Algeria

Insurrection in North Africa: the story so far

In the latest development in the rapidly escalating situation in North Africa, the Tunisian President has been forced out of power, a new government formed and a state of emergency declared in the face of what can only be described as a working class rebellion.

The protests in North Africa: what is happening?

The protests against the high cost of living, unemployment and corruption have been growing since the end of the year throughout North Africa, spreading through both Tunisia and Algeria in more and more cities and involving more social sectors, to the extent that the situation in both countries has become extremely unstable - much to the concern of the United States and the European Union, the top two international guarantors of the oligarchic political systems that are perpetuated in the Maghreb, posing as "buffer states" against the advance of Islamic fundamentalism in the region.

From Sidi Bouzid to Bab-el-Oued, against the state, power and money

Poverty has been growing in North Africa since the beginning of the year. The price of food staples is soaring, there is less and less work, further reducing the pitiful spectrum of everyone’s means of survival. They are bringing out the old trick of the "crisis", making us believe that misery and revolt are new phenomena produced by it, while they are as old as money and authority. It only took a few sparks in Tunisia to set fire to the powder keg of an already explosive situation, right to Algeria.

The Sidi Bouzid revolution: Ben Ali flees as protests spread in Tunisia

Friday 14 January 2011 -- After a dramatic 24 hours when Tunisia's dictator president Ben Ali first tried promising liberalisation and an end to police shootings of demonstrators and then, this evening at 16:00, declaring martial law, he has finally fallen from office. While the rumours are still swirling, one thing is clear, Ben Ali has left Tunisia and the army has stepped in. The comments after this article contain continuous updates of the uprising.

Interview with an Algerian anarcho-syndicalist

Achour Idir is an organizer with the autonomous Algerian trade union, the Conseil des Lycées d'Algérie (CLA, Council of Secondary Schools of Algeria). He is 30 years old and lives in Algiers. In a country where there remain the stigmata of a Party-State, maintaining one's autonomy is not an easy thing. This is an interview with a class-struggle militant, who identifies with the red and black ideals of disobedience and resistance.

Apology for the Algerian insurrection - Jaime Semprun

Translated extracts of a pamphlet on the 2001 Algerian insurrection.

Algeria - further reading guide

libcom's guide to further reading about class struggle and history in Algeria.

Letters from Algeria: the situation after the uprising - The Red Menace

Accounts of a participant in the 1988 uprising against austerity measures in Algeria.

Surrealism in the Arab world

Cover of "libertarian desire"

Article printed in the journal Arsenal: Surrealist Subversion no.3, 1976, including The Manifesto of the Arab Surrealist Movement, 1975.