10 mini-riot, because it was a very effective way of breaking with the protest politics of the past few years and of upping the ante.
.

I agree but don't you think the only reason that the Mini riot was a success was because the old bill were caught off guard and if something similar happens again that they will go in really hard and over the top?

Mike Harman
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Nov 14 2010 13:19

I think that's extremely likely, a cop was quoted in one of the newspapers saying exactly that in fact - that they've been on tenterhooks/leashes since the G20 but after the Millbank trashing no-one will be able to say anything.

However this mainly applies to demonstrations in central London, and despite people being pleasantly surprised by Thursday I don't think the past ten years of moving away from street protests are going to be reversed. At least those on here, and it looks like some of the new anti cuts groups as well whose background I'm not really clear on at the moment, are going to continue to argue for occupations and other activity closer to people's own situations rather than trying to organise London or regional marches one after the other (which was the primary tactic for the anti-war protests, and all direct action that I remember from around then ended with kettling).

The poilicing of an actual university occupation, picket lines etc. - while it could still be riot police going in heavy, the police don't have half as much experience dealing with that (those that do would be in their 40s or 50s).

everywherefrombelow
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Nov 14 2010 17:11

Forwarded from Graham Johnson investigative journalist who previously wrote a book on gang cultures in UK :

"The Observer published a watered down version of the militarised police story today - they bottled it on a full blown expose of the police - they are so lightweight. But feel free to knock it around. I working on a short doco for the BBC about it. Article is about the prospect of riots on estates and how the police are secretly militarising up to counter:"

By Graham Johnson

THIRTY years on businessman Stephen French is standing at the exact spot where he started the Toxteth riots.

Back in the recession-hit 80s, he was angry at government cuts that had led to massive deprivation.

The crisis had been made worse by heavy-handed policing.

Today the 52-year-old community leader is predicting that Britain will go up in flames again - for exactly the same reasons.

However, this time he warns there will be a serious difference.

Instead of bricks and petrol bombs, today's rioters will be armed with automatic weapons, handguns and IEDs.

'It's like history repeating itself,' says French, who escaped the grinding poverty of riot-torm Liverpool 8 to become a successful entrepreneur.

'Except now the angry young men are either armed or have access to guns.

'That's a trickie situation on both sides of the barricades.

'Even jobless brickies know how to get hold of a gun these days, because simply put, they are out there in

large numbers.

'Gang culture is deep rooted on these estates - and the unemployed are swelling their ranks.

'What's different is that people today are not afraid to use serious violence, especially against a system
they blame for obliterating their future.'

French, who has ploughed some of his fortune into projects to help teenagers in poor areas, is not alone in his apocalyptic vision.

It is shared by politcians, experts and even police officers.

Last month the widow of Pc Keith Blakelock, who was hacked to death 25 years ago during the Broadwater Farm riots, made a fresh appeal for information.

A special investigation can reveal that some cuts are threatening to plunge Britain's poorest areas into riots.

Tensions are rising between police and unemployed youths on a scale not seen since the disturbances in Toxteth, Brixton and Handsworth.

The police are also gearing up for the threat.

In London, the Metropolitan Police have bought 13 armoured personnel carriers, Jankel Guardian models, weighing six tonnes each and equipped with sniper platforms and 'reactive intervention systems.'

Merseyside Police have acquired an unmanned surveillance drone and two army-style Snatch Land Rovers - called Ballistically Protected Vehicles - like those used in Northern Ireland and Iraq.

Kent Police are leading a consortium of law enforcement agencies to buy military-standard aerial drones built by BAE and used in Afghanistan.

New police paramilitary squads, armed with German Heckler & Koch G36 machine guns with a range of half a mile and capable of firing 750 rounds a minute, have also been formed.

An announcement last week revealed that the SAS-trained units will be based at Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham and London.

The squads will be under the control of Police Chief Constables except if there is a major incident in which case a senior officer from Scotland Yard will take charge.

