Egyptian uprising - updates and discussion

Egyptian uprising - updates and discussion

Live updates and discussion from the Egyptian uprising which began on 25 January 2011.

From the Egyptian Chronicles blog...

http://egyptianchronicles.blogspot.com/2011/01/jan25-is-getting-serious.html

Quote:
The January 25th protest is getting serious attention more and more. More Facebook pages and groups are calling for the #25 Jan and more political groups are going to participate in the huge event "They are about 17 groups".Many are praying that it be the start of a new thing in Egypt. Now if you are interested in following the protest on twitter to know its updates then follow this hash tag (#Jan25)

Surprisingly “Salafist movement for reform” aka “HAFS” has announced that it will participate in the event , this is the first time a Salafist movement participates in something like this considering the Salafist believes and teachings. I have my fear and my suspicion which I will keep it to myself. I know that this particular movement  has its political believes still ....

The Mahalla workers will participate too , you may remember how they made their own day on the 6th April from couple of years ago.

Another huge surprise or even change in this protest is its location in Cairo and Giza, it is no longer Down town or Nile corniche but rather at the famous Gamaat Al Doul street in Mohendessin , the heart of the middle class in Giza !! The other places are : Cairo university in Giza , Dawaran Shubra and Dawaran Al Mataria in Cairo.

The NDP will participate too , of course in pro-regime protests of love …etc. May be this will be a showdown between the regime and the opposition , the real opposition in Egypt on who has got the word in the street. There are rumors that the MOI will launch its thugs to create chaos and violence , all what I know for sure is  that the police will not enjoy their holiday because they will have to work.  Personally I think the regime will let that day pass peacefully in order not to push the people in to another degree of anger , the world is now watching the Arab countries post-Tunisian revolution in an anticipation.

The Egyptians in London are going to protest next Sunday January 23, 2011 at 1 PM in front of the Egyptian embassy in London , if you are there and interested in joining them then here is the Egyptian embassy address : 26 South Street, Westminster, London W1K 1DW. There will be also insh Allah a protest in Bologna , Italy. It will be held on the 23rd of January at 12 PM at Piazza del Nettuno. Also on Sunday there will be a protest held at 1 PM  in front of the Egyptian mission to the UN HQ in New York at at 304 East 44th Street.  Now it will not be the last capital in the world that will witness a protest in front of the Egyptian embassy or mission on that coming Sunday because there will be a protest in our embassy in Madrid at 1 PM too.

Our  great Tunisian brothers are going to protest in solidarity with the Egyptian people in front of the Egyptian embassy next January 25, 2011. Also our dear Jordanian brothers are going to protest inn front of the Egyptian embassy next January 25 ,2011. Our brothers in Yemen sent a solidarity email to the admin of “We are all Khaled Said” page.

Just like El General in Tunisia the Egyptian rap singers and bands are making songs for the #Jan25 just  like this one by rapper Ahmed Rock.There are lots of video clips on YouTube made by activists to encourage the people to participate in the protest of #Jan25.

Comments

baboon
Jan 30 2011 20:46

Reports confirmed on BBC 8 o'clock GMT of protests spreading in Mahalla.
Egyptian workers get their monthly pay tomorrow - or should do, that will be interesting.

From similar reports there seems to a concensus from the protesters that the state has released organised forces of intimidation as well as dangerous criminals, some with machine-guns. One young woman called it "terror". The degree of self-organisation is also great, not least because it is conscious of provocations and, what was called, "thugs" attacking and looting. One resident on neighbourhood watch the BBC quoted, said that his was a middle-class area bordering on an upper class area with the ghetto behind. He said that they weren't afraid of the ghetto but of the thugs. He said he respected the know-how of the ghetto and he and his group were working with them on joint patrols with mutually identifying symbols. Along with and from this self-organisation has clearly arisen the question of arms.

