The Tunisia effect: where next?

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Mark.
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Jan 29 2011 21:15
The Tunisia effect: where next?

On twitter

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Syrians inspired by both tunisia and Egypt are planning a collective protest against their corrupt Government on #Feb5

Calls for anti-regime protests in #Algeria on 12 February http://bit.ly/fUx1SZ (in Arabic)

The Syrian and Sudanese have set their revolution dates already?! Four down, eighteen more to go! #ArabRevolutions

Spanish TV TVE just reported troops in #Morocco were mobilised from Sahara to #Rabat & #Casablanca.

The first of these protests will be in the Sudan

Quote:
KHARTOUM, SUDAN —

A group of young Sudanese activists proclaim January 30, 2011 to be the beginning of peaceful demonstrations to bring down the military regime in Sudan. This campaign is calling on all sectors of Sudanese to get out January 30th and demonstrate in the streets of Sudan's most populated cities. The largest assembly and demonstration will take place on Palace Street, which is located a few meters from the presidential palace of Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir. The invitation for the demonstration excludes the leaders of the traditional opposition parties who are not willing to confront the Islamic military regime, which has been ruling Sudan since 1989.

The call for this action came one day after the leader of the Umma Party, Mr. Alsadiq Al-mahdi, announced that he would continue peaceful dialogue with the current government. His speech is widely regarded by most young Sudanese, including members of the Umma party, as disappointing and lacking insight into the systematic destruction of the country by Al-Bashir`s government. His political views show that he continues to disengage himself from the issues vital to Sudanese activists.  This call for demonstrations coincides with the 116th anniversary of the liberation of Khartoum by Imam Mohammed Ahmed al-Mahdi on January 26, 1885, great grandfather of Mr. Alsadiq Al-Mahdi. Their intent is to peacefully express anger at the decades of corruption, violence, and human right violations, which led to the separation of the South and which could lead to the potential separation of the West.

It is no secret that the young people who have called for the demonstration have seen what has happened in Tunisia and Egypt, where young generations have loudly spoken against unemployment and political marginalization.

We would like to be clear that this is a call for removal of this government.

In a statement, on its Facebook page, the Liberal Democratic Party, represented by Mr. Adel Abd Atti and Ms. Noor Tour, invite all members to participate in the demonstration, planned for January 30th.

It is time to change the face of Sudan and to end decades of injustice, marginalization, and corruption.

Yesterday there was a demo in Mauritania in support of the uprising in Egypt.

Quote:
Plusieurs centaines de Mauritaniens ont manifesté vendredi soir à Nouakchott pour exprimer leur soutien aux manifestants égyptiens, a constaté un correspondant de Xinhua.

Deux marches piétonne et motorisée ont parcouru l’avenue Nasser, principal artère de la capitale mauritanienne, scandant des slogans hostiles au président égyptien Hosni Moubarak.

Les manifestants ont également appelé le président Moubarak à "quitter le pouvoir et à laisser au peuple égyptien la liberté de choisir ses dirigeants". Les marcheurs qui se sont rassemblés devant l’ambassade d’Egypte à Nouakchott ont condamné la répression policière, dont ont été victimes les manifestants égyptiens avec lesquels ils ont exprimé toute leur solidarité.

Ces marches, qui se sont déroulées dans la discipline, étaient suivies par les forces de l’ordre.

rooieravotr
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Jan 30 2011 03:49

From Raw Story, based on AFP:

Quote:
More than 10,000 protesters marched against authorities in Algeria's northeastern city of Bejaia on Saturday, organisers said, in the country's latest rally inspired by neighbouring Tunisia.

Demonstrators marched peacefully in the city in Algeria's Berber-speaking Kabylie region, shouting Tunisia-inspired slogans such as: "For a radical change of the regime!," a lawmaker with the opposition Rally for Culture and Democracy (RCD), Mohamed Ikhervane, told AFP.

