Egyptian uprising - updates and discussion

Egyptian uprising - updates and discussion

Live updates and discussion from the Egyptian uprising which began on 25 January 2011.

From the Egyptian Chronicles blog...

http://egyptianchronicles.blogspot.com/2011/01/jan25-is-getting-serious.html

Quote:
The January 25th protest is getting serious attention more and more. More Facebook pages and groups are calling for the #25 Jan and more political groups are going to participate in the huge event "They are about 17 groups".Many are praying that it be the start of a new thing in Egypt. Now if you are interested in following the protest on twitter to know its updates then follow this hash tag (#Jan25)

Surprisingly “Salafist movement for reform” aka “HAFS” has announced that it will participate in the event , this is the first time a Salafist movement participates in something like this considering the Salafist believes and teachings. I have my fear and my suspicion which I will keep it to myself. I know that this particular movement  has its political believes still ....

The Mahalla workers will participate too , you may remember how they made their own day on the 6th April from couple of years ago.

Another huge surprise or even change in this protest is its location in Cairo and Giza, it is no longer Down town or Nile corniche but rather at the famous Gamaat Al Doul street in Mohendessin , the heart of the middle class in Giza !! The other places are : Cairo university in Giza , Dawaran Shubra and Dawaran Al Mataria in Cairo.

The NDP will participate too , of course in pro-regime protests of love …etc. May be this will be a showdown between the regime and the opposition , the real opposition in Egypt on who has got the word in the street. There are rumors that the MOI will launch its thugs to create chaos and violence , all what I know for sure is  that the police will not enjoy their holiday because they will have to work.  Personally I think the regime will let that day pass peacefully in order not to push the people in to another degree of anger , the world is now watching the Arab countries post-Tunisian revolution in an anticipation.

The Egyptians in London are going to protest next Sunday January 23, 2011 at 1 PM in front of the Egyptian embassy in London , if you are there and interested in joining them then here is the Egyptian embassy address : 26 South Street, Westminster, London W1K 1DW. There will be also insh Allah a protest in Bologna , Italy. It will be held on the 23rd of January at 12 PM at Piazza del Nettuno. Also on Sunday there will be a protest held at 1 PM  in front of the Egyptian mission to the UN HQ in New York at at 304 East 44th Street.  Now it will not be the last capital in the world that will witness a protest in front of the Egyptian embassy or mission on that coming Sunday because there will be a protest in our embassy in Madrid at 1 PM too.

Our  great Tunisian brothers are going to protest in solidarity with the Egyptian people in front of the Egyptian embassy next January 25, 2011. Also our dear Jordanian brothers are going to protest inn front of the Egyptian embassy next January 25 ,2011. Our brothers in Yemen sent a solidarity email to the admin of “We are all Khaled Said” page.

Just like El General in Tunisia the Egyptian rap singers and bands are making songs for the #Jan25 just  like this one by rapper Ahmed Rock.There are lots of video clips on YouTube made by activists to encourage the people to participate in the protest of #Jan25.

Posted By

Mark.
Jan 23 2011 13:13

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Soapy
Jan 29 2011 22:19

AJE is reporting that armed protesters tried and failed to storm the interior ministry leading to the deaths of several protesters

Stranger Than P...
Jan 29 2011 22:47
Quote:
ElShayyal said that 1,700 public workers in Suez had gone on an indefinite strike seeking Mubarak's resignation.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/2011129155142145826.html

Mark.
Jan 29 2011 22:49

According to a comment posted on the Arabist blog

Quote:
-There are no more police anywhere, and the few security officers I saw, seemed to have deserted and joined local watch groups.