Khawaga
Jan 30 2011 21:02
baboon wrote:
"thugs"

These thugs are hired by the police and secret services. They are the provocation and have always been used for that. Back in the day when I went to protests in Cario there was always a large presence of ordinary cops and the baltagiya (i.e. thugs) that were lined up in neat formations next to the actual police. The baltagiya were often used to break up protests rather than tear gas and water cannons.

rooieravotr
Jan 30 2011 21:34

union initiative

People

Quote:
agreed to hold a press conference at 3:30pm this afternoon in Tahrir Square next to Omar Effendi Company store in downtown Cairo to announce the organization of the new Federation of Egyptian Trade Unions and to announce the formation of committees in all factories and enterprises to protect, defend them and to set a date for a general strike.

petey
Jan 30 2011 21:55

from the NYT:

Quote:
The Egyptian uprising, which emerged as a disparate and spontaneous grass-roots movement, began to coalesce Sunday, as the largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, threw its support behind a leading secular opposition figure, Mohamed ElBaradei, to negotiate on behalf of the forces seeking the fall of President Hosni Mubarak.

and, following kind of on what khawaga said,

Quote:
Many have darkly suggested that the government was behind the collapse of authority as a way to justify a crackdown or discredit protesters’ calls for change.

“We’re worried about the chaos, sure,” said Selma al-Tarzi, a 33-year-old film director who had her joined friends in Liberation Square. “But everyone is aware the chaos is generated by the government. The revolution is not generating the chaos.”

Still, driven by reports of looting, prison breaks and rumors that swirled across Cairo, fed by Egyptian television’s unrelenting coverage of lawlessness, it was clear that many feared the menace could grow worse, and might even undermine the protesters’ demands.

(bold mine)
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/31/world/middleeast/31-egypt.html?_r=1&hp

squaler
Jan 30 2011 22:31

http://twitter.com/monasosh/status/31766566227939328

I don't know why did we have police in the 1st place.We seem to be taking good care of each other,organizing traffic,cleaning streets

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:08

From the Arabist blog

Quote:
I just got a call from an eyewitness to a situation near my neighborhood. The person is a member of one of the Popular Committees (the citizen's watch groups protecting streets) in Mounira, a middle class central Cairo area. This morning around 6:30am a car drove up the street leading from Qasr al-Aini St. to Saad Zaghloul metro station. The citizen watch didn't let them go through at first, but then they showed them their State Security IDs, so they were allowed to pass. At the end of the street they stopped, opened the rear of the vehicle and dumped a body out. The citizen watch people ran towards them, and the State Security fired a few shots before getting back into the car. Another car sped in the Citizen Watch's direction and hit two of them companions before fleeing. When the neighborhood people reached the body, they saw it was a dead man who had been shot in the stomach. He is unidentified and the body been taken to Mounira's hospital.

A note on this: there have been widespread reports of security forces being involved in the looting and violence that has taken place. This is one of the many incidents I have heard about. No doubt we'll hear of more.

Issandr El Amrani January 30, 2011 at 9:04 PM

Also

Quote:
Something very fishy is taking place — the Egyptian people are being manipulated and terrified by the withdrawal of the police yesterday, reports (some of them perhaps untrue) of widespread looting, and yesterday's (during the day) relatively low military presence in the city. I can only speak about central Cairo, I suspect the situation is much worse in the Suez Canal cities, Alexandria and the Delta, and perhaps most of all the Sinai. I spoke to my former bawaab (doorman) who is near Aswan, where is he the police is still out and there is no military, although the local NDP office was ransacked and set on fire. So the situation is different from place to place, and there is very little national-level visibility.

There is a discourse of army vs. police that is emerging. I don't fully buy it — the police was pulled out to create this situation of chaos, and it's very probable that agent provocateurs are operating among the looters, although of course there is also real criminal gangs and neighborhoods toughs operating too... 

Issandr El Amrani January 30, 2011 at 10:51 AM

Wellclose Square
Jan 30 2011 23:15

It strikes me that - assuming people's suspicions about the government creating chaos through looting and 'lawlessness' are correct - we're looking at a kind of 'strategy of tension', conducted in a dispersed, 'low-level', but well-reported way.