"The protest gathered more than 10,000 people," said RCD leader Said Sadi, whose group organised the rally.

Police were out in force around the city but protesters dispersed calmly, Ikhervane said.

Separately, pro-democracy group the Algerian League for the Defence of Human Rights (LADDH) said it plans a new march in Algiers on February 12.

Mark.
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Jan 30 2011 12:50

Report on the EA liveblog

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0900 GMT: Reports coming in of an anti-Government demonstration in Sudan. A participant, who says there were up to a 100 protesters, sends the message, "Riot police attacked us. Numbers started to build up. Protesters are spreading into smaller groups in internal streets."

http://twitter.com/simsimt

Quote:
CNN: Sudanese police, students clash in the capital http://bit.ly/enpk3q #Sudan

Thousands? RT @ykhogaly: Thousands of demonstrators are still in the center of Khartoum regrouping after tens of arrests, tear gas & beating

Epic moment of demo: college girl shouting at employees watching from distant at bank's doorstep: Why don't you join us? Aren't you men?

http://sudan30january.blogspot.com/ (in Arabic)

Mark.
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Jan 30 2011 12:51

Facebook for Syria protests (in Arabic)

http://www.facebook.com/pages/ywm-alghdb-alswry/147151028676674?v=wall

Mark.
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Jan 30 2011 22:11

Breaking news: The facebook-organized protests have begun in Khartoum. Stay tuned for continuous updates

Edited to add:

Quote:
Whether this will actually blow up to the same level we’ve seen in Tunisia and Egypt is something that remains to be seen. After all these recent events, nothing seems far fetched anymore.

There’s real anger, and rising prices and economic hardships are starting to sting people including those who are usually politically apathetic. Plus, with the results of the referendum, the South going bye bye, and weak opposition parties remaining, Northerners realize they’re going to be left all alone to deal with the government.

We’ve done it before twice, toppling two military dictatorships in 1964 and 1985, and it may just happen again if the people rise up.

UPDATE: Here’s a recently uploaded video of students from Khartoum University’s Faculty of Medicine protesting.

Mark.
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Jan 30 2011 22:13

Sudan police clash with protesters (Al Jazeera)

Quote:
Anti-government demonstrators in Khartoum faced riot police in protests inspired by those in Egypt and Tunisia.

Sudanese police have beaten and arrested students as protests broke out throughout Khartoum demanding the government resign, inspired by a popular uprising in neighbouring Egypt.

Hundreds of armed riot police on Sunday broke up groups of young Sudanese demonstrating in central Khartoum and surrounded the entrances of four universities in the capital, firing teargas and beating students at three of them.

Police beat students with batons as they chanted anti-government slogans such as "we are ready to die for Sudan" and "revolution, revolution until victory".

There were further protests in North Kordofan capital el-Obeid in Sudan's west, where around 500 protesters engulfed the market before police used tear gas to disperse them, three witnesses said.

"They were shouting against the government and demanding change," said witness Ahmed who declined to give his full name.

Sudan has a close affinity with Egypt - the two countries were united under British colonial rule. The unprecedented scenes there inspired calls for similar action in Sudan, where protests without permission, which is rarely given, are illegal.

Before Tunisia's popular revolt, Sudan was the last Arab country to overthrow a leader with popular protests, ousting Jaafar Nimeiri in 1985.

Groups have emerged on social networking sites calling themselves "Youth for Change" and "The Spark", since the uprisings in nearby Tunisia and close ally Egypt this month.

"Youth for Change" has attracted more than 15,000 members.

"The people of Sudan will not remain silent any more," its Facebook page said. "It is about time we demand our rights and take what's ours in a peaceful demonstration that will not involve any acts of sabotage."

The pro-democracy group Girifna ("We're fed up") said nine members were detained the night before the protest and opposition party officials listed almost 40 names of protesters arrested on Sunday. Five were injured, they added.

Opposition leader Mubarak al-Fadil told Reuters two of his sons were arrested on their way to the central protest.

