Suggestions for living in Sussex / UK?

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Chris Bovington
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Jun 19 2011 22:35
Suggestions for living in Sussex / UK?

Hey Y'all,

Can anyone from Sussex give me some pointers on what's available?

I now live in Burgess Hill, near Brighton. I don't have my own means of transportation. I'ld like to learn how to manage here with as little interaction with the authorities as possible. I'm wondering how you exchange goods here - especially food, clothing, tools, materials, and other necessities.

Also, if anyone has any suggestions for the same in the UK generally, I'ld love to hear them.

Is anyone producing stuff for the radical communty? I'm looking for the basic stuff that makes the world go round.

Cheers.

gypsy
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Sep 30 2009 17:41

...removed my post as was abit silly in hindsight. Actually what I said was chickens. As you can easily sell the eggs to passers by etc and get paid for that free range shit.

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Steven.
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Sep 30 2009 17:38

Hello Chris.

In Sussex and the UK goods and services are mostly exchanged by the medium of money.

For the working class, money is obtained by selling our ability to work for a wage. With these wages we can then purchase goods and services, including food, clothing and tools.

You will find outlets providing these goods on your local high street, or alternatively use Amazon or eBay on the Internet.

Radicals as well as conservatives are permitted, even encouraged, to make use of these.

Best of luck!

Chris Bovington
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Sep 30 2009 17:55

Very facetious, Steven, and absolutely no help.

What unconventional, grey-market solutions do people have? And I don't mean hypotheticals. I mean specific practical answers.

Chris Bovington
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Sep 30 2009 17:58

Allybaba,

I don't have anywhere to keep chickens, or to grow food. But I would like to hear of locals who do produce a surplus and who are inclined to make arrangements.

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Steven.
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Sep 30 2009 18:06

Sorry if you felt my post was unhelpful. However, this is an anarchist website, and so is unrelated to where you purchase goods.

You also posted this in the "organise" forum, which was not an appropriate location seeing as this topic is not about workers organisation but about your shopping habits, which are of minimal interest to any revolutionary project I'm afraid.

morven
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Sep 30 2009 18:25

This isn't CrimethInc! Or the Multi Coloured Swap Shop!

As a conventional grey minded worker I think Steven's suggestions are spot on.

Anyway, good look finding a viable alternative.

For communism (not 'radical' communities), Morven

gypsy
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Sep 30 2009 18:34

I don't know Chris. Most of the people here don't really know about what your asking. Im sure you will be able to find a few like minded people to exchange goods with. But you are gonna have to have something to exchange I guess. Plus nowadays you are gonna have to cross the authorities im afraid unless you move to the wilds of say the highlands which at this time of the year is starting to get fucking cold.

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Joseph Kay
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Sep 30 2009 18:58

Chris, to be honest while Steven's being a bit facetious, basically if you want stuff you need money. I don't know if any of the various 'alternative' trading schemes exist, but if they do asking around the Cowley Club in London Road, Brighton is your best bet.

Yorkie Bar
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Sep 30 2009 21:04
Steven. wrote:
Hello Chris.

In Sussex and the UK goods and services are mostly exchanged by the medium of money.

For the working class, money is obtained by selling our ability to work for a wage. With these wages we can then purchase goods and services, including food, clothing and tools.

You will find outlets providing these goods on your local high street, or alternatively use Amazon or eBay on the Internet.

Radicals as well as conservatives are permitted, even encouraged, to make use of these.

Best of luck!

fuckin' lol

~J.

B_Reasonable
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Joined: 6-02-09
Sep 30 2009 22:12

@Chris You might also try asking around Forest Row. This is a village about 15 miles north of Burgess Hill on the A22 just before East Grinstead. There is a large Steiner community there and they are often into growing their own stuff, and arts & crafts.

Chris Bovington
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Jun 19 2011 22:34

*

Chris Bovington
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Oct 2 2009 18:14

Steven, if you didn't intend your first post to be facetious, my mistake. Since I'm on this website mainly because I accept the basic assumptions of the ideologies and find value in them, it seemed to be a bit of an obvious response so I figured you were joking. But it seems I misread you, so thanks for volunteering an answer.

For those of you who clearly think I'm asking the wrong questions, start a new topic and tell me how you try to live by your ideals in a practical sense. I'd be very interested to read about that. Just be sure to point the topic thread out to me with a message, 'cause I don't spend much time trawling through the discussion board. If you already have a favorite thread that talks about this subject, please point that out to me instead. The more concise, the better. Thanks.

Chris Bovington
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Oct 2 2009 18:23

Morven,

Radical = In a political sense, anything strikingly different from (and often opposed to) the status quo. A general term that includes Anarchism and Communism (among other positions) when the status quo is corporatist, quasi-capitalist statism. I used it as a short-hand term.

Also, are Crimethinc and Multi Coloured Swap Shop genuine suggestions? I've not heard of them, so I have no field of reference.

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Joseph Kay
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Oct 2 2009 18:49

http://www.freecycle.org/group/United%20Kingdom/South%20East/Brighton

Chris Bovington
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Oct 2 2009 18:56

Thanks Joseph. That's a great website.

gypsy
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Joined: 20-09-09
Oct 2 2009 21:35
Chris Bovington wrote:
Morven,

Radical = In a political sense, anything strikingly different from (and often opposed to) the status quo. A general term that includes Anarchism and Communism (among other positions) when the status quo is corporatist, quasi-capitalist statism. I used it as a short-hand term.

Also, are Crimethinc and Multi Coloured Swap Shop genuine suggestions? I've not heard of them, so I have no field of reference.

I think crimethinc is american? Never heard of the other one.

Chris Bovington
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Oct 3 2009 11:56

This is what Wikipedia had to say about the Multi Coloured Swap Shop:

"Multi-Coloured Swap Shop, more commonly known simply as Swap Shop, was a UK children's television programme. It was broadcast on Saturday mornings on BBC1 for 146 episodes in six series between 1976 and 1982. It was ground-breaking in many ways: by being live, sometimes up to three hours in length, and using the phone-in format extensively for the first time on TV."

"...The cornerstone, however, was the Swaporama element, hosted by Chegwin, who was very rarely in the studio. An outside broadcast unit would travel to different locations throughout the country where children could swap their belongings with others. This proved to be one of the most popular aspects of the show, often achieving gatherings of more than 2,000 children."

Frickin' hilarious.

The site also describes CrimethInc as "a decentralized anarchist collective composed of autonomous cells."

That was actually helpful.

gypsy
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Oct 4 2009 09:09

Chegwin is pretty legendary.

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spitzenprodukte
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Oct 4 2009 18:15
Chris Bovington wrote:
This is what Wikipedia had to say about the Multi Coloured Swap Shop:

"Multi-Coloured Swap Shop, more commonly known simply as Swap Shop, was a UK children's television programme. It was broadcast on Saturday mornings on BBC1 for 146 episodes in six series between 1976 and 1982. It was ground-breaking in many ways: by being live, sometimes up to three hours in length, and using the phone-in format extensively for the first time on TV."

"...The cornerstone, however, was the Swaporama element, hosted by Chegwin, who was very rarely in the studio. An outside broadcast unit would travel to different locations throughout the country where children could swap their belongings with others. This proved to be one of the most popular aspects of the show, often achieving gatherings of more than 2,000 children."

Frickin' hilarious.

I've never seen Cheggers and Proudhon in the same room-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klXUOM4wtT8