Police officers have also been photographed wearing civilian clothes with a blue cap marked “Police”, carrying a specially modified Heckler & Koch G3K rifle with a shortened barrel and a butt from a PSG-1 sniper rifle fitted to it — a combination used by the SAS.

Others wearing T-shirts, jeans and trainers, have been identified carrying Heckler & Koch G36C with new target illuminators purchased as an “urgent operational requirement” for UK special forces.

Forces around the country have updated their training and now have many more armed officers and

specialist weapons, such as those carried by police hunting Raoul Moat.

But experts warn that this 'militarisation' of the police is leading to an arms race between officers and

disillusioned pockets of society.

Professor Stephen Graham, an expert in cities and society at Newcastle Univerity, said: 'Military ideas of

counter-insurgency that have been learned in Iraq and Afghanistan relate increasingly closely to domestic
policing.

'Examples include the deployment of drone systems, anti-terror surveillance and the barricading of whole
city centres for sports events and political summits.

'Armed response units are increasingly called out for relatively minor offences.

'Cities are being increasingly viewed by the authorities as threatening spaces where everyone is seen as

a target.'

In 1981 Stephen French was one of three young black men who tried to stop a pal being arrested by what

they believed were heavy-handed policemen.

The dispute sparked the Toxteth riots that raged for nine days and later French became a hero in parts of his community.

'The information coming back to me this time,' he says, 'tells me that the disturbances will be more

widespread and won't just be confined to the ghetto

'It'll be the poor white suburbs as well, because those places are already on the breadline even before the

cuts. I've spoken to the lads about it in these places.

'Places like Toxteth in the inner city have become gentrified and even Islamified, the youngsters have more money. It's still as fragile as it was back then, but it's just that there's many more tinder boxes around.

'Back in my day black people were angry with the suss laws.

'Today it's the white kids who see themselves as oppressed by the anti-terror legislation such as s44 of

Terrorism Act. Then there s60's, pre-crime laws, it goes on.

'There's a tension, a real hatred now of the police anti-gang units which is similar to what we had in out

day.

'But it's not just Toxteth, it's Croxteth.'

He is referring to the sprawling housing estates in the North End of the Liverpool. Black people jokingly

call it 'the Snow' because of its overwhelmingly white population.

In neighbouring Norris Green, which falls under the same postcode, our reporters spoke to young

unemployed people.

'It's breaking point,' said 18-year-old Liam. 'I used to work part-time work as a labourer and a roofer but

that's gone.

'I used to go to day-release at college but there's no funding.

'There's anger and it will go off. I'm not a gang member but what else is there to do? There's shootings all

the time round here now. Can you imagine what it will be like when it kicks off? There will be more

shooting.'

The youths said that tension had been building up since around 2005 but that the recession, gang-warfare

and problems with the police had accelerated the feeling of despair.

In South East London the language is similar.

'Would I shoot at the police?' asked a teenager from a notorious estate in Plumstead.

'It's not a case of 'if' but 'when.'

'The police are going to get a very hard time around here when it goes off.'

The 19-year-old isn't a gangmember. He's an unemployed car valet worker.

'It's wolf season round here. Everything is tightening up. People are stealing even small things to make

money.

'I heard a girl saying that she might not have a job in December because the SureStart

centre might be going.

'Another woman was in tears because her benefits had been stopped. They are stopping people's Job

Seekers for small things like not turning up or postponing a meeting at the job centre where as you used to

be able to phone up and reaarrange.

'That all adds up to pressure.'

His 40-year-old friend adds: 'I remember there were riots in Woolwich in the 1980s. But I've seen clips on

YouTube of the riots in LA in 1993 and I think it will be like that over here.

'There's going to be people running about with guns, mayhem, people getting hurt.'

Dr Mike Rowe, a criminologist at Northumbria University, said: 'Public disturbances in the future will look

very different from those in the 1980s.