Editor-in-chief of the al-Wan daily paper Hussein Khogali said his daughter had been detained by security forces since 0500 GMT accused of organising the Facebook-led protest.

Pro-government newspapers carried front page warnings against protests which they said would cause chaos and turmoil...

Mark.
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Jan 30 2011 22:17

The Syrians are watching (Al Jazeera)

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In the tea shops and internet cafes of Damascus, Syrians are asking what events in Egypt may mean for them.

In one of Old Damascus' new cafes, text messages buzzed between mobiles in quick succession, drawing woops of joy and thumbs up from astonished Syrians.

Suzan Mubarak, the wife of the Egyptian president, had flown into exile with her son - so the rumours went - driven out of the country by days of unprecedented protest against the 30-year rule of her husband.

The news from Cairo brought a flutter of excitement to this country, founded on principles so similar to Egypt that the two nations were once joined as one.

Like Egypt, Syria has been ruled for decades by a single party, with a security service that maintains an iron grip on its citizens. Both countries have been struggling to reform economies stifled for generations by central control in an effort to curb unemployment among a ballooning youth demographic.

Could the domino effect that spread from the streets of Tunis to Cairo soon hit Damascus? ...

Mike Harman
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Jan 31 2011 03:10
Mark. wrote:

That chant sounds suspiciously like "No ifs, no buts, no education cuts". Someone with better (i.e. at all) video skills than me should make a compilation video.

Mark. did you change your username recently? If so would you pm me your old one?

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 00:03

Mike - I've sent you a pm.

Sudan student dies in clashes (Al Jazeera)

Quote:
Protesters say he was beaten by police amid anti-government demonstrations in Khartoum and died of his wounds.

A student who was beaten by police during violent anti-government demonstrations in Khartoum, Sudan's capital, has died of his wounds in Omdurman hospital, protesters have said.

"Mohammed Abdulrahman, from Ahlia University, died last night in Omdurman hospital as a result of his ... wounds after he was beaten by police," said an activist who took part in Sunday's protests.

"This morning (Monday) both Ahlia University and the Islamic University of Omdurman have been closed by a government decision," said the activist, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Two other students said Abdulrahman had fallen during the clashes and was taken to the hospital, where medics informed them that he had died early on Monday.

"Medical sources confirmed to us that the student died yesterday from his injuries inflicted by security forces," said Yasir Arman, the top official in the north of south Sudan's main party, the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM).

Arman condemned the use of force and said the students were trying to hold peaceful demonstrations.

The Omdurman hospital morgue declined to comment on the death.

Witnesses said at least six universities in the capital and Sudan's regions were surrounded on Monday by hundreds of heavily armed police, preventing students from leaving the grounds.

University students in three towns in the north tried to escape to protest but were quickly arrested or beaten back by armed police, they said.

Sunday's demonstrations followed calls by the "30 January" Facebook group for Sudanese youth to take to the streets and stage peaceful anti-government rallies across Sudan.

The Facebook group, which has around 17,000 members, confirmed Abdulrahman had died, referring to him as a "martyr" who followed in the footsteps of another student killed in the October 1964 popular uprising that toppled the military regime then in power.

"Al-Gorashy was a martyr for us. And you are our martyr now, Mohammed Abdulrahman," it said in large red lettering. 

Protesters on Sunday were confronted by a heavy police presence in different parts of Khartoum and Omdurman, and in El-Obeid, aabout 600km west of the capital.

The ensuing clashes resulted in at least 64 arrests and left many wounded.

...

The demonstrations came after nearly a week of turmoil in Egypt, and coincided with the first complete preliminary results from this month's vote on independence for south Sudan, which confirmed a landslide for secession.

In Omdurman, just across the Nile from Khartoum, around 1,000 demonstrators shouted slogans against Omar al-Bashir, the president, and hurled rocks at riot  police, who retaliated with tear gas and batons.