-Looting seems to have slowed as people throughout Cairo have organized and there are bands of neighborhood watch everywhere

-The prison break is also what has made many scared

-And there is still fighting and gunfire at the interior ministry

And on the EA liveblog

Quote:
2130 GMT: Reports of clashes in 6 October suburb of Cairo between resident and "30 thugs in police cars trying to break into the area".
petey
Jan 30 2011 00:18

MSM notes:
- CBS led with a surprisingly good piece focusing on poverty, unemployment, and political alienation as the drivers; they referred to looting without fetishizing it, though local news went with that angle (it bled so it led)
- NBC had sec'y cohen on again, who again couldn't say enough good about mubarak

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 00:40

On the EA liveblog

Quote:
2247 GMT: A German news agency is claiming 19 private planes have departed Cairo Airport carrying Egyptian and Arab businessmen and families.

2245 GMT: Tens of thousands of protesters are still in central Cairo, with food being organised for them.

2240 GMT: A senior police officer has been kidnapped in Damietta, 200kilometres/120miles north of Cairo. Tarek Hammad is Head of Damietta Security.

2230 GMT: Escalating story tonight of at least one sniper in the Ministry of Interior picking off protesters outside the building. Witnesses are saying 10 to 15 people have been shot dead and dozens have been wounded. Dr Muhammad Hassan tells Al Jazeera that dead protestors from the area are flooding the makeshift field hospital.

2225 GMT: Al Jazeera reports the death of Major General Mohammed El-Batran, head of the Investigative Unit at Fayoum Central Jail in middle Egypt, 130 kilometres (80 miles) southwest of Cairo. About 700 prisoners have fled.

Photos from Saturday

Hieronymous
Jan 30 2011 17:18


An army tank is parked near a burnt-out armoured personnel carrier in Tahrir square
(from the Guardian 29 January 2010)

This is amazing!

ludd
Jan 30 2011 03:56

Youth Journalism International: Inside The Egyptian Revolution

Quote:
Inside The Egyptian Revolution
Here is a firsthand account of the Egyptian revolution from Youth Journalism International senior reporter Jessica Elsayed, a 17-year-old student in Alexandria, Egypt:

...

The timing is perfect. Exams are over and schools and colleges are closed now for a mid-year vacation, which is one reason the crowds got so big on Friday.
Nobody cares that the ruling party headquarters went up in flames yesterday. Its furnishings were stolen from the people.
Other buildings that burned also don’t matter.
All of this can be fixed. Burned buildings can be fixed.
Being oppressed cannot be fixed except through revolt. Mubarak left us no other choice.
We’re optimistic. Everyone’s optimistic. We’re going to be OK.
It’s a different country than it was just five days ago.

...

Spartacus
Jan 30 2011 05:43
ludd wrote:
Youth Journalism International: Inside The Egyptian Revolution
Quote:
Inside The Egyptian Revolution
Here is a firsthand account of the Egyptian revolution from Youth Journalism International senior reporter Jessica Elsayed, a 17-year-old student in Alexandria, Egypt:

...

The timing is perfect. Exams are over and schools and colleges are closed now for a mid-year vacation, which is one reason the crowds got so big on Friday.
Nobody cares that the ruling party headquarters went up in flames yesterday. Its furnishings were stolen from the people.
Other buildings that burned also don’t matter.
All of this can be fixed. Burned buildings can be fixed.
Being oppressed cannot be fixed except through revolt. Mubarak left us no other choice.
We’re optimistic. Everyone’s optimistic. We’re going to be OK.
It’s a different country than it was just five days ago.

...

for a moment there i thought she was going to say "we carry a new world here in our hearts"!

since friday is long passed i suppose the danger from spreading that protest guide mentioned earlier is also gone, here's a translation of some of the pages.

Samotnaf
Jan 30 2011 06:59
Quote:
It’s a different country than it was just five days ago.

Reminds me of the May '68 graffiti: Ten days of happiness already. Hard to keep up with it all.

I know the Muslim Brotherhood have been hardly present during this movement, and most people are saying that this is because they don't know what to do. But maybe they're also playing a more long-term strategy; if the liberal democrats round ElBaradei get into power and dampen down the movement (concentrating on political reforms rather than social reforms related to survival) they could recuperate the very likely resurgence of social contestation into Islamic fundamentalist perspectives. Sure this is jumping the gun and is pretty much off the top of my head as my knowledge of Egypt is very very limited, but maybe it's worth considering, no?

