theory of value

[VIDEO] Tax the Rich? New questions

https://youtu.be/5q6j4Kh8LEA

• Is it justified that high-salary workers pay a high portion of the tax revenue? If so, what is that justification?

• Does paying a high portion of taxes mean they contribute more to society than other workers?

• Does the high market value of their labor, as reflected by their high salary, mean their labor contributes more social value to society?

• Higher tax for the rich is the progressive liberal solution to address inequality and provide better funding for public goods and services. But what is the socialist solution? (Note that I use the word socialist to refer to a stateless and classless society.)

[VIDEO] Tax the Rich? Why More Is Not Enough

A critique of both the conservative and liberal perspectives on taxing the rich.
Link: https://youtu.be/SJaoDBJC8M0

PragerU and The Daily Wire misrepresent the facts to exaggerate how much tax the rich pay. However, a large portion of tax revenue is indeed paid by the rich. The argument that liberal progressives make to justify this is: Those who can afford more should pay more. But this accepts the belief that the rich subsidize and support the rest of us.

The opposite is true, at least when it comes to rich capitalists, i.e. the majority of the rich. It’s the working-class who support and subsidize the rich by producing their wealth.

The Disappointed of 1968: Seeking Refuge in Utopia

The communisers do not have a strategy for exiting capitalist society. The real and difficult problems of class consciousness, political organisation, bourgeois power and a period of transition are simply brushed aside as non-problems. What this represents is disillusionment and a cry of despair.

Some Clarifications on Roberts' Idea of the Falling Rate of Profit

Roberts (in tandem with the likes of Carchedi and Maito) frequently makes decent critiques of the existing trends in the capitalist crisis. However, despite criticising others on the capitalist left for their neo-Keynesianism, he offers little more than the suggestion that nationalisation would solve capital’s problems. The brief article here reveals a fairly fundamental error. (CWO)

Review of Money and Totality by Fred Moseley

Today, as the global economy flounders from crisis to crisis, Marx’s analysis of capitalism is the essential basis for a correct understanding of what is going on. Moseley’s book reaffirms key elements of this analysis. The previous obsession with the transformation problem has resulted in the undermining of these key aspects of Marx’s critique, actually making an understanding of twenty first century capitalism harder. Moseley’s book, though long winded and somewhat repetitive, serves a very useful purpose in exposing this undermining and its implications. For this reason alone it is worth reading.

On transition - humanaesfera

On the transition to a new society through the universally interconnected conditions of existence produced by capitalist society. (Reply to "Notes on the transition to communism," from the collective Kontraklasa, Croatia).

Tegen arbeid, tegen kapitaal - een interview met Robert Kurz

Robert Kurz

“Een kritiek op het kapitalisme vanuit het standpunt van de arbeid is een logische onmogelijkheid, omdat je het kapitalisme niet vanuit het oogpunt van zijn eigen substantie kan bekritiseren.”

In dit interview uit 2010 praat journalist/filosoof Robert Kurz over de vragen die hij in zijn werk stelt: de dynamiek van economische crisis, hoe het kapitalisme in de loop van de geschiedenis zijn eigen substantie steeds verder uitholt en de crisistheorie van Marx. Hij schetst wat de actuele inhoud zou zijn van een ecologisch houdbare maatschappij op basis van “bewuste maatschappelijke planning”, in tegenstelling tot de “planning van de waarde” die in het Oostblok als socialisme gold.

Are we now in a period of transition from capitalism to socialism? H. Ticktin’s concept of decline and transition

Capitalism must be overthrown before a transitional period can be initiated. There must be a total rupture with value production. In order for this to happen the working class must capture political power and set about consciously transforming social production relations. Ticktin’s conceptions seem like those other aficionados of a seamless transition to communism, who have long lost hope in the working class being the agent of revolution.