At the medical faculty of Khartoum University, security officers tried to prevent about 300 student protesters from leaving the campus, but they eventually forced their way out onto the street, shouting: "Revolution against dictatorship!"



Police and security officers attacked them with batons, arresting several and forcing the students back inside the university compound, which was later surrounded by more than 20 police trucks.

On Monday, journalists said security forces prevented the opposition Ajras al-Huriya and the independent al-Sahafa newspapers from being distributed after they wrote about the protests.

"Security came to the printing press and stopped the paper going out," said Fayez al-Silaik, deputy editor of Ajras al- Huriya, adding his paper was targeted because it had a front page article on the protests.

Dozens of students including two sons of opposition politician Mubarak al-Fadil were arrested and many remain detained, activists and opposition officials said on Monday.

Widespread economic and political discontent has provoked sporadic street protests in north Sudan in recent weeks, with the security forces maintaining tight control in Khartoum.

Like Egypt, Sudan is also deep in economic crisis after a bloated import bill has eaten up foreign currency and forced an effective currency devaluation which sparked rising inflation.

This month the government cut subsidies on petroleum products and sugar, a key commodity in Sudan, sparking smaller protests throughout the north.

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 00:06

Thousands of Syrians vow a protest against al-Assad

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Thousands of Syrians have joined a Facebook group to call for a protest against their president on Friday, February 4, echoing Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution and Egypt’s Day of Rage on January 25. 


The group named “the Syria Revolution 2011,” is planning rallying young people in a march to protest against the Ba’thist regime led by Bashar al-Assad after Friday’s prayer.

The group described al-Assad’s rule as dictatorship and showed torture YouTube videos of political dissident in the country.



The group also called for civil disobedience, and encouraged “all of the brave Syrian youth, from all factions and social classes and from all provinces” to “not be silent about oppression.” ...

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 00:51

Algeria: confirmation of march In Algiers, 12 February. Call out by "National Coordination for Change and Democracy, which groups the autonomous unions, opposition movements and civil society organisations".

La marcha del 12 de febrero en Argel, una apuesta por un cambio social en Argelia

Quote:
Finalmente la marcha por el cambio ha sido fijada para el 12 de febrero en Argel por la Coordinación nacional para el cambio y la democracia, que agrupa al sindicalismo autónomo, a movimientos de oposición y organizaciones de la sociedad civil.

Esta coordinación, nacida el 21 de enero a raíz de las revueltas de principios de enero que provocaron cinco muertes y más de 800 heridos, había anunciado su intención de organizar una marcha en torno el 9 de febrero, fecha aniversario de la proclamación del estado de urgencia en Argelia.

El Presidente de honor de la Liga argelina para la defensa de los derechos humanos (LADDH), Ali Yahia Abdenour, anunció la fecha de la marcha para el sábado 12 de febrero, tras la reunión celebrada el viernes 28 de la coordinación, con participación de más de 200 personas en una reunión de aproximadamente 200 personas, viernes. El cambio de fecha se debe a que el sábado es día festivo por lo que la participación de l@s trabajador@s puede ser mucho mayor.

A partir de la reivindicación central, el levantamiento del estado de urgencia, instaurado hace 19 años, el planteamiento fundamental es “le départ du système", es decir, el cambio. Basándose en los ejemplos de Túnez y Egipto, se ha decidido adoptar el lema " sistema dégage" , haciendo hincapié en las reivindicaciones económicas y sociales, incluido el desempleo de los jóvenes (más del 20% de parad@s) y la escasez de vivienda, causas de la mayoría de las revueltas.

La marcha comenzará el sábado 12 de febrero a las 11 de la mañana en la plaza 1º de mayo para ir hasta la Plaza de los Mártires, al puie de la Casba y junto a Bad-el-oued, aunque el itinerario concreto se comunicará dios días antes, ya que se espera que la marcha sea prohibida, como lo fue la del RCD del día 22 de enero...