Going back to the 'strategy of tension' as it has been understood in its 'classic' form - as a state response to the wave of social contestation in Italy in 1969, elaborated over the years - there are differences. So, we have the bomb in the Piazza Fontana, blamed by the state/media on anarchists, which kills many - a spectacular act which effectively stops a social movement in its tracks (as well as leading to the police murder of 'suspect', anarchist railworker, Giuseppe Pinelli). This conspicuous outrage helped discipline a movement 'from the top down' as 'spectacle' (an outrage subsequently proven to have been carried out by a fascist, but as an agent of the state, I believe).

I think Debord's definitions of the concentrated and diffuse spectacle, and their ultimate coalescence into integrated spectacle, may be useful tools to interpret such practices, although this thread isn't the right place to elaborate fully what is more than a hunch on my part (nor an extended definition of these terms - yet - I'm knackered... In short, the concentrated spectacle was characteristic of Stalinist state capitalism, while the diffuse was characteristic of 'Western democracies'). Debord saw Italy as a laboratory of new forms of repression, prefiguring the integrated spectacle he identified in his Comments. The possibly state-sanctioned 'lawlessness' which seems to dog the social movement in Egypt - information potentially transmitted to every home and portable communication device by state media - I think may be a 'bottom-up' (as opposed to 'top-down' Piazza Fontana-style spectacular) strategy of tension. It's all the more pernicious for the fact that it shades into 'genuine' manifestations of social contestation in the forms of the proletarian looting of supermarkets (played out at the level of everyday survival and refusal of commodity relations), as well as the retributive ransacking of the mansions of Mubarak's relatives. It niggles at everyone on the streets/Tahrir Square at an individualised level, in a way that a Piazza Fontana-style act wouldn't.

Just some thoughts...

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:27

From the EA liveblog

Quote:
2135 GMT: Unrest in Alexandria continues. Nic Robertson of CNN tweets:
Quote:
Army APC racing thru streets, chasing vigalantes on foot chasing a car.

Heavy machine gunfire erupts over Alex center as roaming groups of men throw rocks at passing vehicles

Streets of Alexandria tense amid very fluid security situation

2115 GMT: In Cairo, Al Jazeera reports that protesters in Tahrir Square have built campfires and spending the night getting to know one another.  In Alexandria, the network reports the number of protesters from today's protests exceeding150,000. 

2107 GMT: Nolanjazeera of Al Jazeera reports on Twitter:

Quote:
Volleys of gunfire ringing out over #Cairo right now. Sounds like area near Interior Ministry? Another sleepless night for #Egypt

Meanwhile, protesters' numbers have dwindled in Tahrir Square as night falls, but their presence continues even though another curfew has been imposed like the past days.

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:41

From Guardian live updates

Quote:
7.50pm: Human Rights Watch's Egypt researcher, Heba Fatma Morayef, says the mood in Tahrir Square is orderly and cooperative:
Quote:

Several thousand people remain in Tahrir Square, many say they're planning to spend the night and stay till Mubarak resigns. There was a huge cheer when we heard Mohamed El Baradei was coming but unfortunately most of us couldn't hear what he said - no loudspeakers, apparently.

The square has emptied out since the afternoon but it's still a great atmosphere, a sense of solidarity, and very well-behaved - people are sitting around bonfires, or walking around picking up rubbish. Crowds who find occasional looters drag them over to the soldiers and hand them over. And no sexual harassment – which is not the norm downtown, especially when there are big groups gathering! We're happy to be eating koshary - thank goodness vendors are still selling street food because we're starving.

6.41pm: Army tank joins in protesters' procession through Alexandria, Al-Jazeera TV reports. The commander of the tank insisted that the army had "no intention of stopping this march", the station says.