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 13:23

Some extracts from the EA liveblog

Quote:
1305 GMT: Al Jazeera now estimates more than 150,000 people are in Tahrir Square in Cairo.

1255 GMT: Apparently Reuters has banned Al Jazeera from using its footage from Egypt.

1145 GMT: And it happened. Dan Nolan just reported that Al Jazeera's Cairo Bureau was just shut down by government plain clothesmen. The TV uplink has been closed. 

1122 GMT: Al Jazeera released a new casualty count for the protests so far in the past few days: 150 killed, 4,000 injured. 

1105 GMT: Al Jazeera reports that hundreds of protestors have clashed with security forces outside the headquarters of the ruling party NDP in Assiut Province in upper Egypt south of Cairo.

1100 GMT: Al Jazeera Arabic is now off-air in Egypt.

1055 GMT: Al Arabiya says officers in Qatta Prison near Cairo have fired at prisoners and their families, killing 170 and injuring 200.

1050 GMT: A Muslim Brotherhood official says 34 members were arrested on Friday but were released by protesters from a detention facility in the 6 October section of Cairo. Leaders Mohamed Morsi and Issam El Eryan were among those freed.

1039 GMT: Confirmation that thousands of prisoners have fled from Wadi El Natrun jail north of Cairo. Eight inmates died in the breakout.

1030 GMT: Thousands have now gathered in front of Qaid Ibrahim mosque in Alexandria for the funeral procession of three protesters who have been killed.

0815 GMT: Al Jazeera is reporting that military vehicles are now on the streets of Sharm el Sheikh in the Sinai Peninsula. The terms of the 1979 Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt prohibited any military presence in the Sinai. So the move is likely to have had Israeli acceptance; West Jerusalem has refused on previous occasions to allow the entry of Egypt's military.

A German press agency has been reporting that fires erupted in Sharm el Sheikh market amidst looting & ransacking.

Al Hewar is reporting that the house belonging to the in-laws of Hosni Mubarak has been looted in Minya, 245 kilometres/152 miles south of Cairo.

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 13:18
Mark.
Jan 30 2011 13:21

Mubarak clings on as his power ebbs (al-bab.com)

Quote:
On the streets, something strange happened yesterday: the police melted away and looters moved in. There were repeated allegations that the looters were in fact plainclothes police and other members of the security apparatus whose aim was to cause mayhem and provide the excuse for a harsh crackdown. However, Egyptians responded by setting up their own neighbourhood protection committees – a move that seems to have been relatively effective. (There were similar stories of government-instigated looting during the latter stages of the Tunisian uprising.)

This morning there were reports of a stronger army presence on the streets of Cairo, especially around Tahrir Square, but it seems this may be limited to certain areas only and there are questions about whether the army is really capable of carrying out policing operations across the country.

Rumours have been circulating that the army will take a much tougher line with protesters today – what some are calling the Tiananmen Square option. However, I am sceptical about that. For one, thing, the US has warned strongly against it, and though Mubarak may not listen to Washington I think his commanders are more likely to. A couple of reports on Twitter say women are likely to be at the fore of today's protests "to give the men a rest". If so, that may also deter the military. Others point out that Suleiman and Shafik are old-style authoritarians who may stop at nothing in their efforts to salvage the situation...

squaler
Jan 30 2011 13:32

this: http://twitter.com/Jan25voices

has mohamed badee of the MB saying:

" Mubarak responsible for current events "
" We are everywhere in all classes, in all sexes, in all places, in all positions and we are helping the people of Egypt now "
" The fatalities are fourtimes the announced figures "

phone interview on al jazeera in arabic apparently, can't find it myself though

reports of dumdum bullets being used though pictures look more like buckshot

edit: found the link for this, looks pretty clearly buckshot
http://www.flickr.com/photos/58934713@N06/5400325520/in/set-72157625932819712/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/58934713@N06/5400323254/in/set-72157625932819712/