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 01:08

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010–2011_Arab_world_protests

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 01:11

Oman protestors call for fight against corruption

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Around 200 Omanis took to the streets on Monday [17 January] to demonstrate against corruption and high food prices, it has been reported.

Despite protests and trade unions being largely prohibited in the Gulf, police did not intervene in the protest, said the newswire AFP.

Protesters chanted slogans calling for an end to corruption and carried banners saying “Rising prices have destroyed the dreams of ordinary citizens”.

The crowd, which gathered outside the housing ministry, were reported to have been calling for higher wages and fixed costs for basic food items, which have dramatically risen amid the global downturn.

The Omani demonstration comes days after a revolt in Tunisia which toppled the 23-year presidency of Zine Al Abidine Bin Ali.

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 11:11

Sudan follow-up: more protests on Monday, big march called for Thursday

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After Sunday's protests of hundreds throughout Sudan, with at least one student dying in clashes, some development on Monday....

Journalists said security forces prevented the opposition Ajras al-Huriya and the independent al-Sahafa newspapers from being distributed after they wrote about the protests.

A Facebook hub for the opposition posted messages of demonstrations such as "Launched demonstrations now in Kosti". Later postings spoke of a protest, starting from Jackson Square in Khartoum, honouring the funeral of Mohamed Abdelrahman, the demonstrator killed on Sunday. There were claims, via a Twitter activist and via Facebook, of beatings by police and more detentions in both Kosti and Khartoum.

The activists have now called for marches on Thursday, posting the following message:

Quote:
We are young men and women of Sudan

We call on all to bring down the system, which has become an obstacle to the development of the country and we demand a pluralistic democratic system...for all states of Sudan, finding a just and comprehensive solution to the issue of Darfur and holding accountable perpetrators of crimes in this region.

We call on citizens to live with a decent resolution of economic hardship and for the alleviation of the suffering with an adjustment of prices and an end to unemployment.

We call on the junta to try to end corrupt and recover the people's money and to restore freedom and the dignity of our citizens.

The main image on the Facebook site mobilising protest has altered, featuring this message, "We won't let you die in vain --- Mohammad Abdel Rahman, martyr of the popular intifada. May God have mercy on his soul."

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ocelot
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Feb 1 2011 14:46

re Algeria

le Parisien: Début d'une série de grèves en Algérie

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Even if the street seems quiet since the riots in early January, Algeria bubbles also. A series of strikes is scheduled to begin this Tuesday across the country. movements of paramedic and education staff claiming wage increases are announced while the opposition is calling for a march on February 12 in Algiers, to demand "the departure of the system."

The Union of Algerian Paramedics (SAP) wants to pressure the Ministry of Health in providing the minimum service in major hospitals. The staff of Education followed suit in calling for a rally outside the department. They particularly wanted a salary increase and a rise in perfromance bonus.

The unemployed are to provide their share on February 6 with a protest outside the headquarters of the Ministry of Labour in Algiers, where they intend to file a platform of demands.

These movements of discontent occur at a crucial moment for the country where the revolution in Tunisia and Egypt is being scrutinized by the government which fears a serious contamination. The all-new National Coordination for Change and Democracy, which includes opposition movements and civil society organizations, called for a big march in the capital on February 12.

Unauthorized demonstrations

This coordination, born January 21 in the wake of riots in early January that killed five people and injured over 1000, demands the lifting of emergency rule, established 19 years ago, but especially "the departure of the system .

The coordination, which includes the Rally for Culture and Democracy (RCD Opposition) expects government approval for the march to be refused. The Algerian Interior Minister Dahou Ould Kablia recalled Sunday that no contract shall be authorized by the authorities in Algiers, in an interview with French daily Liberté. The Minister explained that the ban on marches were justified by security reasons.

On 22 January, a demonstration of the opposition RCD, was severely repressed by the authorities. Clashes between protesters and security forces have made a fifty wounded including seven policemen.