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:44

From Al Jazeera liveblog

Quote:
9:52pm Local Egyptian television reports police redeployments in certain Cairo neighborhoods. Our staff is on its way to investigate. As it remains difficult for Al Jazeera to provide video, listen to the most recent of our Cairo audio reports:

9:22pm Egypt's army is to extend the nationwide curfew from 3pm to 8am starting on Monday, says Egyptian state TV.

9:08pm Reports say that funerals for victims of recent violence have turned into protests in coastal Alexandria, where several police stations have already been torched and demonstrators continue to defy nationwide curfew.

7:49pm Tens of thousands of protesters in Mansoura are calling for President Mubarak to step down, and demonstrators continue marching in Alexandria despite the third consecutive nighttime curfew.

7:21pm Egyptian police are to return to the streets tomorrow, sources have told Al Jazeera. Meanwhile, protesters continue to demonstrate across the country.

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:48
petey
Jan 30 2011 23:50

NBC's man in cairo characterizes this as an unemployed and working class rebellion, led neither by students nor religious. those here familiar with the american mass media will know what a jolt it is to hear the working class credited with assertive, even positive, action.

however he also harped on the themes of looting and increasing "vigilantism" to stop it.

Schwarz
Jan 30 2011 23:58

While it seems that many Egyptians feel that the looting and terror is coming from government forces, and while we must be mindful of the 'strategy of tension' tactic that has been used by the state in the past, we should be careful not to overextend this analysis. After all, at least some of the looting is surely being done by non-government agents.

I don't think this should be surprising given the material conditions of the working class in Egypt. While the appropriation of commodities and the burning of shops is not nearly as powerful or exciting as, say, militant workers councils, this form of proletarian self-activity can be just as clear an expression of class antagonisms.

While looting, street actions and prison breaks all have consequences for Egyptian unity and the international support for the uprising amongst the bourgeois press and Western governments, I think it's shallow to chalk it all up to the actions of agent provocateurs.

Check this report by the New York Times:

New York Times wrote:
Driven by reports of looting, prison breaks and rumors that swirled across Cairo, fed by Egyptian television’s unrelenting coverage of lawlessness, it was clear that many feared the menace could grow worse, and might even undermine the protesters’ demands.

“I wish we could be like the United States with our own democracy, but we can’t,” said Sarah Elyashy, a 33-year-old woman in the neighborhood of Heliopolis, where men armed with broomsticks and kitchen knives took to the streets to defend their homes against the threat of looters. “We have to have a ruler with an iron hand.

Now, I don't know a thing about the social geography of Cairo, but this Heliopolis district is the home of Mubarak and seems to be quite wealthy district. This woman is clearly on the side of the dictatorship and these militia are being formed to defend their property in the absence of those who normally defend it - the police.

Are the people they fear are coming for their homes undercover agents or angry proletarians? It is too soon and we are too far away to judge.

Mark.
Jan 30 2011 23:59

http://twitter.com/3arabawy

Quote:
Gotta leave now and head back to the protests. Down with Mubarak. Down with Obama the hypocrite. Long live the Egyptian revolution.

We need more protests abroad in front of Egyptian embassies. Pressure your govts to cut all sort of relations with the Mubarak regime.

I attended the protests in Nasr City yesterday b4 heading to Tahrir, and the police used live ammunition on protesters.

Pigs at Nasr City Police Stations 1 & 2 have barricaded themselves inside the stations, shooting live ammunition at protesters from inside

State Security Police Stations in Daqahliya, Kafr El-Sheikh, Rafah, Damanhour, and in many other places have been torched down by protesters

Demonstrations continue in all Egyptian cities. People do not want Omar Suleiman. People want to see Mubarak on trial.

Khawaga
Jan 31 2011 00:13
Schwarz wrote:
Now, I don't know a thing about the social geography of Cairo, but this Heliopolis district is the home of Mubarak and seems to be quite wealthy district.

