UK

Brown, James Morgan (18??-1893)

A short biography of James Morgan Brown, tailor, poet, gay socialist and anarchist communist.

Taking Leave of their senses – What does the Brexit vote mean? - Mouvement Communiste and Kolektivně proti kapitálu

Boris Johnson being a twat

An analysis of the meaning of the Brexit vote in the UK, published on 20 October 2016.

Aufstand und Produktion

Ein faktenhaltiges Gedankenspiel für die Debatte über Aufstandsstrategien der Arbeiter_innenklasse: Erste Schritte in einer sechsmonatigen revolutionären Übergangsperiode in Großbritannien.

Policing the Chartists

Policing the Chartist disturbances in Birmingham, 1838. Engraving from 1886 book

In response to the growing Charist movement the government turned to the army and the police to maintain control of the northern districts. As a result modern policing developed and the practice of loaning out Metropolitan Police to hot spots began.

40 years of Lucas Plan - Some thoughts

Some of us take part in the ’40 years of Lucas Plan’ conference in Birmingham, 26th of November 2016
(http://lucasplan.org.uk/) - We wrote down some basic thoughts on workers' control, the state and technology

The general strike of 1842

Illustration of a strike meeting

A detailed, full-length history of the UK Chartist general strike of 1842 against pay cuts and for universal male suffrage, by Mick Jenkins with an introduction by John Foster.

The Luddites: machine-breaking in regency England

Cartoon depicting the fictional Luddite leader Ned Ludd

A historical overview and analysis of the Luddite movement 1811-1816 which swept parts of the UK as workers smashed machines to defend their jobs, pay and conditions.

London's anarchist HQ: 127 Ossulston St, 1894-1927

Originally written for the Freedom building fundraising blog as part off a history series kicking off the campaign, this article looks at the anarchist links of Ossulston Street, London, which runs down the western flank of the British Library.

Legal action doesn't get the goods

Anti-Uber protest photographed by David Holt

The recent employment tribunal ruling against Uber is not the end of the 'gig-economy' and might not change anything