'Footage from the riots then show police officers hiding behind dust-bin lids.

'Rapid changes in policing have led to police looking and behaving in a much more militaristric way.

'Legal powers, technology, CS gas, tazers, guns are just a few examples.

'The police have access to much more varied and more poweful weaponry these days.

'It will be very different.

'If there are shots, the police these days can do so much more than withdraw and containment.

'Before a disturbance there's much more emphasis on gathering intellingence.

'There is close monitoring of the use of weapons on estates.

'There is prememptive use of community intelligence, which is sophisticated, and social indicators to

guage whether a a community is at risk of disturbance.

'And afterwards there's much more effort in treating riot areas as crime scenes with a view to gathering

evidence for conviction.

'It's no longer seen as a no man's land.

'Firearms haven't been used in great numbers in a public disturbance on the British mainland for 150

years.

'But we do seem to have more weapons in society in general and the effect of criminal groups on urban

unrest is not yet fully known.

'That factor, combined with rioters' use of technology makes the situation much more unpredictable.

'For instance in 2005 rioters and protestors in Birmingham used mobile phones and social networks

making the disturbances much more unpredictable from the police perspective.'

Following the riots on the Broadwater Farm estate in London the police have trained to deal with a small

number of gun shots being fired during a riot.

During the Tottenham unrest in 1985 two shots, believed to be from a shogun, were discharged from a

tower block while riot police clashed in the streets down below.

Using Broadwater as a blueprint, the police developed a make-believe British town called Sandford in

which senior officers modelled their decision-making in riot situations under ACPO-guideline conditions.

However, police officers told our reporters that this training was now seen as obsolete because the

unrealistic low levels of gun threat and the huge changes in armed police protocols.

Our reporter spoke to one police firearms officer in a northern city with a high rate of gun crime.

He told how police officers feared a 'worst case scenario' of muliple gun shot attacks on a crowded

riot-torn street - at a time when the police's capability has been cut.

He said: 'There's a high probability of riots involving more shooting, more people - you only have to look at

what happens in Northern Ireland now, even if it's just a gang of kids, they bring their weapons out.

'And let me be clear on this point. We can no longer just write that off as a Northern Ireland phenomenon,

that's got more to do with gangs and hoodies than sectarian violence.

'No matter what the situation, it's the same training and tactics to deal with a firearms incident.

'We train for every eventuality.

'The threat level is extremely high in a public order situation

'We have trained to deploy witha BPV which has 360 degree armour plating. Normal armed response cars

are only armoured at the front.

'We can now use ballistic shields to enter a hostile area.

'Tactics such as mobile containment and stop.

'The likely scenario is this.

'There's a disturbance on an estate and unarmed staff are sent to deal with it.

' A 'bandit' call goes out. That's when an officer calls out 'bandit, bandit, bandit' over the radio to say that

their's been shots fired.

'Their job is to seek hard cover behind say a wall, a substantial tree or an engine block.

'It's vital then that the unarmed staff provide an outer containment area in which there is sterile area in

which we can be brought it.

'That means all rioters and public are cleared out.

'Then say, two cars per shooter are sent in. Contain and neutralise the threat.

'The problems come if the sterile area is overun. There's a high chance of being attacked and disramed.

'We're trained to watch for people coming up from behind and trying to knock you out.

'That's why we have a Tazer and a baton.

hurn
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Nov 14 2010 17:27

understand the policeman









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flaneur
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Nov 14 2010 17:43
hurn wrote:

Best post ever in the history of the internet.

gypsy
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Nov 14 2010 17:54
flaneur wrote:
hurn wrote:

Best post ever in the history of the internet.

Didn't class war make that awhile ago?

cobbler
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Nov 14 2010 22:17
Ariege wrote:
We would be better served wondering how the hell we are going to get people to consider the ideas of the libertarian left than wondering how many people get arrested on another bloody doomed march or what gear the police will have next time. It is of no more concern to me than how many people got arrested the last time it kicked off at a football match.