Heliopolis (Misr Gedida) is a mix of wealthy, middle class and poor people. While the presidential palace is at the outskirts of this area there are plenty of pockets of your typical urban poor. As far as I can tell the formation of militias to defend property/homes/museums etc. has happened all over Cairo in both poor and rich areas, though more in the latter. I've yet to find many accounts of what is happening in the "slums" (ashwayaat) or in working class only areas such as Imbaba.

In any case, I am sure that a lot of very wealthy Egyptians are pissing their pants.

Wellclose Square
Jan 31 2011 00:39

Schwarz said:

Quote:
While it seems that many Egyptians feel that the looting and terror is coming from government forces, and while we must be mindful of the 'strategy of tension' tactic that has been used by the state in the past, we should be careful not to overextend this analysis. After all, at least some of the looting is surely being done by non-government agents.
Quote:
I don't think this should be surprising given the material conditions of the working class in Egypt. While the appropriation of commodities and the burning of shops is not nearly as powerful or exciting as, say, militant workers councils, this form of proletarian self-activity can be just as clear an expression of class antagonisms.

While looting, street actions and prison breaks all have consequences for Egyptian unity and the international support for the uprising amongst the bourgeois press and Western governments, I think it's shallow to chalk it all up to the actions of agent provocateurs.

Quote:
Are the people they fear are coming for their homes undercover agents or angry proletarians? It is too soon and we are too far away to judge.

I agree with this analysis.

Quote:
While looting, street actions and prison breaks all have consequences for Egyptian unity and the international support for the uprising amongst the bourgeois press and Western governments, I think it's shallow to chalk it all up to the actions of agent provocateurs.

Any speculation on my part in my previous post (and from this distance, it is just speculation - 'too far away to judge') about perceptions and motives of 'looted'/'looters' isn't based on handwringing about the disruption of national unity and pandering to the bourgeois press and Western governments, though you're quite right to flag this up as concerns of middle class nationalists wanting liberal democracy (reading between the lines of your post). I'm certainly not 'chalking it all up to the actions of agent provocateurs' - there must be a very strong element of proletarian reappropriation, which I support, an element which is easily diverted into the discourse of 'law and order' as a bogeyman. Nevertheless, to speculate on the extent of state involvement is valid, even if rumour is all we've got to go on.

jonglier
Jan 31 2011 00:48

what do people think--

at times like this i am slightly inclined to believe that there is some vague kernel of truth in the fukuyama thesis. The reason I say this is simply that Tianamen square is not an option for Egypt at the moment, and this must be a good thing. Hilary Clinton says that there must be an ordered transition to democracy. However wavering the Americans may have been, it appears likely that they cannot afford to have their man in egypt, mubarek, sustaining himself through an atrocity. I read John Simpson from the bbc arguing this: that the us administration will have told mubarek "in no uncertain terms" that tianamen square is "not an option". In this sense, I am relieved that, in spite of the many problems remaining, certain brutalisms seem to be becoming less and less permissible.

what are your thoughts?

Red Marriott
Jan 31 2011 00:57

I'm told that BBC radio yesterday reported some demonstrators on the Manchester student demo wearing t-shirts with the slogan "walk like an Egyptian".

jesse blue
Jan 31 2011 01:51

https://intheabsenceoftruth.noblogs.org/post/2011/01/31/two-revolts-egypt-part-ii/

a new comment:

Quote:
In much the same way, another form of sel-organization sprang into existence: workers factories commitees, at least in the industrial strongholds, where workers unites to defend (we could translate that as: occupy) their workplace, and to organize a general strike. From these circles the attempt to form independent labor unions started, too.

These developements are significant in that there existed, at this stage, no more state control over parts of the life of society. People were given the opportunity, and the obligation, to organize themselves.

It seems that if there is a criterion defining social revolution in contrast to mere political revolution, that is this criterion. What we are facing, in Egypt, today, is a full blown social revolution.

Judging from how the Iranian revolution went wrong, back in 1979, you can already deduce that there is a danger, deeply entrenched in the twofold structure of this new and spontaneuos self-organization. The two branches, if you will, might tend to go different ways, because they represent totally different needs, and experience a total different dynamic; and this could be used to eventually undo them.

