Argentina 2001

Horizontalism: Voices of popular power in Argentina - Marina Sitrin

Horizontalism is an oral history of the exciting transformations taking place since the popular rebellion. It is a story of cooperation, vision, creation and discovery. It is a history told by people in the various autonomous social movements, from the occupied factories, neighborhood assemblies, arts and independent media collectives, to the indigenous communities and unemployed workers movements.

The popular rebellion that began in December 2001 in Argentina with the IMF melt-down and subsequent capital flight sparked a process of creativity that continues to this day. Different from so many social movements of the past, this rebellion rejects political programs, opting instead to create directly democratic spaces on street corners, in factories, and throughout neighborhoods.

Worker Occupations in Argentina

A paper by Maurizio Atzeni looking at the degeneration of four co-operatives that arose during the upheavels in Argentina 2001.

Abstract:

The neighborhood is the new factory

An article by Liz Mason-Deese on the unemployed movement in Argentina since 2001.

In 2001, Argentina suffered an economic crisis, similar to the one that much of the world is experiencing today. After more than a decade of IMF-mandated structural adjustment, which only deepened poverty and unemployment, the government was forced to default on over $100 billion of public debt and declared a state of emergency in an attempt to calm public unrest.

From Crisis to Cooperatives: Lessons from Argentina’s Cartoneros

From Crisis to Cooperatives: Lessons from Argentina’s Cartoneros

A special Labor day (United States) documentary by Free Speech Radio News (FSRN) about the Argentine 2001 financial crisis and the rise of Cartoneros "Cardboard People" Cooperatives and the challenges they face.

From FSRN

No Future: the sinking of a country into oblivion

Wake up, rise up

Many of you might evoke riots and clashes with the police if one were to utter the word Argentina, as well as recuperated factories ran by workers, popular assemblies, demonstrations, and alternatives against the banking system and politicians.

That’s nice and well.

An account of setting up workplace assemblies

A short account by Raul, a ceramics worker, of how workers won the right to hold mass assemblies in the factory during work time.

His factory was Zanon in Argentina, made famous when workers later occupied it in 2001 and began running it themselves.

Zanon factory occupation - interview with workers

Zanon workers

An excellent set of interviews conducted with workers at the worker-run Zanon ceramics factory, occupied at the time of the Argentine uprising of 2001. It includes historical and background information.

This was published by Wildcat in December 2003 but has only now been translated into English (for prol-position news #6, July 2006), and a short introduction added. Although it is a bit old, it still contains unique insights into the situation, hopes, difficulties and dynamics of the occupation process and many personal interviews.

Argentina 2001 uprising Treason pamphlet

This pamphlet was produced to make available information about the massive working class revolts in Argentina in 2001-2. These struggles were probably the most important action of the global proletariat in recent years. In time what happened in Argentina will come to be seen as an event of similar importance to May 1968 in France when 10 million workers went on wildcat strike for three weeks.

Occupied Bauen Hotel - the struggle continues

If this story sounds vaguely familiar, it may be because Labourstart ran a campaign last year in support of workers in Argentina who, faced with a mismanaged business about to close decided to take matters into their own hands.

That company was Zanon and it's part of a network of worker-managed businesses that are transforming people's lives. At the centrr of that network is the Hotel Bauen, a four star hotel in Buenos Aires, run by its workers.

Argentine workers take control of industry

The workers of the San Justo glassworks in Buenos Aires never thought about owning their company, until it went bankrupt four years ago.

It was just one of thousands of businesses that sank as Argentina's once prosperous economy went into meltdown, pushing almost half the population below the poverty line.

Today a new furnace where the red hot glass is melted is burning. The factory is one of more than 100 "recovered businesses" which are now putting themselves forward as an alternative business model for the country.