'About to blow a fuse': IWW call for support in London warehouse workers campaign

'About to blow a fuse': IWW call for support in London warehouse workers campaign

The London IWW has started organising in London’s warehouses and is calling on activists, whether members or not, to support its campaign to unionise this underpaid and largely female, migrant workforce.

Together with the Angry Workers of the World, who have been active in London’s warehouses since 2013, distributing thousands of newsletters and making links with workers, the IWW plan a six-month organising drive starting this month at a group of non-unionised companies each employing over one hundred workers. The intention is not merely to focus on the miserable wages and working conditions typical of the industry but also the common problems faced by these workers as tenants, migrants and women.

To build support for this campaign, the IWW are holding a public meeting in Central London on Sunday 17th September at 4pm, where workers intend to present their organising strategy. They are encouraging all activists who are interested in supporting migrant workers, regardless of whether they’ve had previous contact with the IWW or not, to come to the meeting and get involved.

Talking to libcom.org, one worker and activist at a Tesco distribution centre described the situation in the warehouses and surrounding community as “tense”:

“The pressure at work itself is heavy enough, but the current political climate around Brexit and wider migration issues directly impacts on people. The workmates from eastern Europe are pissed off, having worked hard for years, they are now seen as 'unskilled' migrants who everyone - from Tories to Labour - can hypocritically blame for the low wages.

“At the same time the state and bosses force the workmates from South Asia to work 60 hours a week to raise their annual income above the official threshold to keep their spouses here or bring them over.”

Continuing, he explains that while the mainstream unions are “around”, they mainly serve to manage the divide between permanent and agency staff as well as the divide between male and female workers. Moreover, the existence of many of these warehouses in West London has meant workers have been deeply affected by the Grenfell disaster.

“Things are tough here out west, but the increasing economic and political pressure on local migrant workers in the supply-chain of the city is about to blow the fuse. A collective effort of the IWW and supporters can help workers to finally ditch the fear!"

For those interested in attending, the meeting on Sunday, 17th of September at 4pm will be held at the Mayday Rooms, 88 Fleet Street, London, EC4Y 1DH. For more information, check the Facebook event.

Posted By

Ed
Sep 9 2017 23:24

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  • Things are tough here out west, but the increasing economic and political pressure on local migrant workers in the supply-chain of the city is about to blow the fuse. A collective effort of the IWW and supporters can help workers to finally ditch the fear!

    An Angry West London warehouse worker

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Comments

boozemonarchy
Sep 10 2017 00:51

I remember hearing about AWW in the warehouses seemingly a long while ago - awesome to see this sustained effort carrying through. Cheers and solidarity from the U.S.

syndicalist
Sep 10 2017 16:07

Good luck. Solidarity

TheRealRadical1
Sep 10 2017 17:59

Great. I think that their movement should connect with other strikes and movements in tandem to take more total control of the economy, to place more pressure upon the bosses.

bisognasognare
Sep 10 2017 18:17

Here's a leaflet we made to invite people to the Sunday meeting, if anyone deems it useful

http://ge.tt/3ofleUm2

Mark.
Sep 10 2017 18:37

I wonder if there's any mileage in looking at a link up between warehouse organising and the International Dockworkers Council. The fairly recently organised IDC affiliate in Portugal, the Sindicato dos Estivadores e da Actividade Logística seems to be, in name at least, aiming to organise beyond dockworkers and looking at logistics workers outside ports. This may strengthen the position of both groups.