I do agree that we need to find ways of getting our politics over to Joe Public, and smashing windows doesn't necessarily do that.

I won't be drawn into criticising the smashing of windows though: it is a physical response to the violence being imposed by government and the ruling elite, and draws attention to it: just look at how much it's being talked about.

But... It won't help us if our politics becomes entirely bound to the idea of smashing things: it is so much more than that. We need to get that message over.

Caiman del Barrio
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Nov 14 2010 22:22
cobbler wrote:
Ariege wrote:
We would be better served wondering how the hell we are going to get people to consider the ideas of the libertarian left than wondering how many people get arrested on another bloody doomed march or what gear the police will have next time. It is of no more concern to me than how many people got arrested the last time it kicked off at a football match.

I do agree that we need to find ways of getting our politics over to Joe Public, and smashing windows doesn't necessarily do that.

I see your point, but it's done a fuck of a lot more than 100 public meetings!

cobbler
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Nov 14 2010 23:30
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
cobbler wrote:

I do agree that we need to find ways of getting our politics over to Joe Public, and smashing windows doesn't necessarily do that.

I see your point, but it's done a fuck of a lot more than 100 public meetings!

It has, and such acts have their place. But at the same time, most people don't want to envisage a society ravaged by violence: so we must also make sure that anarchism is not perceived as being synonymous with violence and destruction.

We must also make sure that we successfully get across the message of what we stand for in terms of a new society, and new social relations.

gypsy
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Nov 15 2010 09:16
cobbler wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
cobbler wrote:

I do agree that we need to find ways of getting our politics over to Joe Public, and smashing windows doesn't necessarily do that.

I see your point, but it's done a fuck of a lot more than 100 public meetings!

We must also make sure that we successfully get across the message of what we stand for in terms of a new society, and new social relations.

This is very important.

winjer
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Nov 15 2010 11:35
everywherefrombelow wrote:
In London, the Metropolitan Police have bought 13 armoured personnel carriers, Jankel Guardian models, weighing six tonnes each and equipped with sniper platforms and 'reactive intervention systems.'

Bought in 2005, deployed at the G20,

"reactive intervention systems" = ladders.

Quote:
New police paramilitary squads, armed with German Heckler & Koch G36 machine guns with a range of half a mile and capable of firing 750 rounds a minute, have also been formed.

An assault rifle, having a fire rate of 750/minute, but only a 30 round magazine.

Quote:
An announcement last week revealed that the SAS-trained units will be based at Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham and London. The squads will be under the control of Police Chief Constables except if there is a major incident in which case a senior officer from Scotland Yard will take charge.

Actually, this is just about the security arrangements for the Olympics, and how existing armed units will be moved around, there are no new (or newly retrained) officers involved.

Quote:
Police officers have also been photographed wearing civilian clothes with a blue cap marked “Police”, carrying a specially modified Heckler & Koch G3K rifle with a shortened barrel and a butt from a PSG-1 sniper rifle fitted to it — a combination used by the SAS. Others wearing T-shirts, jeans and trainers, have been identified carrying Heckler & Koch G36C with new target illuminators purchased as an “urgent operational requirement” for UK special forces.

Again, this is from 2005, practically a direct quote from The Times:

The man, wearing civilian clothes with a blue cap marked “Police”, was carrying a specially modified Heckler & Koch G3K rifle with a shortened barrel and a butt from a PSG-1 sniper rifle fitted to it — a combination used by the SAS.

Another man, dressed in a T-shirt, jeans and trainers, was carrying a Heckler & Koch G36C. Although this weapon is used on occasion by SO19 it appears to be fitted with a target illuminator purchased as an “urgent operational requirement” for UK special forces involved in the war on terror.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article550024.ece

Quote:
Using Broadwater as a blueprint, the police developed a make-believe British town called Sandford in
which senior officers modelled their decision-making in riot situations under ACPO-guideline conditions.