Schwarz
Jan 31 2011 04:20
Khawaga wrote:
Schwarz wrote:
Now, I don't know a thing about the social geography of Cairo, but this Heliopolis district is the home of Mubarak and seems to be quite wealthy district.

Heliopolis (Misr Gedida) is a mix of wealthy, middle class and poor people. While the presidential palace is at the outskirts of this area there are plenty of pockets of your typical urban poor. As far as I can tell the formation of militias to defend property/homes/museums etc. has happened all over Cairo in both poor and rich areas, though more in the latter. I've yet to find many accounts of what is happening in the "slums" (ashwayaat) or in working class only areas such as Imbaba.

In any case, I am sure that a lot of very wealthy Egyptians are pissing their pants.

Thanks for the word on Heliopolis, my info was just based on a wikipedia search! tongue

Wellclose Square wrote:
Any speculation on my part in my previous post (and from this distance, it is just speculation - 'too far away to judge') about perceptions and motives of 'looted'/'looters' isn't based on handwringing about the disruption of national unity and pandering to the bourgeois press and Western governments, though you're quite right to flag this up as concerns of middle class nationalists wanting liberal democracy (reading between the lines of your post). I'm certainly not 'chalking it all up to the actions of agent provocateurs' - there must be a very strong element of proletarian reappropriation, which I support, an element which is easily diverted into the discourse of 'law and order' as a bogeyman. Nevertheless, to speculate on the extent of state involvement is valid, even if rumour is all we've got to go on.

Yeah you caught the subtext of my post. Sorry I wasn't more clear on that, I wasn't casting aspersions on you or your analysis. I agree that it is valid to speculate on what is proletarian self-activity and what is provocation.

The Western bourgeois press is indeed in a tizzy about the appropriations and 'law and order'.

Here is a piece in the NY Times about Egypt and markets.

NY Times wrote:
On Wall Street, [the Egyptian revolt] is what is known as an exogenous event — a sudden political or economic jolt that cannot be predicted or modeled but sends shockwaves rippling through global markets.

Of course it is exogenous for Wall Street and their economists, for all their theories and algorithms they don't recognize that class struggle is endogenous to capitalism.

I hope the rich are pissing their pants in Egypt, Syria, New York, London and beyond.

Schwarz
Jan 31 2011 04:44

Oh shit, then there is this from the New York Times:
Elite Areas Attacked in Class War.

Quote:
As the government of Egypt shakes from a broad-based uprising, long-simmering resentments have burst into open class warfare.

Strong words from a paper that barely acknowledges the existence of class.

Quote:
“These big guys are stealing all the money,” said Mohamed Ibraham, a 24-year-old textile worker standing at his second job as a fruit peddler in a hard-pressed neighborhood called Dar-al-Salam. “If they were giving us our rights, why would we protest? People are desperate.”

He had little sympathy for those frightened by the specter of looting. He complained that he could barely afford his rent and said the police routinely humiliated him by shaking him down for money, overturning his cart or stealing his fruit. “And then we hear about how these big guys all have these new boats and the 100,000 pound villas. They are building housing, but not for us — for those people up high.”

Good eye, Mohamed, good eye!

Juan Conatz
Jan 31 2011 05:55

Came here to post that exact article@

Wellclose Square
Jan 31 2011 07:00
Schwarz wrote:
Oh shit, then there is this from the New York Times:
Elite Areas Attacked in Class War.
Quote:
As the government of Egypt shakes from a broad-based uprising, long-simmering resentments have burst into open class warfare.

Strong words from a paper that barely acknowledges the existence of class.

Quote:
“These big guys are stealing all the money,” said Mohamed Ibraham, a 24-year-old textile worker standing at his second job as a fruit peddler in a hard-pressed neighborhood called Dar-al-Salam. “If they were giving us our rights, why would we protest? People are desperate.”