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 21:45

Sudan update

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Sudanese students defied arrests and beatings on Tuesday, pressing ahead with anti-government protests inspired by demonstrations in neighboring Egypt.

Opposition activists blame the government for rising food prices and have been protesting since Sunday around the country. They plan more demonstrations on February 3.

On Tuesday, some 200 students demonstrated outside al-Nilein university in Khartoum before hundreds of police beat them back and surrounded the university buildings with 20 vehicles.

Late on Monday students in Gezira, Sudan's farming heartland, and young people in the busy Khartoum suburb of al-Kalakla gathered chanting slogans against rising prices and repression.

"These ongoing rights violations are a pattern to silence dissident voices and limit access to information," the African Center for Justice and Peace Studies said in a statement.

"The responses undertaken by police forces...exemplify the extent to which the (ruling party) are unwilling to tolerate any other voices on the road to democratic transformation."

It said police had detained more than 100 people on the first day and arrests were continuing with people also being taken from their homes and offices. Activists are struggling to keep track of how many of their members have been detained...

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 21:52

Syrian revolution on facebook

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The Syrian Revolution 2011 الثورة السورية ضد بشار الاسد GO To Twitter Now and Share Our Page PLEASE!!! http://on.fb.me/Syrians Dont Forget the hash's #sharek #SyrianRevolution
Also please Send SMS Now To the Syrians By the country code 009639 Follow by any 8 Random numbers. Tell them we are going after the Friday Prayer for the Syrian Anger Dyay For Your FREEDOM infront of all Syrian Embassy's...DO IT NOW!! also in twitter...GO!
Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 23:40

Senegal government seeks to avoid the Tunisian scenario

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Friday, 14 January 2011

As Tunisians await the outcome of their rather rewarding protests, after weeks of demonstrations that ended the rule of their authoritarian leadership, the government of Senegal is searching for a suitable way of avoiding a similar situation.

President Abdoulaye Wade has reportedly tasked his government to figure out proposals to lower prices of basic commodities. This announcement was done Friday, as the Tunisian protest on similar grounds approached its climax.

Wade, according to a statement released by the cabinet, "expressed great concern about the high prices of essential commodities." The statement said he had therefore instructed his prime minister, Souleymane Ndene Ndiaye and the ministers of finance and commerce "to promptly submit possible proposals suitable to lower prices to relieve households."

Amid threats of action by the authorities, opposition politicians have since been nursing the idea of taking to the streets in protest of the rising prices of basic food stuffs in the country. The latest date for that protest has now been put at Tuesday.

Rise in prices of foodstuff and gas, which is mainly used for cooking, coupled with the country’s prevalent electricity problem, could be a perfect recipe for unrest in a country that is already engulfed in a messy political situation.

Mark.
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Feb 1 2011 23:52

Mid-East contagion fears for Saudi oil fields

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"Yemen, Sudan, Jordan and Syria all look vulnerable. However, the greatest risk in terms of both probability and severity is in Saudi Arabia," said a report by risk consultants Exclusive Analysis.

While markets have focused on possible disruption to the Suez Canal, conduit for 8pc of global shipping, it is unlikely that Egyptian leaders of any stripe would cut off an income stream worth $5bn (£3.1bn) a year to the Egyptian state.

"I don't think the Egyptians will ever dare to touch it," said Opec chief Abdalla El-Badri, adding that the separate Suez oil pipeline is "very well protected". The canal was blockaded after the Six Days War in 1967.

There has been less focus on the risk of instability spreading to Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province, headquarters of the Saudi oil giant Aramco. The region boasts the vast Safaniya, Shaybah and Ghawar oilfields. "This is potentially far more dangerous," said Faysal Itani, Mid-East strategist at Exclusive...