It didn't use Broadwater as a blueprint, as it was used for training from 1983.

Quote:
However, police officers told our reporters that this training was now seen as obsolete because the unrealistic low levels of gun threat and the huge changes in armed police protocols.

I'm not surprised they see it as obsolete, as it was retired in 1990.

Graham Johnson needs to do more investigating and less frothing.

winjer
Offline
Joined: 4-05-04
Nov 15 2010 11:34
jef costello wrote:
I'd imagine this is the police trying to defend their budgets, makes you wonder about how unhappy they were to be caught off guard at the anti-education cuts demo.

Even clearer in the Telegraph:

Supt Steve Pearl was told to retire as his unit – which investigates violent political activists across Britain – began making multi-million-pound savings as part of government cutbacks in the police.
The unit’s commander, The National Coordinator for Domestic Extremism also retired and has been replaced by his more junior – and less well paid – deputy.
Supt Pearl told The Sunday Telegraph that his departure and that of other senior staff “can’t fail to have had an impact” on the police intelligence gathering operation against extremists.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/8131131/Did-police-cutbacks-allow-extremists-to-hijack-student-demonstrations.html

Written by former Mailite Jason Lewis who previously exclusively exposed the setting-up of the totally secret Confidential Intelligence Unit, a mere ten years after the police press release about it.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1138755/Secret-police-unit-set-spy-British-domestic-extremists.html

Quote:
The armored vehincles thing maks it a touch unreal, no one could be stupid enough to imagine that those could be justified in any way.

And yet:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTvkl3OKg6o

gypsy
Offline
Joined: 20-09-09
Nov 15 2010 11:46
winjer wrote:
jef costello wrote:
I'd imagine this is the police trying to defend their budgets, makes you wonder about how unhappy they were to be caught off guard at the anti-education cuts demo.

Even clearer in the Telegraph:

Supt Steve Pearl was told to retire as his unit – which investigates violent political activists across Britain – began making multi-million-pound savings as part of government cutbacks in the police.
The unit’s commander, The National Coordinator for Domestic Extremism also retired and has been replaced by his more junior – and less well paid – deputy.
Supt Pearl told The Sunday Telegraph that his departure and that of other senior staff “can’t fail to have had an impact” on the police intelligence gathering operation against extremists.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/8131131/Did-police-cutbacks-allow-extremists-to-hijack-student-demonstrations.html

Written by former Mailite Jason Lewis who previously exclusively exposed the setting-up of the totally secret Confidential Intelligence Unit, a mere ten years after the police press release about it.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1138755/Secret-police-unit-set-spy-British-domestic-extremists.html

Quote:
The armored vehincles thing maks it a touch unreal, no one could be stupid enough to imagine that those could be justified in any way.

And yet:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTvkl3OKg6o

Interesting stuff.

Awesome Dude's picture
Awesome Dude
Offline
Joined: 31-07-07
Nov 15 2010 13:26

Fancy a new job?

Look out for the job description for the head of the CIU:

Quote:
Successful applicants will be tasked with "manag[ing] the covert intelligence function for domestic extremism, and the confidential intelligence unit" and "Develop[ing] the business of the confidential intelligence unit to support NCDE [National Covert Domestic Extremist] units and the wider DE policing objectives."
gypsy
Offline
Joined: 20-09-09
Nov 15 2010 14:40
blackrainbow wrote:
Fancy a new job?

Look out for the job description for the head of the CIU:

Quote:
Successful applicants will be tasked with "manag[ing] the covert intelligence function for domestic extremism, and the confidential intelligence unit" and "Develop[ing] the business of the confidential intelligence unit to support NCDE [National Covert Domestic Extremist] units and the wider DE policing objectives."

haha nice find. Was gonna apply but I don't meet the person specification wink

cobbler
Offline
Joined: 22-12-09
Nov 15 2010 20:12

LOL. Still banging on about the event being hijacked by anarchists.