7 modern us tanks spotted on the streets of cairo

edit: from guardian live blog (audio link on site):
1.21pm: "At first we trusted the army, but we don't trust them any more," protester Mohamed Ali tells Peter Beaumont as a new tank unit moves into Tahrir Square.

edit: has anyone heard what the MFO and task force sinai specifically are doing in all this?

squaler
Jan 30 2011 13:35

http://twitter.com/3arabawy

hossam has net access somehow

read it while it's hot

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 13:48

squaler - thanks - from that twitter feed:

Quote:
The Popular Committees hold the seeds for what direct democracy could look like in the future. We need to focus on them instead of BARADIE!
squaler
Jan 30 2011 13:54

there's a whole beautiful chain of them... I wonder how much it represents popular sentiment and how much hossam wants it to, no way for me to know from here, but one can hope he is right...

IT IS NOT TRUE WHAT MSM IS BROADCASTING ABOUT PROTESTERS CALLING ON BARADIE TO LEAD TRANSITIONAL GOVT!

WE DO NOT WANT THE ARMY! THE ARMY HAS BEEN RULING SINCE 1952. THEY R NOT NEUTRAL PLAYERS.

My neighborhood Nasr City, my city Cairo and in all Egyptian towns, popular committees r being formed by citizens to provide security.

It is not true what some MSM outlets r broadcasting about the Muslim Brotherhood and the 6th of April leading the protests. It's complete BS

The Popular Committees hold the seeds for what direct democracy could look like in the future. We need to focus on them instead of BARADIE!

The protests have spontaneous leaders in most of the occasions. We won't let this upririsng to be hijacked by anybody.

Beltov
Jan 30 2011 14:01

Tahrir Square being buzzed by F16 fighter jets. Reinforcements of army trucks arriving...

Wellclose Square
Jan 30 2011 14:22

Clinton: 'There must be an orderly transition to democracy' - as opposed to the 'disorder' of 'the street'? Reinforced by bullets?

Looks very ominous and scary.

baboon
Jan 30 2011 14:43

As far as I can see, the intelligence chief Suleiman, the new Vice President, has been running Egypt for a number of years, certainly while Murbarak has been in ill-health. He's ranked by many as a more powerful in the region than the boss of Mossad. He's very much respected by the ruling classes of Israel, the US, Britain and the EU and like these gangsters has been a potent force in creating the Palestinian Authority as an arm of Isreali repression. According to the recent al-Jazeera leaks MI6, produced a security plan for the PA, working with Egyptian intelligence out of the British embassy in Egypt.

It seems to be a trick of the intelligence services, when under extreme pressure, to let out the most dangerous prisoners to cause havoc. Attacks on museums would perfectly accord with the work of this filth.

Reports from Israel say that Hamas has closed its Gaza borders with Egypt and have put numbers of their security personnel there. Like the US, Britain, Israel and the EU, Hamas has said that it wants to see the return of "calm and stability" in Egypt.

Leo
Jan 30 2011 14:52
Quote:
Suez workers in several factories r on strike, calling for the overthrowal of Mubarak.

This sounds quite positive. Also on revleft, someone posted something like this:

Quote:
REVOLUTION: [SocialJusticeNV] URGENT MESSAGE FROM EGYPT

This is why it is the *organized working-class* which must lead any
revolution against the bourgeoisie and their order: because it is the
*workers* who truly control the functioning of the electricity and
water and telecom services, etc. Without their say-so, NOTHING would
run in a modern city or society. Unorganized uprising, OTOH, is to be
expected -- in the beginning -- after decades of class treason at the
top of the working-class; but *it can only go so far* in its
'objectives' without in some way being *organized* -- i.e. having a
plan and a goal for seizing control of society from the various
grasping and bloody-minded 'national' capitalist oligarchies.

