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Malcolm X, Smethwick, and the influence of the African American freedom struggle on British race relations in the 1960s

An essay by Joe Street detailing Macolm X's trip to Smethwick, Birmingham in the 1960s and its impact.

Obi B. Egbuna, C. L. R. James and the birth of black power in Britain: Black radicalism in Britain 1967–72

R.E.R. Bunce's essay on the political direction black British radicalism took in the late 1960s. This transformation followed the visit of Stokely Carmichael whom the Labour Party deported.

“Britain is no longer white”: James Baldwin as a witness to Postcolonial Britain

An essay by Rob Waters on James Baldwin's time in and reflections on Britain.

50 Years of Equal Exploitation?

29 May marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Equal Pay Act 1970, precipitated by the Ford sewing machinists’ strike in 1968 which started in Dagenham.

New UK initiative - Founding conference

Stuff the DWP (don't want us to know)

New pamphlet published by Liverpool SolFed by benefits claimants, for claimants: Stuff the DWP! (doesn't want us to know).

Covering our most important rights in clear, simple language, while also pulling no punches on the need for direct action and a movement to change the system.

Direct Action: Paper of the Syndicalist Workers' Federation (1960s)

A partial archive of Direct Action, a paper produced by the Syndicalist Workers' Federation. Taken from the excellent collection at the Sparrow's Nest.

Senex's Letters on Associated Labour

The oldest complete work of socialist economic theory

State Control is not Socialism

According to Tom Harris in The Daily Telegraph on 17 March, “we are all socialists now”.

"All in this Together"? A Sick Joke

The myth that we’re all in this together is already wearing thin. COVID-19 has come after ten years of grinding austerity characterised by the gig economy, poverty wages, benefit cuts, attacks on the NHS, and a desperate housing crisis. While the richest 1% have got richer, we’ve had a growth in food banks, child poverty, unaffordable housing and poor health. In fact UK poverty numbers were at their highest level for 18 years even before the coronavirus. Unequal societies are prone to outbreaks of mass disease, and our society gets more unequal with every passing day. Lockdown has shown that this is a public health crisis defined by inequality, and the working class is suffering most.