Mark.
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Feb 2 2011 00:13

Libya: calls for protest on 17 February

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Sandwiched between Tunisia, as it surmounts the impossible, and Egypt, as it wakes the sleeping giant, Libya has been, for the last 41 years, seemingly acquiescent to Gaddafi’s regime, despite its remarkable, historical struggle for independence against Mussolini’s Italy. Since the earliest days of the Tunisian uprising, many people have speculated as to whether the Sidi Bouzid contagion would infect the Libyan masses. When news of unrest over a ‘housing situation’ leaked via YouTube, many scrambled to follow further developments.

And then it was silent.

Libyan citizens, activists and members of the media struggled to navigate the Libyan black hole, eager to confirm any information that trickled out.  It became exceptionally difficult to discern whether or not a Libyan uprising was in the making and to distinguish rumor from reality.  Even under ‘normal’ circumstances, sources inside of Libya are scarce.  As the potential for mass protests mount and the regime continues to execute its counter strategy, those sources have become even harder to access.  As Egypt absorbs the majority of the world’s attention, there are promising developments that could bring us good news—the real possibility of Libyans demanding what they have been denied for decades as more and more Libyans inside and outside the country call for nationwide protests on February the 17th.

...

And finally, there has been some activity on the internet and on-the-ground suggesting that Libyans are organizing a day of protest, similar to that seen in Egypt, for the 17th of February.  Students in Benghazi, for example, have posted a press release calling on all Libyans to join them on the 17th. A Facebook page has recently been established in support of this day of solidarity.  There are also reports of protest supporters in Tripoli.  The large distances between Tripoli and Benghazi, both in regards to space and living conditions, have historically prevented uprisings that start in Benghazi to spread to Tripoli or even those that start in Libya’s south to spread northward.  Support in Tripoli is, therefore, promising news.

Mark.
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Feb 2 2011 00:16

Facebook page for revolution in Morocco

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Enough torture, enough oppression, enough monarchy. We the people of Morocco want a revolution to overthrow King Mohammed VI. We want freedom and democracy. Just like our sisters and brothers in Egypt and Tunisia we will rise against the tyrant regime.
Mark.
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Feb 3 2011 00:37
Mark.
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Feb 3 2011 00:49

The Syrian revolution يوم الغضب السوري

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xslavearcx
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Feb 3 2011 12:22

is there anything significant happening in saudi??

Mark.
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Feb 3 2011 12:37

Nothing I've heard of as yet though I haven't really looked for information. There has been unrest from the Shia minority in the past and I've seen the suggestion somewhere that the Iranian government's position of support for the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt is linked to an attempt to destabilise Saudi. I don't know enough to say whether there's any truth in this.

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xslavearcx
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Feb 3 2011 12:41

thanks mark smile

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Entdinglichung
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Feb 3 2011 13:19

therer were some protests by unemployed teachers in early January:

http://blogs.ft.com/beyond-brics/2011/02/03/saudi-arabia-riddle-of-the-regime/ & http://af.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idAFTRE7081FW20110109

Boris Badenov
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Feb 3 2011 15:31
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3 February - Algerians are active planning for protests similar to those in Tunisia and Egypt. A great march is announced for 12 February. But the Algiers government threatens to react as harshly as Mubarak in Egypt.

Several opposition groups in Algeria have called for mass protests in the Algerian capital Algiers on Saturday 12 February. The call comes from the political opposition, human rights groups, trade unions, student organisations and an association of the unemployed.

The groups' main demand is the lifting of Algeria's 19-year-old state of emergency, which has allowed the regime to limit political activities and human rights. They further demand the widening of the right to establish political parties, improved social welfare and democracy.

Contrary to most of the earlier unrests in Algeria - which regularly are violently suppressed by the army - it is neither the Berber minority nor the large Islamist opposition standing behind the call for protests. It is the same population groups that organised the Tunisia and Egypt protests.

This was also made clear in choosing a Saturday for the announced Algiers protest marches, not a Friday, which easily could have mobilised Islamists after the Friday prayers. The new opposition seems mostly secular and Arab.