He had little sympathy for those frightened by the specter of looting. He complained that he could barely afford his rent and said the police routinely humiliated him by shaking him down for money, overturning his cart or stealing his fruit. “And then we hear about how these big guys all have these new boats and the 100,000 pound villas. They are building housing, but not for us — for those people up high.”

Good eye, Mohamed, good eye!

So it is looking like there's a very strong proletarian content to this... that's good.

Caiman del Barrio
Jan 31 2011 11:11
Twitter wrote:
I walked back from Tahrir to Nasr City yesterday, saw popular committees. Many shabab with swords said they'll kill cops if they show up.

Thousands of leaflets were distributed by leftist activists in Tahrir and elsewhere yesterday calling for a general strike.

Mark.
Jan 31 2011 11:21

From EA liveblog

Quote:
1048 GMT: Very loud chants now around Tahrir Square as new demonstrations proceed. One appears to be from Shubra, a couple of kilometres away.

Al Jazeera correspondent says this is the "most organised" demonstration he has seen during the week.
1045 GMT: Al Arabiya is reporting a "massive protest" in Alexandria. Al Jazeera says neighbourhood watch groups are refusing to allow police to patrol their streets.

1035 GMT: The Rafah border with Gaza remains closed indefinitely. Al Jazeera English is reporting on Palestinians who escaped from Egyptian jails and returned to Gaza in the last 72 hours.

1020 GMT: Dan Nolan of Al Jazeera writes, "No ATMs making life hard for all but at least we have credit cards. Most Egyptians use cash. Many feeling very much under siege."

1015 GMT: Egypt's stock exchange remains closed.

1010 GMT: Ben Wedeman of CNN reports, "Lots of gunfire in Maadi [upper-income section of Cairo]. Many foreigners, Egyptians have left or are leaving. Stores full of buyers stocking up."

Caiman del Barrio
Jan 31 2011 11:23
Twitter wrote:
The workers at El-Ta3awon Printing House and Ghazl Meit Ghamr (textile) have kicked out their CEOs, and are now self managing the factories.
Auto
Jan 31 2011 11:39
Twitter wrote:
The workers at El-Ta3awon Printing House and Ghazl Meit Ghamr (textile) have kicked out their CEOs, and are now self managing the factories.

So much for there being 'no class composition' to this uprising... If true things could get interesting.

Anyone have any info on this new federation of trade unions? Political stance, aims, etc?

Entdinglichung
Jan 31 2011 12:06
Auto wrote:
Twitter wrote:
The workers at El-Ta3awon Printing House and Ghazl Meit Ghamr (textile) have kicked out their CEOs, and are now self managing the factories.

So much for there being 'no class composition' to this uprising... If true things could get interesting.

Anyone have any info on this new federation of trade unions? Political stance, aims, etc?

http://www.unionbook.org/profiles/blogs/egypt-new-trade-union

Today, representatives of the of the Egyptian labor movement, made up of the independent Egyptian trade unions of workers in real estate tax collection, the retirees, the technical health professionals and representatives of the important industrial areas in Egypt: Helwan, Mahalla al-Kubra, the tenth of Ramadan city, Sadat City and workers from the various industrial and economic sectors such as: garment & textiles, metals industry, pharmaceuticals, chemical industry, government employees, iron and steel, automotive, etc… And they agreed to hold a press conference at 3:30pm this afternoon in Tahrir Square next to Omar Effendi Company store in downtown Cairo to announce the organization of the new Federation of Egyptian Trade Unions and to announce the formation of committees in all factories and enterprises to protect, defend them and to set a date for a general strike. And to emphasize that the labor movement is in the heart and soul of the Egyptian Peoples’ revolution and its emphasis on the support for the six requirements as demanded by the Egyptian People's Revolution. To emphasize the economic and democratic demands voiced by the independent labor movement through thousands of strikes, sit-ins and protests by Egyptian workers in the past years.

squaler
Jan 31 2011 12:28

http://www.occupiedlondon.org/cairo/?p=121

pictures of grafitti with translations