UK

Reflekshuns from K

Some reflections on the media outrage about Mayday 2000 which includes a useful overview of international activity on the day.

Class Struggle and Gender Trouble

Leaflet distributed by the CWO at protests around the Gender Recognition Act (GRA) happening around the UK last year.

Domestic Violence is a Workplace Issue

The combination of poor working conditions and sexism in our workplaces makes it harder for victims and survivors of abuse to access the resources and support they need. If we want to create workplace solidarity we need to be aware of the fact that our colleagues may be experiencing violence at home.

Dope springs eternal from May Day riot - Nicholas Watt

An amusing press cutting about the aftermath of the guerrilla gardening in Parliament Square during Mayday 2000.

Reflections on Mayday 2000

A collection of texts reflecting on Mayday 2000: A festival of anti-capitalist ideas and action in London.

PDFs courtesy of the comrades at Sparrows Nest Archive, Nottingham.

Organising 101 - Dave Smith

A series of workplace organising tips, with a particular focus on health and safety, by Dave Smith of the Blacklist Support Group. This series was first published by Hazards Magazine.

Death Notice: Phil Windsor R.I.P

Death notice for a revolutionary hero.

Kill the Bill? Change the System!

Leaflet distributed by the CWO at various Kill the Bill protests happening around the UK.

A Plague on Both Your Houses – The Position of the Working Class in the Current Crisis

This pamphlet is product of our collective debate and conversations with fellow workers over recent months. You can read a summary of over a dozen interviews about changing power-relations during the lockdown here. Feel free to print this text as a pamphlet and share it with your comrades and co-workers.

UK Asylum Policy: No Sanctuary from Capitalism

Asylum has long been a thorny issue for the British ruling class. As a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention the UK is obliged to grant asylum when, in the opinion of the Home Office, an asylum seeker has demonstrated that they have a well founded fear of persecution on the grounds of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group. Yet asylum seekers are continuously vilified in the popular press as criminals and scroungers overwhelming the benefits system, the vitriol often being fuelled by the cynical statements of government ministers.