The working-class of Misr (Egypt) nust seize control of the
infrastructure of the cities and of the country. And by force of arms,
if necessary. By ANY means necessary.

All Power to the Workers' and Farmers' Councils and Communes.

-- grok.

Does anyone have any info on the situation in Mahalla?

squaler
Jan 30 2011 15:10

Tantawi is now Minister of Defence and Military Production. Live on Egyptian TV. Source: "This might trigger some heat."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohamed_Hussein_Tantawi

Valeriano Orobó...
Jan 30 2011 16:36

So no chance of a split amongst the military rank and file then?

Valeriano Orobó...
Jan 30 2011 16:41

According to tabula gazza, no:

"At some stage the military is going to stop acting as a mediating force and will try to take direct control. I have no illusions that they are acting as anything but a vessel for this sort of "stability" that the global North desires. In Egypt we are no longer in the age of military coups, it is not a question of who has the most influence within the military and what they can get away with, it is a matter of the interests of external forces are and these external forces are looking for the right partner within the current Egyptian regime. What does this mean on the ground? There will be harsh clashes between demonstrators against the military who will quickly switch sides."

rooieravotr
Jan 30 2011 16:49

Where is the info about strikes in Suez coming from?
edit: found it already, its in the 3arabawy Twitter chain just mentioned

Awesome Dude
Jan 30 2011 16:50
rooieravotr
Jan 30 2011 17:59

In answer to leo's question on Mahallah, I found this (BBC, at 1032 ):

Quote:
"We're getting reports of preparations for a large demonstration in Mahalla al Kubra, an industrial city north of Egypt. The city is home to many textile and gas factories. There was rioting last night near some of the factories, and reports of army reinforcements arriving at one of the main textile factories.
Matt_efc
Jan 30 2011 17:10

Guardian reporting that as El Baradei spoke there were "a notable number (who) chanted anti-ElBaradei slogans, asking 'how can you steal our revolution now?'

Khawaga
Jan 30 2011 18:13
Samotnaf wrote:
I know the Muslim Brotherhood have been hardly present during this movement, and most people are saying that this is because they don't know what to do. But maybe they're also playing a more long-term strategy; if the liberal democrats round ElBaradei get into power and dampen down the movement (concentrating on political reforms rather than social reforms related to survival) they could recuperate the very likely resurgence of social contestation into Islamic fundamentalist perspectives. Sure this is jumping the gun and is pretty much off the top of my head as my knowledge of Egypt is very very limited, but maybe it's worth considering, no?

Worth considering, yes. Likely, no. It is more probable that a Baradei led government will open up for the MB to legally take part in the political process either in a national unity government or simply part of the liberal democratic process. The MB doesn't want social unrest. They're also the party for the petit-bourgeoisie, for national unity, against divisions in the (Egyptian) Ummah and so on. The last 20 years or so they have been focusing on providing social welfare/charity (zakat) to build a constituency rather than agitating against the government's economic policies.

The MB's reaction to these protests were the same as their reactions to the original Mahallah uprising; late grudging support when they realize they have to.

jesse blue
Jan 30 2011 19:17

here is another analysis:

https://intheabsenceoftruth.noblogs.org/post/2011/01/30/two-revolts-tunisia-and-egypt-201011/

Quote:
In Egypt, too, it is not about the president; had it been about the president, all this had never happened. One could see (if one could see) a steady build-up of radical opposition activity over the last years; even including fully blown workers insurrections; and none of the so called opposition organizations, not the jaded character masques of the lefts (left-behinds form Arab revolutionary history themselves, too, around the infamous Kifaya coalition), and not the way more powerful Ikhwan al muslimun (the main organisation of Islamism) has been in any position to speak for these movements. To the contrary, their attempts to mobilize for demonstrations, even to call a general strike on the anniversaries of the uprising at Mahala al kubra had met no measurable response.

...