Zapatistas - split from queer theory

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aketus
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Joined: 16-02-06
May 3 2006 05:02

I agree, the municipalities are where the future is for zapatistas, they are libertarian, and are largely a success. The army, I do hope like you say, winds down, because I don't think a hierarchial army is libertarian at all, and cannot be the engine of revolution, achieving as a minority, something for a majority. That's like saying the transitional state of the prol's dictatorship is libertarian and necessary for achieving the success of a revolution. No it isn't. Nor is the EZLN army. Not by any means.

So as far as I'm concerned, we don't need Marcos bouncing around the country being the forerunner of change as delegate of the EZLN. The people themselves need to organise and create more autonomous municipalities like the existing ones, and have real organised communities spread, not spokesmen of armies.

coyote
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May 3 2006 13:16

Incidentally marcos now calls himself "delegate zero" in attempt to rid himself of the leader cult discussed above.

My understanding is that the EZLN takes its orders from the council of community assemblies in the autonomous zones (i forget the exact terminology) - and that therefore the army receives its orders from the municipalities and not the other way around. A very very important step forward for this region when you look at the Guatemalan guerillas of the 1980s and the disasterous decisions and attitudes they took.

the current tour (featuring marcos....) seems a very diliberately low key grassroots, small scale thing, with initiatives coming from below. Events are small, local and not big rallies by and large. They appear to have been organised by local groups, rather than centrally, the EZLN acting as a kind of coordinating energy more than anything else. Events in DF so far have followed this pattern. only one media orientated event - mayday. Which was pretty small, maybe a few 1000s at the US embassy in solidarity with migrant workers and a march of tens of thousands later. More significant are moves within the labour movement. Official unions breaking and joing autonomous coordinations and moving towards the "othercampaign".

Of coursethe EZLN are not the perfect libertarian communist organisation, but they represent two extremely important events:

1) a move a away from trad guevarist guerillaism towards a military strategy based upon the needs of insurgent communities

2) the building of political movement that is autonomous and "from below"

We should surely be supporting this.

coyote
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May 3 2006 13:21
aketus wrote:
So as far as I'm concerned, we don't need Marcos bouncing around the country being the forerunner of change as delegate of the EZLN. The people themselves need to organise and create more autonomous municipalities like the existing ones, and have real organised communities spread, not spokesmen of armies.

This has happenned, and is continuing to happen. there are many struggles for/of autonomous communities across Mexico. you just haven´t heard of them!

Sometimes because they get no media coverage

Sometimes because they have no links with other struggles

Sometimes because they are crushed by the Mexican state

The other campaign was formed, in part, to prevent this happenning and to support these struggles, to encourage links between indigenous, labour and other struggles. "Marcos bouncing around" like it or not is aimed at doing just this.

Catch 22
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May 3 2006 20:45
Quote:
My understanding is that the EZLN takes its orders from the council of community assemblies in the autonomous zones (i forget the exact terminology) - and that therefore the army receives its orders from the municipalities and not the other way around. A very very important step forward for this region when you look at the Guatemalan guerillas of the 1980s and the disasterous decisions and attitudes they took.

Yes this is how I understand it. I also recall that the EZLN rank and file elects and recalls officers

Quote:
I agree, the municipalities are where the future is for zapatistas, they are libertarian, and are largely a success. The army, I do hope like you say, winds down, because I don't think a hierarchial army is libertarian at all, and cannot be the engine of revolution, achieving as a minority, something for a majority. That's like saying the transitional state of the prol's dictatorship is libertarian and necessary for achieving the success of a revolution. No it isn't. Nor is the EZLN army. Not by any means.

As coyete said, the army takes its orders from the communities and not the other way around. I agree though that an army cannot be the prime progenitor of the struggle. A guerilla army can’t achieve revolution simply by itself, only a movement with mass potential can proffer a real revolution.

However I still think we’ve got our view of the army ass backwards. The army doesn’t see itself as the vanguard of the revolution, but as the protector of the revolution. They aren’t a revolutionary army carrying out a revolutionary program, but an army of revolutionaries protecting communities in revolt. The EZLN derives its authority as the servant of the people and serves as such. At least that’s how it reads to me.

Quote:
So as far as I'm concerned, we don't need Marcos bouncing around the country being the forerunner of change as delegate of the EZLN. The people themselves need to organise and create more autonomous municipalities like the existing ones, and have real organised communities spread, not spokesmen of armies.

Marcos isn’t trying to create a cult of personality, he never has. The balaclava virtually ensures this. Marcos has also resigned his position as a subcommandatne so as to dissuade any claims of conlifct of interest. Marcos is there to listen and to foster dialogue that’s all. He takes copious notes throughout the meetings and is always the last to speak.

We need to understand that this is just the first leg of a generalized strategy of revolt. The zaps have sent out Marcos to listen because he is their “statesman” of sorts. But once the foundations are in the place this tour will change immensely. Already groups “from the below” have been using the campaign to unify and organize. Citizens in Oaxaca seized their town from a corrupt PRIsta, tenants groups in Cacun have redoubled their efforts to avoid eviction, and people of all kinds are vowing total resistance to forced eviction for the Perota Dam project.

This is just the beginning. All over the people are organizing and coordinating, working autonomously and democratically to make their lives better. Watch out cause this could get big real fast.

Oh and if anyone is in need of an “la otra campaña” fix try

http://www.narconews.com/otroperiodismo/en.html

lots of great stuff covering every leg of the journey. My favorite story is about an indigenous community that organized a community police to kick out bandits.

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aketus
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May 4 2006 05:31

Anyhow, news just in, thought some of you may be interested..

Quote:
Notimex

19:30 Subcomandante Marcos announced today that he has declared a Red

Alert in the Autonomous Municipalities of Chiapas (MAREZ) due to the

conflict between peasants and State forces in the State of Mexico, in the center of the country [Salvador Atenco to be exact]

‘We are declaring ourselves on Red Alert’ said Marcos during a public

event in the Plaza of Three Cultures, in Mexico City and he said that,

‘from this moment on an alternative command structure is in place in case anything were to happen to me.’

The Zapatista Leader declared this after learning of clashes today between the community of Salvador Atenco and police, clashes that have left 42 people injured, at least three of them critically [as of 20:45 Reforma newspaper had posted that two had in fact died as a result of the attacks]

The Zapatista army of National Liberation, who has received numerous

signs of support from the population of San Salvador de Atenco, has for a number of years controlled a series of autonomous municipalities [whose centers] they refer to as Caracoles.

Marcos declared, ‘We are Atencos,’ with reference to the population of

Salvador de Atenco which has for the last several years mounted a number of campaigns of resistance [most specifically against a government sponsored airport]

‘From this moment on we are canceling all our scheduled events and we will instead dedicate ourselves, to the extent it is needed, to meeting the needs of the people of Atenco,’ said Marcos, whom after his speech ducked into an apartment in the Tlatelolco area in the northern part of Mexico City.