Potentials for a social upheaval in Algeria are seen as enormous. While labour conditions have rapidly improved over the last years, youth unemployment is still exceeding 20 percent, according to official statistics. Most observers believe it is much higher, although below youth unemployment rates in other North African countries.

Early in January - responding to the unrest in Tunisia and triggered by significant price increases of basic food items - spontaneous protests broke out in Algeria. "But the authorities were able to take rapid measures to reduce these prices with the temporary elimination of custom duties and the value-added tax on those items," according to Algiers IMF mission head Joël Toujas-Bernaté.

But not only these social polices paused the Algeria unrests. On 22 January, police were ordered to stop and disperse protesters in Algiers. Several were injured in the clashes as police troops made it clear they would not allow any dissent.

The 22 January manifestations had demanded wider democratic and human rights in the country, with slogans calling for the freedom of assembly and expression. Further slogans called for President Abdelaziz Bouteflika.

The announced slogans for the planned 12 February protests are less provocative, but still call for wider political and human rights.

But Algerian acting Prime Minister Nouredine Yazid Zerhouni yesterday made it clear that such protests would be treated heavy-handedly, emphasising they were illegal. Whoever called for the protests later must "take on responsibility if damage should occur or if things get out of control," he warned in front of journalists.

Mr Zerhouni added that it was necessary to maintain the age-old state of emergency in place, given the threat of Al Qaeda and other militant Islamist movements in Algeria. The state of emergency originally was put in place during an Islamist uprising, 19 years ago, which was brutally crushed by the army, leaving over 100,000 dead.

The Algerian army, mostly seen as very loyal to President Bouteflika, has a long history of crushing revolts and uprisings. Most significantly, it fought a brutal civil war against - even more brutal - Islamists in the 1990s. But it has also crushes several local riots, often organised by the mostly rural Berber people.

Many therefore fear that a popular uprising in Algeria could become especially bloody. Others however hold that Algerian army privates would react in the same way as in Egypt if ordered to shoot at people like themselves.

Algeria has one of North Africa's most liberal media policies, with critical media existing, good access to foreign broadcasters such as 'Al Jazeera' and uncensored internet and mobile phone net access. There are repeated attacks on critical journalists, but generally, Algerians are free to receive information. The unrest in Egypt is well known and watched with great interest in the country.

The brutal attacks on protesters in Cairo yesterday however could spread fears about the consequences of a popular uprising in Algeria. The Algerian population to a large degree is exhausted by decades of insecurity, although mostly fed up with the Bouteflika regime.
http://www.afrol.com/articles/37221

Valeriano Orobó...
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Feb 3 2011 15:43
Quote:
The groups' main demand is the lifting of Algeria's 19-year-old state of emergency, which has allowed the regime to limit political activities and human rights.

It has already been lifted according to al-arabiya breaking news i posted in the egypt thread and it has just been confirmed in al-jazeera live stream too.

Valeriano Orobó...
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Feb 3 2011 15:47

It keeps being confirmed in al-arabiya stream by all contributors

ocelot's picture
ocelot
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Feb 3 2011 16:42

random opinion from Saudi

The Arab Revolution’s effect on Saudis

Quote:
With what’s going on right now in Yemen, Jordan, Syria, Tunis and Egypt, I get a lot of questions about how Saudis are taking it and what’s the reaction. The short answer is they are shocked and captivated but haven’t made up their minds about any of it.
[...]
They are watching, though. All over the country, all these Saudis who rarely watch or read the news and their only interests in doing so are for more local social openness or conservativeness (depending on their background), are now carefully observing what’s going on in neighboring countries. Saudis who didn’t know what the channel number for AlJazeera News was on their receivers now have it saved on their favorites list. University and high school students are now watching the news and social media feeds in their study breaks instead of an episode of Friends. It’s a new atmosphere. The thing lacking is analysis or a discussion on what it means for us.